Once upon a time, brothers-in-law William Procter and James Gamble sold candles and soap. Their 19th-century family business grew into the largest consumer goods conglomerate in the world -- launching the most recognizable brands on our grocery shelves, including Tide, Pampers, Crest, Nyquil and Old Spice. Now, Procter & Gamble want to conquer a new market: identity-politics pandering.


After a six-month respite, the Associated Press has started aggressively going after Donald Trump and his administration over conditions in the U.S. economy. In an opening salvo at 1:25 p.m. on Tuesday, the AP criticized as "not completely accurate" the following completely accurate Trump tweet: "Highest Stock Market EVER, best economic numbers in years, unemployment lowest in 17 years, wages raising."


The White House declared the week of July 16, “Made in America” week to celebrate U.S. manufacturing -- a continuance of President Donald Trump’s “America First” campaign focus. But ABC, CBS and NBC evening news shows minimized the administration’s focus, mentioning it only one night of the week and used it to criticize Trump.


Amid the endless media obsession with Trump scandal allegations, important policy issues are getting short shrift. Considering that the left is happy with the status quo -- the autopilot advancement of statism -- this can only please Democrats. Based on the overwhelming trend of national and state elections since 2010, the nation now firmly rejects liberal policies. Whether or not Democrats get the message, they don't intend to move right to accommodate the electorate. 


There are political movements to push the federal minimum hourly wage to $15. Raising the minimum wage has popular support among Americans. Their reasons include fighting poverty, preventing worker exploitation and providing a living wage. For the most part, the intentions behind the support for raising the minimum wage are decent.


At Fox Business Network on Monday, Stuart Varney interviewed Zane Tankel, the Chairman and CEO of Apple-Metro Inc., the New York City metro area Applebee's franchisee. While discussing the impact of minimum-wage laws on his business, he effectively brought up another law, the one in economics known as supply and demand, informing Varney that "We have 1,000 less servers this time this year than we had this time last year."


April Ryan has been a frequent subject this year at NewsBusters, given her proclivity to see racism where there is none, her failure to understand the difference between a person's annual income and their net worth, and her criticism of center-right news sites allowed into White House briefings as "fake news peddlers." Naturally, Ryan's next move after that final item was to join serial fake news perpetrator CNN as an analyst. Three months into her new gig, she has embarrassed herself several times, perhaps never moreso than on Monday, when she first tweeted her belief that a Trump administration official had made up the term "stagflation," and then pathetically tried to claim she had been joking.


In late June, economists at the University of Washington published a study that showed just how harmful the $15/hour minimum wage hike was for the city of Seattle. And despite that evidence, CBS ran a story Wednesday evening bemoaning how the city of St. Louis was planning to reverse their $10/hour minimum wage hike back down to $7.70/hour. “Well, cities all over America have been boosting their minimum wage. It's up to $15 an hour in Seattle,” announced fill-in Anchor James Brown at the start of the segment. “But it's going in the opposite direction in St. Louis.”


Greg Caskey is a 27-year-old Abington, Pennsylvania, native who is a social sciences teacher at Delaware Military Academy. The academy is a thriving charter high school in Wilmington, Delaware, that was founded in 2003 by two retired military officers, Charles Baldwin and Jack Wintermantel.


One series of MSNBC hot takes came on Deadline: White House about the U.S. leaving the Paris climate deal from former Time editor and Kerry State Department official Richard Stengel, who admitted that the move “does depress me a little bit” and will mean that the U.S. is now longer the most powerful nation on earth but simply “Little America.”

 


When we discuss international trade and balance of payments, there are two types of accounts. There is the current account, which includes goods and services imported and exported and receives the most political attention. In 2016, the American people imported $479 billion worth of goods and services from Chinese producers, and we sold $170 billion worth of goods and services to Chinese customers. 


A Sunday item in the San Francisco Chronicle covered what reporter Justin Phillips has found is a major challenge for that city's restaurateurs. You see, many of them are struggling with how much virtue-signaling is appropriate in the wake of the election of Donald Trump and that city's defiant insistence on remaining an illegal-immigrant sanctuary. In light of a recent Harvard study on the effect of higher-than-market minimum wages and dismal jobs data from the government, restaurateurs and the press which covers this industry and several others need to look harder at another far more important issue: how many of these establishments will be unable to remain in business.