On Tuesday's Inside Politics, CNN host John King harrumphed about President Trump playing golf on Labor Day while Hurricane Dorian was over the Bahamas. "The president played golf yesterday, provoking considerable backlash and accusations he is not spending enough time worrying about the hurricane." Then King played a pile of clips from 2016 of Trump mocking Obama for golfing and insisting he wouldn't do that so much if he were elected. The tone was different when Obama golfed right after a statement about ISIS murdering journalist James Foley 



During Inside Politics Thursday, host John King and the panel lost their minds about President Trump’s interview with George Stephanopoulos; where he suggested that if a foreign power came to him or someone on his campaign with information about his Democratic opponent, he would advise them to “listen” to the information they offered and “go maybe to the FBI” if something seemed sinister. Throughout the segment, King labeled the President as “un-American” and compared him to a toddler.



An hour after he trumpeted Thursday’s abrupt end of the second U.S.-North Korea summit, CNN chief White House correspondent Jim Acosta appeared in need of a safe space following President Trump’s Hanoi press conference. Acosta wasn’t called on, so he aired his grievances on CNN while falsely suggesting the President had “steered clear largely” of the White House press corps.



During Tuesday’s New Day, the CNN panel discussed President Trump’s treatment of ABC reporter Cecilia Vega during Monday's press conference in the Rose Garden and specifically whether or not his “snide comment” towards her was a result of sexism. CNN political analyst Brian Karem used his platform on the network’s flagship morning program to refer to President Trump as a “sexist, egotistical, lying, hypocritical bigot.”



According to a new Media Research Center study, 90 percent of the President’s coverage in 2018 has been negative. However, that hasn’t stopped journalists about whining about the President limiting press freedom. What happened when Barack Obama actually did that? Nothing. 



To be vulgar once earned societal disapproval, ostracism from polite company and -- in my grandmother's era — put a young person in danger of having his mouth washed out with soap. Today, vulgarities are now mainstream. People speaking in a way that "would make a sailor blush" are now on primetime television and words once frowned upon in polite society are now a part of what was once known as cordial conversation.



The liberal media was in damage control mode on Sunday after the disgusting comedic performance by Michelle Wolf at the White House Correspondents’ Dinner fell so flat with the public that it left many journalists backpedaling themselves. It was the first topic of discussion on CNN’s Reliable Sources as host Brian Stelter questioned White House Correspondents’ Association President Margaret Talev about Wolf’s act. And when asked, Talev refused to say whether not she thought the “jokes” crossed a line.



New York Times Michael Grynbaum’s latest paranoid attack on President Trump’s harsh criticism of the media appeared in Tuesday’s paper, “In Age of Trump, Political Reporters Are Under Attack, and in Demand.” Once again, Grynbaum found a threat in the term “fake news,” which originated as a mainstream media attack on false pro-Trump Facebook posts, but has since been appropriated by Trump, to the media’s chagrin:



Since Thursday, the liberal media had been having a field day attacking President Trump when it was leaked that he had slammed certain counties for being undesirable places to live. Since then, CNN has been the banner carrier for those eager to pass opinion off as news and call the President a racist with impunity. On Sunday’s Inside Politics, CNN host John King was no different as he led a panel of journalists in anti-Trump smears while claiming to know exactly what racist thoughts were in his head.



On Sunday's This Week show on ABC, host Jonathan Karl and Bloomberg News's Margaret Talev displayed stunning historical naivete in characterizing the tax cuts for individuals in the tax law signed several days ago by President Trump as "temporary."



Timothy Egan at the New York Times is so enamored of the mythology surrounding Barack Obama that he claimed in a Friday column that the 44th President's rhetoric "was the best American music" which "celebrated" a United States where, in Egan's words, "people from all races, ideologies and religious sects would check their hatreds at the door after becoming citizens." He pretended that the nation's current identity-driven divisions are all due to current President Donald Trump.



Seconds after President Trump’s Monday remarks finally calling out the KKK, neo-Nazis, and white supremacists by name, CNN hosts and panelists made clear that there was nothing Trump could have said that would have satisfied them, excoriating him for not going far enough and announcing “policy in terms of addressing this.”