Episode three of Our Cartoon President aired on Showtime February 18. Titled “Rolling Back Obama,” President Trump declares his legacy to be that he tore down the legacy of President Obama. Thank goodness it is only a half hour show because even this Stephen Colbert creation couldn’t seem to think of much of a legacy to tear down.


In the wake of the Friday indictments of Russians by special counsel Robert Mueller, several media outlets have found a highly disingenuous way to continue attacking President Donald Trump as claiming collusion between Russia and the Trump campaign is a "hoax" or "fake news." Deputy Attorney General Rod Rosensteini explicitly stated they presented no evidence of collusion in the indictment, but somehow, he made Trump's "hoax claim harder to sell." 


On Thursday's Velshi and Ruhle on MSNBC, as the entire show was devoted to the school shootings in Florida, host Stephanie Ruhle repeatedly mocked opponents of gun control as she listed nine prominent Republicans on screen who have tweeted condolences for the victims with the MSNBC host noting how much money the NRA has spent supporting each of them. She went on to declare that a hunter who needs an AR-15 to hit a target must be a "lousy loser" and then seemed to make a veiled hint that those who resist new gun laws are "jerks."

 


The Freeform comedy Grownish follows Zoey Johnson (Yara Shahidi) after she leaves her family home on ABC's Blackish and goes off to college. She's growing up and learning new things and, on the February 14 episode "Erase Your Social," the lesson is about how to handle social media. Of course, they decided to make it about Trump.


On Wednesday, a Global Opinions Editor at the Washington Post praised the work of Christopher Steele as "extraordinarily prescient," created by a man who "had stumbled onto a breathtaking threat to U.S. national security." Accordingly, Steele, per the headline at Christian Caryl's opinion piece, "is a hero – and Americans owe him their thanks" — a Four-Pinocchio claim by the Post's own standards.


The anti-Trump opposition to President Donald Trump has gotten so loony that even Never Trumper David Frum is now worried that their crazed rantings will undermine the case against Trump. The senior editor of The Atlantic expressed his concerns in that periodical today with The Anti-Trump Recoil Goes Too Far:


On Monday, the panel of MSNBC’s Deadline: White House giddily dished about whether they might have finally stumbled upon a narrative that could cause President Trump to lose the support of his otherwise consistent base.


Have you been looking to close out your weekend with a program that is insufferable and self-satisfied beyond measure? Then, boy, does HBO have the show for you! Here and Now premiered February 11 with its pilot episode "Eleven, Eleven," which introduced us to the painfully enlightened Bayer-Boatwright family. If you wonder how much of a cliche the show is, it opens with a dude in a man bun riding his bike down the streets of Portland. Of course. 


While the the liberal media lauds fascist dictators at the Winter Olympics, liberal Hollywood lectures us (with a wink and a nod) about fascist presidents on Showtime’s Homeland.


Showtime describes their new "workplace comedy" Our Cartoon President from executive producer Stephen Colbert as a “hilarious look into the Trump presidency.” Spoiler alert: this show is not hilarious, unless maybe you have Trump derangement syndrome or have extremely low standards for comedy.


All too often, talking about the American entertainment industry can be disheartening but especially since President Trump’s election in November 2016 with the rise of the Resistance. Here’s a recent example. As MRC Culture’s Matt Philbin reported on February 4, CBS is developing a TV series based on the life of former Attorney General Eric Holder with Holder himself serving as executive producer. 


New York Times media columnist Jim Rutenberg’s essay for The Wilson Quarterly was hailed as a “behind-the-scenes look” at the paper coming to journalistic life after being attacked by Trump: “How ‘Fake News’ Changed The New York Times – and Didn’t.” The first subhead of the Wilson Quarterly piece gave the game away: “Suddenly, Our Mission Got Really Clear” (Right when Trump became president!) Remember that it was Rutenberg who penned the notorious front-page jeremiad on August 8, 2016, "The Challenge Trump Poses to Objectivity." He asked, “If you're a working journalist and you believe that Donald J. Trump is a demagogue playing to the nation's worst racist and nationalistic tendencies....how the heck are you supposed to cover him?"