What NBC’s Willie Geist spun as a rundown of the political echo chambers in America on Sunday Today, quickly devolved into a condemnation of the rise of conservative media. “Fake news is a favorite term, as you know, of President Trump. What you consider real and fake in many cases has become a question of where you're sitting and who you're listening to,” declared Geist at the start of the segment. He ignored the fact that the term was first used to describe stories about Hillary Clinton during the 2016 election.


After a turbulent week in American politics where controversial stories about President Trump’s administration were broken by newspapers with long-standing histories bias, NBC spent some time on Sunday Today championing a relative newcomer to “the game.” “But this national moment has brought some new players into the game as well,” touted host Willie Geist. “NBC's Katy Tur shines our Sunday spotlight on a publication you never would have associated with politics until now.” That newcomer is fashion magazine Teen Vogue


After a whirlwind week in Washington, D.C. with the liberal media pouncing on every Trump news development as if it was the final nail in his presidency, CNN’s ‘ridiculous figure’ Brian Stelter and Anderson Cooper attacked conservative media for not sharing their excitement. “Downplay, deflect and deny. Conservative media types are at it again, whipping up alternative theories to explain away the threat that James Comey poses to President Trump,” Stelter chastised on Anderson Cooper 360 Thursday night. 


Many conservatives were in mourning Thursday after news broke of the death of Fox News mastermind Roger Ailes. In a statement, Media Research Center President Brent Bozell stated that “the Left would command a monopoly control of the so-called 'news' media but for the Fox News Channel, and FNC would not exist but for him.” But for NBC, it was a time to tear down what he did for conservative media and politics in general. 


En un segmento de los medios de comunicación cuyo presentador principal, Jorge Ramos de Univisión, se niega rotundamente a ser neutral en su cobertura del presidente Donald Trump, uno podría tener la impresión de que no hay ninguna cadena nacional en español que presente al presidente y sus políticas de manera justa frente a las audiencias, o donde tanto los rivales políticos  demócratas y republicanos  sean rutinariamente cuestionados ​​con el mismo rigor periodístico.


Monday night news broadcasts were dominated by a Washington Post report that claims that President Trump may have disclosed classified information to top Russian officials in the Oval Office. Many in the media were quick to pounce on the report and condemn the President. On MSNBC’s The 11Th Hour, host Brian Williams and some of his guests bemoaned how some Americans weren’t buying into their narratives about the President over the last few days, including the day’s breaking news story. 


President Trump and I have something in common. We were both invited to last Saturday's White House Correspondents' Dinner and we declined. The president wasn't interested in hearing himself mocked by an industry that holds him to a different standard than his predecessor and I wasn't interested in hearing the predictable jokes denigrating all things Republican, conservative and Fox News.


De manera predecible, Univision se han unido al desfile de prensa liberal en defensa de fondos públicos tanto para la Corporación para la Difusión Pública y la cadena Radio Nacional Pública (CPB y NPR, respectivamente, por sus siglas en inglés), con un informe totalmente sesgado que no sólo se queda corto en cuanto a hechos se refiere, sino también está cargado de omisiones y falacias.


Predictably, Univision has also now joined the liberal media parade in defense of taxpayer funding for the Corporation for Public Broadcasting (CPB) and National Public Radio (NPR), with a totally one-sided report that is short on facts, as well as laden with omissions and laughable fallacies.


Almost fifteen years ago, South Park paid tribute to a trailblazing animated TV series by calling an episode “The Simpsons Already Did It.” According to Columbia Journalism Review columnist Joel Simon, regardless of the current hubbub over President Trump’s media-bashing, several “Latin American populist” heads of state, including the late Venezuelan president Hugo Chávez, already did it, or something a lot like it, long before Trump dubbed certain MSM outlets “the enemy of the people,” a description he reaffirmed Friday morning in his speech at CPAC.


You simply can’t make this up. The mood was grim on Wednesday’s Hardball as MSNBC’s Chris Matthews, Mother Jones editor David Corn, and New York Times columnist Frank Bruni wallowed in how President-elect Donald Trump created a landscape where the news media is so distrusted that people might soon not trust movie times in newspapers.


One liberal academic argued for censorship of politicians who dissent from liberal orthodoxy on climate change. History professor at California State University, Sacramento Joseph A. Palermo argued President-Elect Donald Trump should not be able to use Twitter.