The latest New York Times Sunday Review was graced by Justin Gillis, who served as chief environmental reporter for the paper until late 2017 and is now a contributing opinion writer free to spout in even more partisan and hysterical tones about the “troglodytes” and dangerous deniers who don’t see impending climate catastrophe: “Our Climate Future Has Arrived.” The online headline deck was a call to vote Democrat: “Fire, Floods and Power Outages: Our Climate Future Has Arrived -- The most urgent imperative now is to turn our fear and frustration into votes.” The tone was confidently alarmist: "Now we suffer the consequences."



The New York Times' lead story Thursday proved that its newish alarmist environmental reporter Kendra Pierre-Louis is a worthy successor to the paper’s previous alarmist environmental reporter, Justin Gillis, in “Emissions Surge, Hastening Perils Across The Globe – 2 New Warming Studies – Rising Greenhouse Gases Likened to ‘Speeding Freight Train.’” The lead sentence was even more histrionic than the left-wing Huffington Post’s take, which treated the carbon report as bad news but didn’t engage in wild extrapolation the way Pierre-Louis and her headline writer did.



Justin Gillis, former activist and alarmist Times environmental reporter, returned to the opinion page to continue his mission against emissions and to mark the 30th anniversary of NASA scientist and climate scold James Hansen’s jeremiad to Congress on global warming (now repurposed as “climate change”): “He Was Right About The Climate.”



In Sunday’s New York Times, the paper’s departing prophet of environmental doom, er reporter, Justin Gillis answered 17 questions under the heading “Your Questions About Climate Change, Answered.” Here’s a slice of Gillis’s confidently alarmist Q&A with himself, with leading questions answered with unjustified certitude -- just like in his previous “climate change” articles. He got really apocalyptic with his dire prophecies: "If greenhouse gas emissions continue unchecked, scientists say, the global warming could ultimately exceed 8 degrees Fahrenheit, which would undermine the planet’s capacity to support a large human population."



The New York Times’ most activist environmental reporter Justin Gillis is leaving the paper, but not before one last Cassandra-style wail on the front of the Science section keyed to the recent major hurricanes that have hit the South: “The Unpredictable Human Factor.” Gillis, who has a knack for getting scary yet inaccurate stories on the paper’s front page, employed a condescending “told you so” tone apparently endemic to environmentalists. And another reporter's front-page story from Miami blamed low taxes and Republicans for the destruction waged by the likes of Hurricane Irma.



In Sunday’s New York Times, the paper’s most activist environmental reporter Justin Gillis, who has a knack for getting scary yet inaccurate stories on the paper’s front page, delivered a condescending lecture to the effect that if you believe an eclipse will occur on Monday, then you’d better believe everything “science” tells you about “climate change” as well, in “Should You Trust Climate Science? Maybe the Eclipse Is a Clue.” It’s the latest climate change article from the Times evidently written for children. 



Downplaying its hallowed veneration of “science” for the sake of climate alarmism, the New York Times used the story of a huge iceberg which broke off this week from the Larsen C ice shelf on the Antarctic Peninsula as an excuse to warm up the “climate change” machine. Climate reporter Justin Gillis, who has a long record of alarmist, activist reporting on this issue, and Jugal Patel made the most of the opportunity under the tilted headline “Antarctica Sheds Huge Iceberg That Hints at Future Calamity.” That despite the scientific consensus that this particular collapse was not connected to global warming



New York Times reporter Justin Gillis is a man on a mission to save the planet from the depredations of global warming (rebranded as “climate change”). The activist environmental reporter was at it again in the paper’s Tuesday Science section, “Cooling Language About a Warming Earth" (too ideological even for the news pages?). Gillis, who regularly pushes the idea of a looming environmental apocalypse in the Times’ newspages, has a bad habit of taking the front page to declare warming “records” which may not or do not actually exist, and then not deigning to explain the discrepancies, which apparently don’t matter to the “ordinary reader” anyway.



"The trip began a day before the election, and Mr. Kerry had confidently predicted a Hillary Clinton victory."

Ah! It was the best of times, it was the best of times. Not a hint that anything could possibly ruin the upbeat mood of what was essentially an Election Day victory lap by Secretary of State John Kerry and his merry band of liberals to the bottom of the world. Fortunately, for the eternal amusement of posterity, New York Times science reporter Justin Gillis was on hand to record the tragicomic scene. First let us begin as he notes the jubilant visitors touring Antarctica avant le déluge orange:



The New York Times' coverage of the international climate change summit in Paris remained on an aggressive boil, as Coral Davenport and Gardiner Harris' report from France Tuesday, "Citing Urgency, World Leaders Converge on France for Climate Meeting," hit the same set of alarmist notes Davenport did in her previous story from Paris. And Justin Gillis, the paper's most alarmist environmental reporter, accused libertarians and conservatives of bad faith, taking funding from Big Oil, and "cherry-picking" data under the headline "Why do people question climate change? -- Hint: ideology."



Hyperbole much? The New York Times brought predictably alarmist and overheated coverage to the climate talks in Paris, while lauding President Obama's attempt to make a legacy fighting "global warming." Environmental Reporter Coral Davenport gushed: "On Sunday night he arrives in Paris, hoping to make climate policy the signature environmental achievement of his, and perhaps any, presidency." In a later story she warned "If the talks fail...then nations will continue on a trajectory that scientists say locks the planet into a future of rising sea levels, more frequent floods, worsening droughts, food and water shortages, destructive hurricanes and other catastrophic events."



The New York Times featured more politicized environmentalist doom-mongering from Justin Gillis, the paper's chief alarmist, in "2015 Likely to Be Hottest Year on Record." Of course, the year isn't over yet, but that less-than-compelling news hook didn't stop Gillis from going beyond the stats to work in alarmist environmental and anti-"denialist" political points, while dismissing the inconvenient truth that temperature growth has stalled since 1998. Gillis has made a habit of establishing "historic" warming levels and pollution records that turn out to be rather less than they initially appear.