Today’s installment of the Media Research Center’s “Best Notable Quotables of 2014,” as selected by our 40 expert judges, the “The Audacity of Dopes Award for the Wackiest Analysis of the Year.”



Demonstrating that serving as the Palace Guard for Dear Leader is a 24-7-365 enterprise, Zachary A. Goldfarb, policy editor at The Washington Post, somehow felt the need on Sunday morning to critique the Saturday Night Live opening skit which appeared the previous evening.

Twelve hours after the skit was first broadcast, Goldfarb, whose whose full archive going back to August indicates that he has not written a WaPo item for Sunday publication in the past four months, nitpicked a comedy skit for — oh the humanity! — failing to distinguish between an "Executive Order" and "executive action" (bolds are mine):



Washington Post reporter Zachary Goldfarb caused spit takes in Washington on Friday morning. At the top left of the paper, the headline is "Obama budget to rebuff austerity." Or, as Goldfarb described the new White House budget document, "Obama will call for an an end to the era of austerity that has dogged his presidency..."

Is there nobody at the Post who can properly understand that the largest deficits in American history have occurred in the past five years? This was quickly mocked on Twitter:



How deep in the tank for Obama is The Washington Post? On the front of Monday’s Style section was article headlined “The ring of truth: Aiming to inspire, Obama candidly share his story with at-risk young men from inner-city Chicago. Can he make a difference?”

Bizarrely, the Post put “The ring of truth” over an article where Obama relates to students by referring to his memoir “Dreams From My Father,” so much of which has a ring of falsehood. We know this directly from Washington Post assistant managing editor David Maraniss, whose historical research into Obama's life story informed his view that the memoir was “literature,” not history.



On Sunday, The Washington Post reported on its front page “Democratic Party feeling heat from a revived left.” They rarely acknowledge the Democrats have an ideological base, and almost never use the word “liberal” to describe it.

Reporter Zachary Goldfarb did use the word “liberal” routinely, but when you want to push something really leftist, you aren’t getting extreme, you are growing more “populist.” The more leftist you get, the more you appeal to the people? There were no extreme labels for the left, but Obama’s allegedly been embracing “conservative thinking.” The Post easily finds a “far right” in the Republican Party, as in these recent examples from the news staff:  



The Washington Post offered a balance of experts in their story on the new apostolic exhortation published by Pope Francis -- including Ed Morrissey of Hot Air -- even as they were impressed at how Francis used “trickle-down” like a liberal Democrat. The “direct reference to 'trickle-down' economics in the English translation of his statement is striking,” confessed reporters Zachary Goldfarb and Michelle Boorstein.

But demonstrating the liberal media’s dual tendency to praise Francis and slam his predecessor Pope Benedict, Goldfarb and Boorstein uncorked a sentence that is factually false:



Thanks to some clever thinking from his staff, President Obama has an "ambitious plan to expand high-speed Internet access in schools that would allow students to use digital notebooks and teachers to customize lessons as never before," the Washington Post's Zachary Goldfarb giddily gushed in the lead paragraph of his August 14 front page article "Obama pushes Internet proposal." 

"Better yet, the president would not need Congress to approve it," the Post scribe added. The catch, obviously, is that the so-called ConnectEd program "would cost billions of dollars" and so the president "wants to pay for it by raising fees for mobile-phone users" by getting the Federal Communications Commission (FCC) to approve the plan. Of course, that's just a tax on the American consumer by a different name, and it's taxation without representation to boot, but Goldfarb waited until about halfway through his article to get to any constitutional objection to the scheme: 



To his credit, the Washington Post's Zachary A. Goldfarb reported yesterday that the Obama administration is possibly repeating the same policy mistakes that sank the housing market.   To get to the heart of the matter, our national housing bubble quickly inflated as a result of too many people with poor credit buying homes that they couldn’t afford.  As that number multiplied, banks created more unstable mortgages to keep up with demand until eventually the bubble burst

Well, it seems that Mr. Obama is pushing banks to restart this self-destructive economic policy.  Goldfarb wrote:



In what looks like a commentary on the front page, Washington Post reporter Zachary Goldfarb's story was a liberal lament: "Signing cuts, Obama lets priorities slip." The little sequester is somehow a major failure for Obama's liberal vision.

"With his signature this week, President Obama will lock into place deep spending cuts that threaten to undermine his second-term economic vision just four months after he won re-election," Goldfarb mourned. Liberal economist Lawrence Mishel has the wackiest quote in the piece:



The Congressional Budget Office recently reported "The federal budget deficit was about $1.1 trillion in the first 10 months of fiscal year 2011...66 billion less than the roughly $1.2 trillion deficit incurred through July 2010." President Obama has tripled the size of President Bush's largest deficits. But for Tuesday's paper, The Washington Post and reporter Zachary Goldfarb plucked out this voter from Obama's bus tour stop in Cannon Falls, Minnesota to utterly ignore reality:

"I think he’s doing a good job. He inherited a very big deficit,” said Bob Sixta, a financial planner from Rochester.



The Washington Post's adjectives in Thursday's coverage of the Obama press conference signaled their approval. "Obama takes tougher tone on economy, foreign policy" was the headline at the top of Page One. Post reporters Peter Wallsten and Zachary Goldfarb led off with how Obama "belittled" congressional Republicans for taking vacations during debt-limit talks and contrasted their work effort with his young daughters. But his mission was to "reassert a commanding presence" on the issues. He was not "petulant" or "whiny," he was "showing a combative side that Americans rarely see."

The front-page promo underneath hailed Dana Milbank's "Washington Sketch" full of praise. "The pugilist in chief: A press corps gathered to hear our regularly scheduled president meets a rather feisty gentleman instead."



Last week I noted how the Washington Post published on page A5 a story about how Obama Treasury officials tried but failed to influence Standard & Poor's credit analysts from downgrading the U.S. government's credit outlook from "stable" to "negative."

Today the Post buried on page A14 a story by staffer Zachary Goldfarb about a House of Representatives investigation into the matter: