In a string of disturbing tweets Thursday afternoon, Vox Senior Correspondent and co-founder Matthew Yglesias actually justified a mob of left-wing Antifa activists surrounding the home of Fox News anchor Tucker Carlson and terrorizing his family. Even as other journalists and pundits across the political spectrum condemned the incident, Yglesisas insisted that he “cannot empathize” with Carlson or his family.



Conservative attorney Gayle Trotter was invited to sit in the "conservative" analyst seat in NPR's Week in Politics segment on Friday's All Things Considered, and shocked anchor Audie Cornish by identifying socialist Democrat Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez as part of the "Venezuelan wing of the Democratic Party." Cornish said she had to "pause for that," and then laughed at her. It wasn't an "objective" laugh. 



Vox's senior corresponent is suffering from a horrible fear. He worries about Trump being successful with his North Korea policy to the extent that he is now suffering from a mental meltdown.



Not all liberal media outlets are giving favorable coverage to former FBI Director James Comey's new book, A Higher Loyalty. One such media source is Vox which reminds its readers about why most liberals were clamoring for Comey to be fired...right up to the moment when President Donald Trump actually did fire him.



NPR's Friday night broadcast of All Things Considered offered two younger pundits in their Week in Review segment -- on the left, Vox editor and co-founder Matthew Yglesias and on the right, Rachael Larimore of The Weekly Standard. Both were critical of Trump and professed some shock and fatigue at how Trump dominates the news. But when anchor Ari Shapiro asked about overlooked stories of 2017, even the lefty admitted that the media probably under-emphasized the crushing of ISIS in Trump's first year: 



On Tuesday, Talking Points Memo's Josh Marshall called the bill "a heist," while Vox's Matthew Yglesias charged that "moral and political responsibility for the looting ultimately rests on the shoulders of the GOP members of Congress who decided that the appropriate reaction to Trump’s inauguration was to start smashing and grabbing as much as possible for themselves and their donors rather than uphold their constitutional obligations."



HOORAY! We lost again!!! A reliable source of humor after Democrats lose elections is Vox writer Matthew Yglesias. A month ago Matthews was celebrating the loss of the democrat in the Montana special congressional election by declaring his loss to really mean a win for democrats. Yglesias continued mining this political comedy vein by declaring that the loss of Jon Ossoff in the George 6th Congressional District special election, after the party blew over $30 million on his campaign, really means that the "Republicans are in trouble."

 



HOORAY! We lost!!! That is becoming the laughable mainstream media theme about many special elections since President Donald Trump's victory last November. We saw this happen in early March when Politico hailed Democrat performances in special elections despite the fact that there was no net change. The latest iteration of celebrating participation trophies, and likely to be repeated by mainstream media sources,  comes by way of the May 26 edition of Vox in which Matthew Yglesias declared that the loss by the Democrat candidate in the congressional special election was beyond mere good news for the Democrats. In fact the Vox headline acclaimed that Republicans' win in last night's Montana election is great news for Democrats:

 



This past Tuesday, three prominent left-wing writers examined Paul Ryan’s health-care bill; what they see as the typical Republican attitude toward health insurance; and the modern GOP as a whole. Unsurprisingly, they found all three wanting. For example, Talking Points Memo editor and publisher Josh Marshall contended that on occasions like this that call for wonkery, Republicans are ill-equipped to deliver it, inasmuch as they’ve “spent years since 2008 (actually before but especially since 2008) stoking their base with increasingly fantastical and ridiculous claims.”



It all started with an ignorant tweet by Vox's Matt Yglesias, who falsely claimed that "It's impressive that the IRS never leaks." The New York Times's Nick Kristof, apparently unaware or indifferent to the fact that he was simultaneously engaging in breathtaking hypocrisy and playing with fire, saw an opportunity to advertise his paper's law-subverting services, and tweeted the paper's physical address to those who are "in IRS and have a certain president's tax return that you'd like to leak."



CPAC, currently going on just outside the Beltway in National Harbor, Maryland, has changed along with the conservative movement, believes Matthew Yglesias. Old-school CPAC, Yglesias contended in a Wednesday piece, was philosophically driven, populated by the sort of activists who “helped [Ronald] Reagan mount a primary challenge to incumbent President Gerald Ford.” In the past fifteen-plus years, however, it has become “to a substantial extent a live version of the conservative entertainment experience that one could also get on cable or on the radio.” In other words, it's now Donald Trump's CPAC, which “reflect[s] the reality” that conservatives are “older, whiter, and less educated than the population at large and [are] filled with a keen sense of nostalgia for the good old days.”



In a Christmas Day post, Digby (also a columnist for Salon) contended that, given the media’s hostility toward Hillary Clinton, that “it’s actually a testament to her rectitude that [the e-mail story] was all they came up with. They had certainly tried over the course of 25 years to come up with something real and they ended up having to make up this ridiculous fake scandal to justify their Javert-like obsession.” To Digby, Hillary was an even more inviting target for the media than her scandal-prone husband: “After all, she was always the uppity one who was asking for it, not good old Bill. They didn't get the indictment they were promised but the FBI did manage to be the instrument of her destruction so it's almost as good.”