The New York Times gave former special counsel Robert Mueller’s testimony on Capitol Hill a negative review in Thursday’s edition, terming it “shaky” and “halting,” even “excruciatingly awkward,” while tucking in rumors that he wasn’t fully engaged in the prosecution. Can one detect some frustration, even embarrassment in the paper’s coverage, now that the former special counsel, whose reputation for tenacity and “straight-arrow,” law-and-order omniscience the Times helped inflate, has flopped hard in public view? Now that Mueller’s shaky command of the details in his own report is public knowledge, we learn there were hints beforehand, which the Times apparently chose not to share.



Being a lefty journalist means never having to say you’re sorry. Good thing, too. You’d be so busy wiping egg from your face you’d barely have time to scream about climate change causing pregnant hens to fly. Take media-types’ early, swooning support for Al Jazeera’s attempts to enter the U.S. market. Sure, character witnesses Nicholas Kristof, Brian Stelter and the Boston Globe said, The Beheading Channel is dishonest, anti-Israel and anti-American, but it’s a fresh, intriguing anti-Israel and American bias.



New York Times columnist Nicholas Kristof spent yet another Easter Sunday trying to see just how little one can believe of Christianity’s anchoring ideas, and still consider oneself a Christian. Kristof refers to these regular interviews with theological figures as “my occasional series of conversations about Christianity.” All have the same theme -- seeing if one can get away with calling oneself a Christian if you don’t actually buy that whole virgin birth and Resurrection mythology. Fortunately for him that this year’s interviewee was on Kristof’s wavelength.



In May 2017, Robert Mueller was appointed special counsel to look into issues around possible Russian interference in the 2016 presidential election, which the media and Democrats quickly boiled down to a single word, “Collusion,” a vague charge which Donald Trump nonetheless was almost surely guilty of when it came to Russia. Twenty-two months later, the report has been issued and been summarized by Attorney General William Barr. Mueller and his team issued no indictments against Donald Trump or anyone in the Trump administration. To mark the end, here’s an extremely incomplete list of occasions Times reporters, editorialists and columnists freely tossing around the accusation of “collusion."



In the aftermath of the New Zealand mosque attacks, MSNBC host Ali Velshi predictably devoted an entire segment on his show to promoting more gun control while only havng on guests who are in line with his anti-gun views.



New York Times Nicholas Kristof has taken on an old nemesis, the National Rifle Association, in two multi-media pieces over the last two weeks – two weeks that have witnesses shooting tragedies. The Sunday Review brought the photo-heavy “Witness the N.R.A’s Evolution -- It’s magazine covers show how it shifted focus, to fanaticism.” A week earlier he said the group had been "hijacked by extremist leaders."



As Hurricane Michael smashed into the Florida panhandle, both MSNBC and CNN on Thursday were worried about the really important issue: How to educate the “bizarre” and ignorant Americans who don’t fully adopt the left’s prescriptions for solving global warming. MSNBC journalist Craig Melvin talked to fellow liberal Nicholas Kristof and lectured, “Most sane-thinking people would acknowledge that the intensity of the storms... due in no small part to climate change.” 



MSNBC’s live coverage of the Singapore summit between President Trump and North Korea's Kim Jong Un amounted to little more than an airing of grievances about the President. Right out of the gate, commentators commenced hurling scornful remarks about Trump’s supposed incompetence and apathy, until All In host Chris Hayes eventually asserted Donald Trump was not “burdened by caring” about the outcome of the summit. 



During an appearance on Sunday's edition of CNN's Reliable Sources, New York Times columnist Nicholas Kristof admitted that the media has an addiction to covering President Trump, leading them to avoid covering other newsworthy topics. He flushed this argument out further in a recent New York Times op-ed entitled “Our Addiction to Trump.” CNN host Brian Stelter admitted "I'm a Trump addict. I think I'm willing to admit that."



Appearing on Monday’s MSNBC Live With Stephanie Ruhle, left-wing New York Times columnist Nicholas Kristof promoted his latest piece for the paper, warning of a media “addiction” to covering the “car wreck” of Donald Trump’s presidency. He confessed that journalists “blew it in 2016" and feared the President’s agenda was being implemented while his press colleagues were being distracted by “the latest shiny object.”



After some liberal journalists initially praised President Trump’s willingness to meet with murderous North Korean dictator Kim Jong-un, a number of them remembered later Thursday night that they’re members of The Resistance. New York Times columnist Nicholas Kristof was one such lefty, telling host Lawrence O’Donnell on MSNBC’s The Last Word that Trump has made “a dangerous gamble,” despite Kristof’s past encouragement for direct talks and engagement.



On Wednesday, former reporter Frank Bruni’s ridiculous extended metaphor linked the Super Bowl, the New England Patriots, Donald Trump, and the American economy in a web of corruption: “The Hell of This Year’s Super Bowl.” The text box: “It’s the Patriots, again, and a metaphor for Trump’s America.” Not to be outdone, Nicholas Kristof wrote the next day that "American tobacco executives have killed more people than Stalin managed to...."