Patrick Stewart returns to Star Trek and the role of Jean-Luc Picard in a new CBS streaming show, but the reason it exists at all is, unsurprisingly, political. The liberal actor told Variety this week that Picard is “me responding to the world of Brexit and Trump.” he also said that the United States (under Trump) and Britain (under Conservative Prime Minister Boris Johnson) are “completely fucked.” 



The New York Times has invested three years of hostile coverage on Brexit and mockery of the (once) hopeless crusade of Boris Johnson to become British Prime Minister. Once in office, Johnson was vilified for attempting to lead the United Kingdom out of the European Union. The Times has blamed the Brexit push for, among other things, shorter life spans; racist and Islamophobic attacks, even “Talibanization.” Brexit supporters were mocked for “virtually cultlike certitude"; an opinion contributor insulted Brexit voters as “old people, 80 and above, wearing blank stares.” Feverish anti-Brexit, anti-Boris bias emanated from the Times in the run-up to Election Day December 12, which ended up wildly successful for the Conservative Party.



“Blowout” was how one UK newspaper described the decisive victory of Boris Johnson and his Conservative Party in last week's election. How decisive was it? Not only did conservatives win an 80-seat majority in Parliament, a constituency in Blythe Valley in Northeast England elected a conservative member for the first time since its creation 40 years ago. Pundits leading up to the election were wrong, as usual. They predicted a very tight race.



Glenn Simpson and Peter Fritsch, the deluded duo of former journalists behind Fusion GPS, the Democratic opposition research group responsible for the discredited “dossier” from British spy Christopher Steele, has put out a calling card for business in Great Britain: “Britain needs its own Mueller report on Russian ‘interference.’” Simpson and Fritsch, who helped snarl Donald Trump and his staff in years of bad-faith investigations, may be aiming for new political markets now that the U.S. establishment has belatedly gotten wise after a devastating Inspector General report.



In the latest entry in the New York Times’ increasingly shameless attacks on Brexit, the Conservative Party in Britain, and those who voted to leave the European Union. Patrick Kingsley reported for the front of Sunday’s paper, “A Brexit Road Trip, With Disunity at Every Stop.” Kingsley pined for the days of coal mines, an odd position for an environmental paper to take. But the sudden concern for coal miners was just another cynical weapon to attack Brexit, Margaret Thatcher’s free-market efforts, and conservatism in general.



Ever since the surprise referendum result in June 2016, the New York Times and rest of the mainstream press has been virulently anti-Brexit. That has translated into hostile coverage of Conservative Prime Minister Boris Johnson, who has called an election to strengthen his position as he attempts to make Brexit a reality. The New York Times is clearly stretching to attack Johnson with any weapon to hand, including actor Hugh Grant.



The New York Times doesn’t just inject anti-capitalist and anti-conservative positions into its “news” coverage, but uses every section to make its arguments, concealed under the rubrics of Arts or Style. The Times is gleeful over the inevitable demise of capitalism, as demonstrated by an enraptured take by culture reporter Jennifer Schuessler of a hard-left satirical exhibit, “Museum of Capitalism."



Steve Coogan is unabashedly pro-European and anti-Brexit. The comic actor from Stan & Ollie, Philomena and The Trip franchise often lets his films do the talking for him. He attacked conservative talk radio most recently with Hot Air, and his new film, Greed similarly swipes modern-day capitalism.



Leave it to liberal Tina Brown to turn a discussion about the woes of Prince Harry and Meghan Markle into one about the “racist” politics of “Brexit England.” The former Newsweek editor appeared on CBS This Morning, Thursday, to discuss the British tabloids and the royal family. Co-host Anthony Mason offered Brown the opportunity to bash her home country by wondering, “What role do you think race plays in this in the UK media?” 



Some nerve: New York Times anti-Brexit reporter Benjamin Mueller devoted 1,350 words Monday to going after his competitors on the Brexit-beat, accusing other media outlets of slanting the news in favor of British Prime Minister Boris Johnson’s quest to fulfill the 2916 vote to withdraw the United Kingdom from the European Union. As if the Times and Mueller himself hasn’t been notoriously, often hysterically, anti-Brexit in news coverage: “Pro-Brexit Press Frames Johnson as Defiant Hero.” The online headline deck: “For Pro-Brexit Press, Boris Johnson Is Already a Winner -- The right-wing newspapers that dominate in Britain shaped a narrative of events that could have not been more pleasing to the prime minister.”



British Prime Minister Boris Johnson’s push for Brexit has made the New York Times lose its wits. Reporter Benjamin Mueller filed the audacious story on Friday: “Johnson Is Told His Slurs on Opponents Could Incite Violence – Female M.P.’s Against Brexit.” The text box: “Linking a leader’s incendiary language to death threats.” Such a story takes an amazing amount to nerve for the paper to publish, given that Brexiteers have been routinely smeared in the Times. The paper has blamed Brexit for, among other things, shorter life spans; racist and Islamophobic attacks, even “Talibanization.”



The New York Times devoted a full page to a strikingly condemnatory profile of Dominic Cummings, a political consultant who directed the successful Leave campaign in 2016, and is also an “evil” “puppet master,” “Rasputin,” and “political assassin.” It’s of a piece with the paper’s extraordinarily slanted coverage of Brexit and the new Prime Minister Boris Johnson, a stout and aggressive fighter for “Brexit” -- the withdrawal of Great Britain from the European Union. The online headline simply states the slur as a fact: “Dominic Cummings, Boris Johnson’s Rasputin, Is Feeling the Heat of Brexit.”