The knives were out on ABC and NBC late Wednesday night at the Republican National Convention (RNC) in reaction to Ted Cruz’s speech not endorsing Donald Trump as their reactions varied from Cruz having “badly miscalculated” to suggesting that Cruz would be blamed in November if Trump doesn’t win the general election.



The one-time ABC Sunday hosting duo of Sam Donaldson and Cokie Roberts appeared together on Tuesday morning on NPR's Morning Edition to discuss convention history. Roberts is still an NPR analyst. They began with the 1964 GOP convention, and Donaldson said "I think this was the first convention of the modern Republican hard-right conservatism." Roberts said "Absolutely right," noting "Nelson Rockefeller got booed."

Roberts said after 1964 and the passage of the Civil Rights Act, the Republican Party "became much more racist" and Donaldson joked in his usual way that Lyndon Johnson's fight for desegregation gave the South to the Republicans "forever!"



When a lone protester from the anti-American, far-left group Code Pink tried to make noise in the crowd at the Republican National Convention (RNC) on Tuesday night, the “big three” networks of ABC, CBS, and NBC tag-teamed with MSNBC to spent nearly six minutes showing and discussing the “scrappy” protester.



In the moments following FBI Director James Comey’s announcement on Tuesday that Hillary Clinton should not face criminal charges for her private e-mail servers scandal, the cast assembled by ABC News hailed the “extraordinary decision” as “a momentous day” signaling that “a cloud is lifted” for Clinton to continue on with the presidential race and President Obama to give his own thoughts on the matter.



On Sunday's morning's This Week show on ABC, hos Martha Raddatz asked normally unflappable Hillary Clinton supporter Cokie Roberts about the "deep mistrust" voters have towards presumptive Democratic Party nominee Hillary Clinton. Concerning her campaign, Roberts responded that "I don’t think they have a clue how to fix it." That's understandable. How do you "fix" a media-enabled problem at least two decades in the making?

Raddatz tried to deflect discussion of Mrs. Clinton's serious problem by telling people to go see the play Hamilton. Roberts took the cue, and in a bizarre non sequitur, said that Alexander Hamilton "lied too, to his wife."



Journalist and Hillary Clinton fan Cokie Roberts on Tuesday insisted that women will be “upset” if Donald Trump continues to highlight Bill Clinton’s past affairs and mistreatment of women. Talking to former Clinton operative turned Good Morning America co-host George Stephanopoulos, Roberts huffed, “Women will be very upset if they think that another woman is being blamed for her husband's infidelities.”



Appearing as a guest on Monday's CNN Newsroom with Brooke Baldwin to promote her book, Capital Dames, ABC News veteran Cokie Roberts -- also of NPR -- complained that GOP presidential candidate Donald Trump "created a lot of hatred and hostility" after "a half century of us trying to bring people together" as she invoked the Jim Crow South and blamed reports of children making racist insults on Trump's presidential campaign: "Having this whole two generations trying to bring America together and be one country, and to suddenly have a leader come in and try to break that all apart and pit groups against each other is very discouraging."



As former ABC This Week co-anchor Cokie Roberts appeared as a guest on Thursday's Morning Joe on MSNBC, she expressed agreement as liberal host Mika Brzezinski declared that GOP presidential candidate Ted Cruz "seems like a terrible choice" for Republicans to support to stop Donald Trump from winning. Brzezinski proclaimed: "I'm sure it is a little bit of, for me, my world view, ideology, but it just seems like Ted Cruz seems like a terrible choice to try and use -- am I wrong? Help me out with some objectivity."



MSNBC might have to build a deeper tank . . . so Cokie Roberts can dive into it for Hillary. On today's Morning Joe, Roberts of NPR complained about the resources the FBI is devoting to the investigation of Hillary Clinton's misuse of email.  Carped Cokie: "Don't they have other problems? There's no crime in the country they should be worrying about?"

Roberts' timing could hardly have been worse. Just moments before, Joe Scarborough pointed out that last week it was revealed that 22 of the emails on Hillary's server "were so sensitive that the State Department said releasing them would cause grave danger to the United States national security." Not worth investigating, Cokie? Really?



Laugh line of the morning comes from Cokie Roberts' Wikipedia entry: "Some have questioned Roberts' objectivity as a journalist." Some, indeed. On today's Morning Joe, NPR-ite Roberts, her eyes flashing with anger, asked Donald Trump whether he was "proud" of promoting racism among schoolkids: "There have been incidents of children, white children, pointing to their darker skinned classmates and saying 'you'll be deported when Donald Trump is president.' . . . Are you proud of that?" 

Calling it a "very nasty question," Trump replied "I'm not proud of it because I didn't even hear of it. And I don't like it at all when I hear about it." Roberts said that it's been reported in many papers, presumably alluding to articles such as this and this. You've got to read the transcript and view the video to get the full effect.  Cokie's doing it for . . . the children.



Vogue magazine published a typically gooey piece on Hillary Clinton in their March issue, typical because Vogue editor Anna Wintour has hosted two fundraisers for Hillary in this cycle, one in the Hamptons and one in Paris. Vogue writer Jonathan Van Meter interviewed only inside the Hillary bubble on this one, which included journalists like MSNBC’s Steve Kornacki and NPR’s Cokie Roberts.



Have you seen the GE commercial? Millenial son informs mom and dad that he has gotten a job at GE. Old-fashioned dad is enthusiastic: "proud of you, son. GE! Manufacturing!" He hands son "granpappy's" heavy old hammer. Son gently explains that rather than building "powerful machines," he'll be writing computer code. Disappointed dad: "he can't lift the hammer." Mom, with more compassion than conviction in her voice, consoles son: "it's okay though: you're gonna change the world."

On today's Morning JoeMika Brzezinski used that "change the world" line to mock Marco Rubio and Ted Cruz in the face of their underwhelming performance in the Nevada caucuses, in which Donald Trump exceeded their combined vote total. Rubbing it in, Mika also echoed dad's dagger: "they can't lift the hammer." Dr. Freud, care to explain the symbolism?