A new documentary about Reconstruction is set to begin airing on PBS tomorrow night and Harvard Professor Henry Louis Gates Jr. was on MSNBC's Morning Joe to talk about it. What started as an interesting conversation about the history of post-war America during the Reconstruction Era quickly degenerated into a segment that compared President Trump and the conservative members of the Supreme Court to the Klansmen and Jim Crow supporters of that era.



Like most observers, The Nation’s Walsh expected that the voters who backed Barack Obama in 2008 and 2012 would turn out for Hillary Clinton, whose presidency would safeguard Obama’s “political, social, and racial legacy.” Of course, countless expectations were dashed on November 8, when, as Walsh puts it, an “unexpected surge of white voters…took their country back from a black man [and] refused to hand it over to a liberal white woman.” In her piece, Walsh suggested that Obama hurt Hillary’s chances of winning pretty much by just being himself for eight years.



On Friday's CNN Tonight, during a discussion of former Illinois Republican Rep. Joe Walsh's appearance earlier in the show to discuss his recent tweet attacking President Barack Obama's criticisms of police activity, liberal CNN political commentator Van Jones incorrectly claimed that Walsh had shouted, "You lie!" as President Obama spoke to Congress in September 2009. Host Don Lemon even contributed to the misinformation by injecting, "You lie," before Jones even finished reciting his mistaken recollection.

But, in reality, it was a different Republican "Joe" -- South Carolina Republican Rep. Joe Wilson -- who shouted, "You lie!" as President Obama spoke to Congress, as Rep. Walsh was not even elected to Congress until November 2010. Fellow panel members and CNN personalities Charles Blow and W. Kamau Bell both failed to pick up on Jones's error as Bell even nodded in agreement.



During a panel discussion on Meet the Press, New York Times reporter Helene Cooper rehashed President Obama’s infamous scolding of the Cambridge, Massachusetts police for acting “stupidly,” recalling that at the time Obama's take “made sense to me.” 



The North Korean e-mail hack of Sony continues to haunt Hollywood. The leftist group WikiLeaks recently posted a searchable set of the documents and the London Daily Mail found a new scandal subject: Ben Affleck....and PBS.

Featured on the show Finding Your Roots, Affleck demanded (and got) the censorship of a slave-holder in his family tree, creating a scandal for the public-broadcasting network. The show that aired in November only honored his mother for her Freedom Rider activism during the black civil rights movement in the Sixties.



It’s funny how hard-earned success can change even a liberal’s view about the greatness of this country. That’s exactly what happened to rapper Nas as he revealed on Friday's Charlie Rose show: “Where I was once a rebel to America...I love America!”

On to promote the new documentary Time is Illmatic the hip-hop star was asked by Rose “Why do you like America a lot more? Because it accepted you?” Nas responded: “No! I don’t want to feel accepted...I want to earn it.” He then continued to express pride in his country: (video after the jump)



For all his accomplishments, Henry Louis Gates might be doomed to being best remembered as the man whose arrest led to the "Beer Summit." But the Harvard prof had something surprising to say on today's Morning Joe: Gates questioned the need for affirmative action for affluent African-Americans, saying instead such programs should seek to help poor people, regardless of race.

Gates made the personal political, citing the case of his own two daughters, whom Gates described as having a "privileged" life."Do they really need to benefit from affirmative action?", asked Gates rhetorically.  View the video after the jump.



PBS has announced its new fall schedule, and it unfolds like a reinforced liberal stereotype. It includes a "landmark" six-hour series on Latino-American history narrated by Benjamin Bratt, and a six-hour series on African-American history narrated by Henry Louis “Beer Summit” Gates, from America's colonial period "up to the present day — when America has a black president yet remains a nation divided by race."

The liberal network will air a “Great Performances” special titled “Barbra Streisand: Back to Brooklyn,” and, of course, to mark the 50th anniversary of the dark day in Dallas when President Kennedy was shot and killed, PBS is planning hours and hours of JFK specials:      



"Finding Your Roots with Henry Louis Gates Jr." is another of the Harvard professor's wonderful television series for PBS. This is "must-see TV" and a more than worthy sequel to three previous projects Gates has hosted about how some of us came to be what and who we are.

In this latest 10-part series, Gates explores the genealogical and genetic history of a diverse group of people, from entertainer Harry Connick Jr. and Pastor Rick Warren to former Secretary of State Condoleezza Rice and Brown University President Ruth Simmons. There are less famous people, but the famous get you hooked for the rest.



President Obama's vacation in Martha's Vineyard also became an occasion for a panel of liberal journalists, politicians, and academics to mourn his alleged mistreatment in the media at a race-and-the-media panel discussion organized by Harvard professor Charles Ogletree. PBS Washington Week anchor Gwen Ifill  lamented the overwhelming media bias against Obama in the Henry Louis Gates controversy, when Obama said he didn't have all the facts, but the local police "acted stupidly" for their actions in arresting Gates on his own porch.

Ifill somehow ignored that the Obama-supporting news networks pouted over how this comment was a "distraction" from passing ObamaCare, and overpublicized the "beer summit" Obama held at the White House with Gates and his arresting police officer to fix any public-relations damage he might have incurred. (She even ignored the newscast she sometimes anchors, the PBS NewsHour.) On August 18, the Vineyard Gazette reported Ifill complained:



It's not just members of the media standing up to support disgraced journalist Helen Thomas after her unscheduled retirement caused by anti-Semitic remarks she made on camera last week.

The rabbi that caught her disgusting comments on videotape and put them on the Internet has received 25,000 hate-email messages - and counting.

Hours after MSNBC's Keith Olbermann actually called Rabbi David Nesenoff one of his "Worst Persons in the World," CBS-TV in New York reported the vicious electronic attacks streaming into the rabbi's inbox like a "ticker tape" (video follows with partial transcript, h/t HotAirPundit):



Harvard Professor Henry Louis Gates appeared on Friday’s Good Morning America to promote a new series on genealogy and revealed to George Stephanopoulos that he might be related to Hillary Clinton. Gates told the former Democratic staffer turned journalist, "You are very likely a maternal cousin with Hillary Clinton."[Audio available here.]

Gates, who very famously was involved in an altercation with the Cambridge police in 2009, recounted how Stephanopoulos (to promote the GMA segment) submitted a swab sample for the DNA company 23andMe: "According to 23andMe, George, you most likely share an ancestor with a very prominent American woman, a person who, like your haplotype, is an intrepid traveler yourself."