Tuesday afternoon, Clay Waters at NewsBusters noted how two September 18 items in the New York Times ridiculed Texas and Florida, two recently hurricane-ravaged states whose governors and legislatures are pro-growth and Republican. Josh Boak, an economics writer at the Associated Press, was actually a day ahead of them on Florida, filing a Sunday item which claimed that "Irma's destructive floodwaters renewed fears about how to manage the state's population boom as the risks of climate change intensify."


CNBC’s Joe Kernen slammed anti-Trump media bias on Nov. 8, and branded the New York Times as an honorary member of the Clinton campaign. He joked that The New York Times staff had “honorary position” in the Clinton campaign.

 

Leaked emails from the Clinton campaign cast doubts on CNBC Chief Washington Correspondent John Harwood’s ability to be an objective reporter when it came to Hillary Clinton. But after The Hill accused Harwood on Nov. 7, of colluding with the Clinton campaign, he denied the charge on Twitter.

 

The 68th Primetime Emmy Awards host Jimmy Kimmel dutifully proclaimed that this year’s award show was “the most diverse ever.” But, much like last year’s show, diversity means liberal Hollywood's brand of in-your-face transgender agendas, feminist themes, Hillary support, and Trump bashing. 


If it's sauce for the goose, it's sauce for the Hillary . . . Question for MSNBC's Katy Tur: of all the epithets Donald Trump pinned on his primary opponents, which was the first and arguably most effective? Bet you answered "low-energy," with which Trump of course famously jabbed Jeb. It stuck, and helped drive Jeb from the race.

Did people suggest at the time that Trump was hitting below the belt? Nope. So why is it suddenly unfair for Trump to say something very similar about Hillary? On today's Morning Joe, discussing Trump's critique of Hillary, Tur claimed: "there's this veiled sexism they have been accused of, somebody that doesn't have the strength and stamina, somebody who should not be president." 


According to Dylan Matthews, Donald Trump attracts a highly diverse group of foes. Some of them (mostly Democrats and independents) find racism appalling, but others (notably some prominent Republicans) are fine with it as long as it’s packaged in a certain way.

In a Wednesday article, Matthews remarked that even though GOPers such as Jeb Bush and Mitt Romney have sharply criticized Trump, they’re “lining up behind a candidate who [also] relies on white supremacist sentiment and fear to drive his support. His name just happens to be Ted Cruz.” Therefore, concluded Matthews, “the Republican #NeverTrump movement has basically nothing to do with sincere concern about Trump's racism. If it did, that would also rule Cruz out of contention.”


In almost two days, Donald Trump -- the presumptive front-runner in the 2016 Republican presidential primary campaign -- has used his Twitter account to regularly call Megyn Kelly, the popular host of The Kelly File on the Fox News Channel, “crazy.”

In an article on the TV Newser website, Mark Joyella explains “Why We Shouldn't Accept Donald Trump Calling Megyn Kelly 'Crazy,'” especially after Tuesday night, “when he rolled to victories in Florida, North Carolina, Missouri and Illinois."


Mark it down, said Joe Scarborough. Okay, done. On today's Morning JoeScarborough repeatedly, emphatically, declared that Ted Cruz's campaign is "over." The campaign ended, said Scarborough, when Cruz lost evangelicals in South Carolina to Trump, despite the Donald's praise of Planned Parenthood.

Scarborough let it be known that he would have voted for Jeb Bush, and also admires John Kasich. But with Jeb gone, Joe wants to clear the field of both Kasich and Cruz to set up a one-on-one between Rubio and Trump. Given the criticism of Scarborough for what some of us saw as bias against Rubio, interesting that Joe now would like to give Rubio, among all others, the chance to take Trump down.


Liberal anchor Carol Costello shamelessly touted two ads from Hillary Clinton and Bernie Sanders on Wednesday's CNN Newsroom. Costello turned to a guest who works for a "group that creates television and radio ads," but failed to mention that his firm mainly deals with Democratic candidates. She prompted him to describe why Clinton's "ad is so effective." Later, Costello heralded the ad from the Sanders campaign: "If you watch the whole ad, it actually gives you goosebumps. It's very moving." The ad consultant replied, "It's a beautiful ad."


CNN's Athena Jones spotlighted the latest pro-gun control headline on the New York Daily News's front page during Wednesday's New Day. Jones, who was following Jeb Bush's campaign, noted that the former Florida governor was "getting some attention for a tweeted photo of a handgun engraved with his name. The caption: 'America.' The New York Daily News having some fun with that picture, with the headline, 'Dolt .45;' and the caption, 'Desperate Jeb Bush gets ripped for tweet suggesting guns are America.'"


Could the end be near for Jeb Bush's presidential campaign? Would a back-in-the-pack finish in South Carolina be the final blow? Kasie Hunt seems to suggest so.

MSNBC's Hunt, appearing on today's With All Due Respect, sounded an ominous note for Bush fans. Reporting that the Bush campaign has been disappointed by the lack of a bump coming off a strong debate performance, Hunt said "to a certain extent there's a little bit of throwing up of the hands . . . The sense I'm getting from the people I talk to in the Bush circle is getting more and more pessimistic."


So apparently a "Moments" curator at Twitter has taken offense at Jeb Bush tweeting out a photo of a handgun which he owns.