On Thursday, President Donald Trump announced that the United States would be withdrawing from the Paris climate change accord, much to the chagrin of the ‘chicken little’ liberal media who declared the apocalypse was upon us.  CNN’s normally mild-mannered host Jake Tapper was visibly distraught during Sunday’s State of the Union when he was railing against U.N. Ambassador Nikki Haley for how the U.S. now looked to the rest of the world. But when spoke with climate alarmist/hypocrite Al Gore he was at peace. 



From drunken driving and Titanic sinking comparisons, to complaints about the impact on “racial justice,” liberals lost it when President Donald Trump officially announced the U.S. would quit the Paris Climate Accord.

The president held a press conference on June 1, saying the nation would walk away from the deal, but he was open to renegotiating a “fair” deal which would not harm the U.S. economy and result in job losses for American workers.



Using a tired line he’s been recycling since at least 2003, former vice president Al Gore criticized the media’s coverage of climate change — for not blaming it enough.

"Every night on the news is like a nature hike through the Book of Revelation," Al Gore said on May 6, according to The Hollywood Reporter. He had been asked about how the news media reports the issue. Gore said he would "wait for the newscasters to connect the dots," but claimed they rarely do.



On Friday (appearing in Saturday's print edition), the New York Times published its first column by Bret Stephens, the former Wall Street Journal columnist recently hired as a "conservative" voice. Its theme was that the political "hyperbole" about climate change doesn't match the underlying science — even if one trusts the underlying science. That alone was enough to send journalists into unhinged and often profane orbit.



Critics gave former Vice President Al Gore grief for predicting in An Inconvenient Truth that major cities including lower Manhattan would be underwater if severe ice melt occurred. Now Gore is rewriting history to claim his prediction came true in order to promote his upcoming film, An Inconvenient Sequel: Truth to Power, which debuted at Sundance on Jan. 19.

In this case, context is the difference between honesty and self-interested revisionism.



Former Vice President Al Gore still has admirers among the media, if the latest issue of The Hollywood Reporter is any guide.

Timed to the Sundance Film Festival opening night premiere of Gore’s Inconvenient Truth sequel, Gore sits regally perched on a stool on the cover of THR’s Jan. 27, issue.

Tatiana Siegel’s cover story dripped with adulation for Gore’s “optimism” and environmentalism, and was entirely devoid of criticism of him or his films. There was no mention of the errors or failed predictions in the An Inconvenient Truth, no charges of hypocrisy for flying around the world to show a slideshow instead of using videoconferencing or some other technology, and no reminder that the planet managed to survive beyond Gore’s “point of no return.” 



Sundance, the left-leaning indie film festival held in Utah each January, helped turn former vice president Al Gore into the media’s favorite film star. Now, the festival is set to do it again. A sequel to Gore’s film, An Inconvenient Truth, will premiere at the 2017 Sundance Film Festival, according to The Hollywood Reporter (THR). The original premiered at Sundance in 2006 before its wide release and media fanfare later that year.



Media outlets hyped former vice president Al Gore’s recent meeting with President-Elect Donald Trump. Since becoming a full time climate alarmist Gore has earned wealth and the accolades of the liberal news and entertainment media. His slideshow turned him into the “darling of Hollywood” according to the news media.



New York Times former Editorial Page editor Andrew Rosenthal, who never met a Republican he couldn’t call a racist, made one of his sporadic appearances at nytimes.com on Wednesday with “Donald Trump’s Big Idea: Don’t Blame Me” when he casually linked Trump to two of the most notorious mass murders in recent history with the smarmy observation that Trump had been named Person of the Year by Time Magazine, “a distinction also given to...Adolf Hitler and Joseph Stalin – twice.” Classy! Rosenthal also insisted that Trump voters must take responsibility for Trump's racism, xenophobia, and lying.



It is alleged that Hillary Clinton won a popular vote majority. Therefore, if the nation were not burdened with the antiquated Electoral College, anguished and freaked-out Americans whine, she, instead of Donald Trump, would be the next president of the United States. You say, "Hold it. Before you go further, Williams, what do you mean it is alleged that Clinton received most of the popular vote? It's a fact." I say "alleged" because according to Gregg Phillips of True the Vote, an estimated 3 million noncitizens voted. Presumably, those votes went to Clinton.



Next month, Donald Trump will become president, just as he would have if he’d defeated Hillary Clinton in a landslide of Nixon-McGovern proportions. Nonetheless, Trump’s loss of the popular vote remains a liberal talking point, and a taunting point for Jesse Berney. “Trump lost the vote for president by well over two-and-a-half million votes and counting, and it's driving him out of his mind,” wrote Berney in a Friday piece, adding that “the majority [of voters] rejected a near-sociopathic celebration of ignorance and the least qualified person ever to become a major party's nominee for president.”



On Wednesday's CNN Newsroom, host Brianna Keilar devoted a full segment to a college student in Michigan who will be an elector for Donald Trump when the Electoral College meets, and gave attention to his experience of receiving death threats from some who want him to change his vote. After recalling some of the threats, Michael Banerian also informed viewers that, by Michigan law, he and other electors from the state must vote for the candidate who won Michigan's popular vote or else they would simply be replaced by someone else.