On Monday, the Associated Press launched a series of planned articles marking the 30th anniversary of former NASA scientist James Hansen's "opening salvo of the age of climate change," as Douglas Brinkley it. Seth Borenstein and Nicky Forster trumpeted how "we were warned" by Hansen's June 1988 congressional testimony, and underlined that "thirty years later, it’s clear that Hansen and other doomsayers were right." Borenstein also filed a glowing accompanying report about Hansen, which cited just one critic of the academic turned climate activist.



Seth Borenstein touted in a Tuesday report for the Associated Press that some scientists believe that Hurricane Harvey is a "soggy, record-breaking glimpse of the wet and wild future that global warming could bring." Even after acknowledging that these climate researchers are "quick to say that climate change didn't cause Harvey and...haven't determined yet whether the storm was made worse by global warming," Borenstein underlined that they believe that "warmer air and water mean wetter and possibly more intense hurricanes in the future."



A peer-reviewed research report published last week by three highly qualified researchers with the agreement of seven others similarly accomplished charges that the entities reporting historical and current worldwide temperatures have adjusted their data to show global warming which has not actually occurred. The trio has concluded that this data is "not a valid representation of reality," and that as a result, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's 2009 "Endangerment Finding" — essentially that global warming has been occurring and continues to accelerate due to human activity — is, in the study's words, "invalidated." The establishment media's silence has been deafening.



Seth Borenstein at the Associated Press and those pushing for radical wealth redistribution in the name of "climate change" just can't past their hysteria over President Donald Trump's unilateral decision to withdraw from the Paris Climate Accords. Trump's move reversed former President Barack Obama's unilateral decision to sign on. Borenstein's latest exercise in hyperbole on Thursday gave free publicity to a study which absurdly pretends to project the economic impact of alleged global warming over 80 years out. The study's authors appear not to realize that the allegedly frightening impacts they're projecting aren't intimidating at all.



On Thursday, the Associated Press played up the supposed impact of President Donald Trump's decision to the withdraw from the Paris climate accord by underlining that "some island states may not survive through the next 100 years." The wire service touted officials from some of these countries, along with several "experts," who predicted "catastrophic" effects on these nations.



Seth Borenstein's Saturday dispatch at the Associated Press on how it "Doesn’t look good for Earth" if the United States under President Trump "quits" the 2015 Paris climate is about as fakey as fake news gets. It's also sloppy and inconsistent in its terminology, and misleading about the nature and timing of what former President Obama's pledge would require the U.S. to do — while letting expanding greenhouse gas emitters like China off the hook.



This year's annual far-left environmentalist Earth Day events were repackaged as "The March for Science." On Monday, despite weekend events' obvious agenda, MSNBC's Stephanie Ruhle gleefully told viewers leading into a commercial break that "it wasn’t partisan," and that "the marches were apolitical."



The latest installment of the Associated Press's "Divided America" series on Monday focused on "climate change," aka "global warming."

Not surprisingly, even though there are only 17 percent of Americans (allegedly "the fastest-growing group," which seems doubtful given that getting to that tiny minority level has required at least a quarter-century) who "are alarmed by climate change and want action now," the AP's Seth Borenstein portrayed them most favorably, and burned a great deal of verbiage quoting outsiders trying to explain away climate skeptics as tribalists, conservatives and Tea Party types. He also accepted the supposedly settled climate science, which isn't settled at all, and ignored recent devlopments throwing the entire idea that the temperatures on earth will increase in the future into serious doubt.



From time to time over the past nine years, I have written about "globaloney," a shorthand term for the pseudo-science behind “climate change,” and “globalarmism” to describe the enviro-hysteria over "global warming" and the misguided public-policy prescriptions arising from that hysteria. Since the Paris climate talks have just begun, the press hysteria has reached a fever pitch.

At the Associated Press on Sunday, Seth Borenstein, swept up in that hysteria, wrote up a perfect example of "news" coverage embodying the essence of each term. We should be forever grateful that longtime skeptic Christopher Monckton, at the Watts Up With That blog, picked Borenstein apart, utterly destroying the AP reporter's work, piece by piece.



A story by Seth Borenstein at the Associated Press ("AP ANALYSIS: VW EVASION LIKELY LED TO DOZENS OF DEATHS"), originally published on Saturday but currently carrying a Monday morning time stamp, claimed that "Volkswagen's pollution-control chicanery" has been responsible for "killing between five and 20 people in the United States annually in recent years." Those results, based on an AP "statistical and computer analysis," "cleverly" recast the effort's raw results of "somewhere between 16 and 94 deaths over seven years."

Given how poorly supposedly sacrosanct computer models have done in predicting "global warming" trends, and how gullible journalists, especially Borenstein, have been all these years about them, it seemed quite wise to treat his VW "analysis" with caution. In an op-ed at Investor's Business Daily yesterday, Michael Fumento demonstrated that such skepticism was warranted.



In what appears to be a mixed result in the quest for clarity, the Associated Press has announced that its reporters and those who wish to adhere to its Stylebook guidelines will henceforth refer to those who don't worship at the altar of the global warming/climate change absolutists "doubters" instead of "deniers" and "skeptics."

The specific change reads as follows: "To describe those who don’t accept climate science or dispute the world is warming from man-made forces, use climate change doubters or those who reject mainstream climate science. Avoid use of skeptics or deniers."



In a report on the relative infrequency of hurricanes in the U.S. during the past decade nationwide, and many decades in certain coastal areas, the Associated Press's Seth Borenstein detected a problem.

The problem is that those who contend that human-caused global warming is ruining our planet believe that hurricane frequency should be increasing, but it's not. So Borenstein tried to cover his tracks (bolds are mine throughout this post):