During Inside Politics Thursday, host John King and the panel lost their minds about President Trump’s interview with George Stephanopoulos; where he suggested that if a foreign power came to him or someone on his campaign with information about his Democratic opponent, he would advise them to “listen” to the information they offered and “go maybe to the FBI” if something seemed sinister. Throughout the segment, King labeled the President as “un-American” and compared him to a toddler.



Tuesday afternoon on CNN, Inside Politics and CNN Right Now compared conservatives and Republicans nationwide seeking to advance pro-life legislation to the scandal-ridden Virginia Governor Ralph Northam (D) after he made his comments endorsing infanticide. Their rationale? Well, in both cases, those two sides found themselves “on the defensive.” Yes, really.



On Wednesday, Ohio State University released the “Report of the Independent Investigation” of “Sexual Abuse Committed by Dr. Richard Strauss,” who as a longtime athletics doctor abused over 175 male students from 1979 to 1996. The scandal became a national news story last year since Congressman Jim Jordan (R-OH) was an assistant wrestling coach from 1986 to 1994 after a career as a Buckeye student athlete. On Friday, Washington Post congressional reporter Paul Kane claimed that the report proved Jordan and fellow Buckeye officials knew of Strauss's abuses.



In an insanely biased and nutty tweet Friday afternoon, Washington Post congressional correspondent Paul Kane falsely claimed that “right-wing anger/mobs” caused deranged Tuscon, Arizona shooter Jared Lee Loughner to kill six and nearly assassinate then-Democratic Congresswoman Gabby Giffords.



The Washington Post sounded just like a Democratic Party rag, getting out a hanky at the news that Senate Minority Leader Harry Reid won’t run for re-election. The front-page headline was “Reid laying down gloves after 28 years in Senate: From hardscrabble childhood, he rose to pinnacle of power.” Inside, the headline was “Democrats’ master of manuever will not seek reelection in 2016.”

Post congressional correspondent Paul Kane tenderly eulogized Senator Reid as if he’d already passed away.



The Washington Post is positioning the Senate conservatives as “scary” in Monday’s editions. Online, the headline was “New Senate majority leader’s main goal for GOP: Don’t be scary.”

Liberal congressional reporter Paul Kane relayed that Democrats think that appeasing “far-right conservatives” will lead to Republican defeats in 2016:



Apparently, The Washington Post can’t use the word “liberal” without feeling slightly nauseous. Its coverage of the $1.1 trillion omnibus spending bill included a front-page story headllined “Democrats’ Warren wing sends message.”

Reporter Paul Kane waited until the story skipped to page A-20. On the front page, it was all “populist” euphemism



The liberal legend of Jon Stewart began with his October 15, 2004 appearance on CNN’s “Crossfire,” where he rhetorically sentenced the show to death. He proclaimed, “It’s hurting America. Here is what I wanted to tell you guys: Stop... You have a responsibility to the public discourse, and you fail miserably.”

CNN announced it was canceling the show two months later, as network president president Jon Klein told the New York Times "I agree wholeheartedly with Jon Stewart's overall premise."



Just like the Huffington Post underlined Rick Perry’s “big loss” on a Tesla plant, Saturday’s Washington Post highlighted “Christie loses Atlantic City bet” on an Atlantic City casino. The subheadline was "The casino hailed as a 'game-changer' by New Jersey's governor two years ago is shuttered, creating more problems for his possible 2016 presidential run."

But the front page of last Thursday’s Metro section carried this headline about potential Democratic presidential contender Martin O’Malley in Maryland: “The glitter-is-gold side of O’Malley’s legacy.” That came under a color photo of O’Malley taking a selfie at a casino opening in Baltimore.



Liberals are angry that President Obama won a second term, and yet they didn’t get the liberal agenda items they wanted passed in 2013, including gun control and amnesty for illegal aliens. The complaint at the end of the year is that this was the “least productive Congress” in 66 years, production always measured by the amount of legislation passed.

But the media complaint here isn’t about just any legislation. It’s about a liberal wish list. Washington Post reporter Paul Kane lamented the “shrunken ambitions” of congressional Democrats in a front-page story. “Back in 2009, during the heady days of hope and change, Sen. Sherrod Brown (D-Ohio) introduced 90 pieces of legislation. In 2013, amid gridlock and dysfunction, he sponsored just 35 bills. None of them became law.”



The Washington Post is painting the Tea Party as all “threat” and no benefit to the Republicans. Paul Kane’s Wednesday story is headlined “Tea party threat again hangs over Republicans’ efforts to take Senate.” Conservatives think some incumbents are “insufficiently strident” against Obama.

Kane played up several times how the GOP whiffed in “seemingly winnable” states with Tea Party candidates, demonstrating complete amnesia about how liberal national media outlets piled on the Angles, O’Donnells and Akins with partisan aggression.



When ultraliberal Henry Waxman ran the House Government Reform Committee, The Washington Post didn't often  suggest he was a fierce partisan or ideologue. Instead, former Washington Post managing editor Robert Kaiser praised him in a book review headlined "Moustache of Justice." (The Waxman lovers even have a mug.)

Kaiser cooed, “Henry Waxman is to Congress what Ted Williams was to baseball -- a natural....Waxman has been one of the most effective members of Congress for 35 years....This is the voice of David, whose career has featured the slaying of one Goliath after another.” This is not how the Post is treating Waxman’s "feverish" successor Darrell Issa.