On Tuesday morning, syndicated talk-radio host Chris Plante mocked "National Panhandler Radio" for having some seriously high salaries for a taxpayer-subsidized network that begs for listener donations in pledge drives. Plante cited tweets by Washington Post media reporter Paul Farhi from the latest IRS 990 form for nonprofits revealing the high salaries of NPR stars. Plante marveled first at Weekend Edition Saturday host Scott Simon, who is a one-day-a-week anchor and yet made $479,578 -- a 16 percent pay hike. 



NPR has a habit -- call it "counterintuitive" -- of trashing popular beliefs on major holidays (or holy days). On Good Friday in 2008, for example, NPR's Fresh Air rebroadcast a guest who trashed Christianity. On July 4, 2018, All Things Considered replayed a five-year-old interview suggesting the beloved patriotic song "God Bless America" annoys "many" with its "syrupy nationalism and trivialized faith," and Woody Guthrie suggested it was a "whitewash of everything that was wrong with America."



Wednesday's All Things Considered on NPR touted how a conservative portion of California supposedly needs ObamaCare to stay, despite the personal opposition of the people there. Robert Siegel played up that "a lot of people there have benefited from a law Republicans are trying to roll back — the Affordable Care Act, or ObamaCare." April Dembosky of local affiliate KQED spotlighted how "clinics in the northeast corner of the state are lobbying local officials to take an unpopular position in this conservative land: defend ObamaCare."



Wednesday's All Things Considered on NPR touted an eight-year-old boy who now dresses as a girl serving as an "educator" of sorts about transgenderism — first to his parents, and later to his neighbors and classmates. Correspondent Johnny Kauffman of Georgia affiliate WABE played up how "the city of Kennesaw, where the [boy's] family lives, is in one of the most conservative congressional districts in the country... [his] parents say they get a lot of questions from friends and other parents. But [he] remains the best teacher."



On Friday's All Things Considered, NPR anchor Robert Siegel began the "Week in Politics" segment with a serious focus on San Bernardino, but he "couldn't resist" creating a tag-team mockery of conservative presidential candidate Ben Carson for pronouncing Hamas like it rhymed with "Thomas." Like Morning Joe, these media elites wanted to claim he said "hummus," which is funnier.



During appearances on NPR’s All Things Considered and PBS NewsHour on Friday, the Washington Post’s E.J. Dionne and the New York Times’ David Brooks eagerly touted President Obama’s blatant decision to “politicize” the Oregon school shooting to push gun control. 



The birther issue is back. No, not the Obama birther crazies; the Ted Cruz birther crazies.

In an interview with National Public Radio (NPR) on Monday's All Things Considered, Sarah Duggin of the Catholic University of America’s Columbus School of Law claimed that Ted Cruz’s eligibility for the Presidency is not “an open-and-shut case” because “we don’t know precisely what the framers of the Constitution meant when they put into Article II that no person except a natural-born citizen shall be eligible to the office of president.”



New York Times columnist Paul Krugman has proclaimed in a 4000-plus-word Rolling Stone article that Barack Obama is one of the most successful presidents in American history. So it’s not surprising that liberal National Public Radio came calling for an interview that aired on Monday night’s All Things Considered.

Krugman’s overarching socialist narrative was that Obamacare is a Earth-shaking landmark, regardless of its popularity. Siegel unleashed an absolutely classic example of the liberal NPR weltanschaunng. A “major benefit” should be automatically, ideologically “welcomed” by the American people:



On Tuesday night’s All Things Considered, NPR anchor Robert Siegel awarded a seven-and-a-half minute interview to The New Republic and its editor, Franklin Foer. The magazine is celebrating its 100th anniversary with a new book called “Insurrections of the Mind.”

Siegel found time to ask about a Hendrik Hertzberg book review trashing Ronald Reagan as a “child monarch,” which he described as a “scathing and very amusing read.” He also brought up  a Henry Fairlie piece eviscerating George Will, which Siegel called “another very amusing piece.” But he never found time to discuss the New Republic’s enormous scandal with writer Stephen Glass's slew of wildly fabricated articles in the magazine from 1995 to 1998, memorialized in the movie "Shattered Glass.”



Talk about tone deaf at National Public Radio. On Thursday’s All Things Considered, NPR reporter Don Gonyea ran a segment on Governor Chris Christie (R-N.J.) traveling to New Hampshire to campaign with Scott Brown as he seeks to become the next senator from there. 

Unsurprisingly, the NPR reporter did his best to play up the “Bridgegate” controversy despite the Department of Justice clearing Christie of any wrongdoing in the 2013 George Washington Bridge lane closure scandal. The accompanying story on the NPR website blared “Will bridge scandal jam Gov. Christie’s road show?” 



NPR got in the spirit of anniversaries on Thursday night’s All Things Considered by recalling the 1964 Republican convention in San Francisco. For analysis, they turned to.....New York Times Magazine contributor Sam Tanenhaus, whose lack of political insight was proven by his 2009 book The Death of Conservatism (broadened from a 2009 New Republic essay titled "Conservatism Is Dead.")  Oopsy.

Tanenhaus told NPR anchor Robert Siegel that when Nelson Rockefeller tried to argue against “extremism” at the convention, leftist author Norman Mailer wrote it was like “one of those early moments at the dawn of civilization when one caveman stood off the others and said no, we have to be a civilized society.”



Sen. Rand Paul sat down with NPR anchor Audie Cornish on the January 29th All Things Considered, and from the moment the interview began, NPR’s listeners knew the likely outcome: a one-sided attack job.

Anchor Robert Siegel explained that while Cathy McMorris Rodgers gave the official GOP response, Sen. Mike Lee had a Tea Party response, and Paul had an online video response. Cornish began the interview by asking, “How do you convince the independent voter out there who sees this kind of mishmash of responses from various Republicans and no definitive agenda?”