Both The New York Times and Washington Post blasted the free speech position taken by President Donald Trump last week. World leaders, led by New Zealand, united around the Christchurch Call to demand stronger internet censorship. This followed the deadly Christchurch terror attack that killed 51 Muslims. President Trump not only refused to sign on, but established a censorship reporting hotline. 



The White House slammed both Google and Facebook over the First Amendment when it passed on a New Zealand plea for censorship of online content. The Washington Post reported that while other foreign powers sign on to the Christchurch Call to Eliminate Terrorist and Violent Extremist Content Online, the White House refused.



In a pre-recorded interview that aired on Tuesday's Amanpour and Company, PBS host Christiane Amanpour slanted left on gun control and global warming alarmism as she spoke with liberal New Zealand Prime Minister Jacinda Ardern.



New York Times Magazine staff writer Jonathan Mahler and media reporter Jim Rutenberg teamed on a colossal, three-part investigation of Rupert Murdoch’s family drama and media empire that served as a hit piece on Fox News. The Times offensively attempted to tie the network to recent anti-Jewish and anti-Muslim terrorist attacks: "...some Fox News hosts and guests had been moving ever closer to openly embracing the most bigoted sentiments of the white-nationalist movement. A few days before the anti-Semitic attack on a Pittsburgh synagogue that killed 11 Jewish worshipers, a guest on Lou Dobbs’s show had said that a migrant caravan headed to the United States border from Honduras was being funded by the “Soros-occupied State Department.”



In the wake of the terrible terror attack in New Zealand that left several dead, tech companies are looking at censoring more content as a response. Microsoft President Brad Smith wrote a blog post on March 24 that called for a stronger approach to how tech companies deal with content they disagreed with on their platforms.



On Sunday's AM Joy show on MSNBC, host Joy Reid and The Intercept's Mehdi Hasan devoted a segment to fretting that there is a double standard in the treatment of Muslims as compared to whites after a mass shooting. Reid also invoked a debunked claim that white supremacist Dylann Roof was given special treatment after the Charleston massacre, and Hasan cited a misleading study claiming that most terrorism in the U.S. in the past decade has been perpetrated by whites.



CBS This Morning co-host Gayle King on Friday wondered if Americans should “take notes” from New Zealand’s gun control push. She pressed 2020 Democratic presidential candidate John Hickenlooper if taking away guns would be a “priority” for the liberal former Colorado governor. Guest co-host David Begnaud touted Hickenlooper’s hip appeal to millennials.  



For much of Thursday, a number of CNN and MSNBC hosts predictably reacted to the quick enaction of new gun restrictions in New Zealand by lamenting the fact that U.S. political leaders are not so willing to restrict the rights of its citizens to own guns, and mostly had guests who bolstered their left-leaning views.



Welcome back to Hollywood’s little fantasy roundtable about how “heartless” America is and how progressive countries show us “what leadership looks like.”



All three networks spent Thursday morning gushing in favor of New Zealand’s new gun ban, touting that it had “widespread, bipartisan support” with “very little opposition.” ABC, NBC and CBS also spent time shaming the U.S. for not adopting a similar buyback measure.



The Council on American-Islamic Relations is having a banner month. The militant Muslim group never lets a crisis go to waste. That means Americans should beware. When unappeasable CAIR is ascendant, our free speech rights, religious liberty and national security are at risk. Following the horrible massacre at two mosques in Christchurch, New Zealand, CAIR flacks were out in full force decrying “Islamophobia” and calling for crackdowns on “hate speech” (by which they mean any and all negative thoughts or words about CAIR or Islam).



As CNN anchors have repeatedly over the last several days made a point of highlighting vows by New Zealand's prime minster to enact new gun control quickly in response to the recent mosque attacks, CNN Newsroom host Brooke Baldwin went so far as to give a commentary suggesting that U.S. lawmakers have failed by not behaving more like New Zealand.