On Thursday, Media Research Center President Brent Bozell and more than 20 conservative leaders released a statement rejecting Facebook’s “insulting” response to specific examples of bias. They declared, “No conservative leader or organization should accept this as a legitimate response to the undeniable issues we have raised.” The Media Research Center (MRC) also leads a group called the Free Speech Alliance of almost 60 organizations dedicated to combating the censorship of conservatives online. 



On Tuesday, Media Research Center President Brent Bozell and other conservative leaders released a letter calling on Google to explain reports and allegations that the search engine is attempting to block conservative sites and exclude voices that don’t fit the liberal narrative. (A similar letter has also been sent to members of Congress, asking them to investigate.) The letter to Google can be found, in its entirety, below: 



On Thursday, Media Research Center President Brent Bozell and other conservative leaders released the following joint letter to Attorney General William Barr, detailing the growing threat of online censorship from social media outlets such as Facebook, Twitter, Google and YouTube. 



RESTON, VA: On Tuesday, Media Research Center Founder and President Brent Bozell and 34 conservative leaders issued an open letter to the news media calling on them to apologize to the students from Covington Catholic High School in Kentucky for their vicious media coverage against the students following their attendance at the 2019 March for Life.



On Thursday afternoon, Media Research Center President Brent Bozell led a team of a dozen conservative leaders in demanding the major broadcast networks fulfill their “duty to the American public” and end the censorship of the Clinton/Russian uranium deal. 



Conservative leaders on Wednesday joined a call by the Media Research Center’s Brent Bozell that journalists fairly — and accurately — cover Senator Chuck Schumer’s attempts to trash Supreme Court nominee Neil Gorsuch. On Wednesday, Schumer held a press conference in which he sneered, “Judge Gorsuch may act like a neutral, calm judge, but his record and his career clearly show he harbors a right-wing, pro-corporate, special interests agenda.” 



As many leading pundits in the media pointed out, last night’s debate was probably Donald Trump’s last major opportunity to turn the tide of the campaign. Though Trump was the winner on points, he was nowhere near close enough to the decisive knock out he needed to gain the initiative. 



Following the second 2016 presidential debate on Sunday night between Democratic candidate Hillary Clinton and Republican candidate Donald, a diverse array of conservative leaders (including Media Research Center President and Founder Brent Bozell) offered their reactions to the proceedings and the biased performances of debate co-moderators Anderson Cooper and Martha Raddatz.



Ben Carson seems to be joining the likes of Michele Bachmann and Howard Dean on the list of presidential candidates who generated a lot of early buzz but became distant also-rans well before a nominee was chosen. According to Washington Monthly blogger David Atkins, Carson’s campaign also offers yet more proof that conservatives tend to be easy marks for scammers.

“The libertarian-conservative ethic of ‘get rich any way you can’ combined with a stubborn dismissal of objective fact makes political conservatism especially ripe for con artistry,” argued Atkins in a Saturday post. “It’s no accident that the tea party has been home to one grifter after another making a quick buck…Fox News itself is a long con perpetrated on fearful, older white Americans with the goal of making Rupert Murdoch and Roger Ailes rich while keeping Republican politicians in power.”



Richard Viguerie, Conservative Activst; Eliot Spitzer, CNN Host; & Kathleen Parker, CNN Host | NewsBusters.orgConservative Richard Viguerie brought his criticism of CNN's "left-of-center" bent on Thursday's Parker-Spitzer, and recommended that the network bring on more "articulate conservatives." The two CNN hosts, whom Viguerie recently criticized in a recent column, did their best to support his allegation by bringing on four liberals as guests during the program.

The conservative wrote an August 17, 2010 column in the Washington Examiner criticizing CNN for claiming that they're "playing it right down the middle," when in reality, they lean towards the liberal side. Parker launched right into addressing her guest's criticism: "So, we're going to go ahead and get the elephant out of the room, and I'm not talking about you. But you did write about me....that I am a 'pleasantly wishy-washy, mostly plain vanilla Republican.' It's hard to see your words applied when the person is actually present, isn't it?"

Viguerie replied by half-jokingly taking back his label, but immediately gave her another: