Left-wing filmmaker Josh Fox launched his latest film, Awake, a Dream from Standing Rock, online April 22 — after it premiered at the Tribeca Film Festival.

Predictably, liberal media including Reuters, The Washington Post and The Hollywood Reporter heralded the movie and ignored inaccuracies of his earlier, biased documentaries attacking the oil and gas industry. The film was called “timely,” and “powerful.” Fox was even credited for his “deep understanding of pipelines” and for getting in the way of the indigenous people telling their story.



Flaming tap water made for compelling imagery and anti-fracking activists and news media used it to make drilling for natural gas look dangerous. But a new study reported by the Denver Post further undermined such claims.



The tiny northern Pennsylvania town of Dimock has been the site of a battle over natural gas drilling for several years. Some residents claimed the drilling contaminated their water, and they sued Cabot Oil & Gas in a battle that gained national news attention.

Test after test failed to find fracking contaminants in the water, something the lawyer for those Dimock residents just admitted in court.



Conservative filmmaker Phelim McAleer has a new film challenging Josh Fox and his claims about hydraulic fracturing. McAleer’s GasHoax will be released on October 1, the same day as Fox’s latest short film, GasWork, will be aired on MSNBC.

The head-to-head match up is intentional. McAleer said GasWork is “a zero credibility film because it comes from filmmaker Josh Fox who has a history of health hoaxes regarding fracking.” He has criticized Fox for his past claims about flammable water and breast cancer links, calling them “nonsense.”



Don’t falsely accuse people who host their own TV shows. Anti-fracking activist and filmmaker Josh Fox was kicked off Varney & Co. Monday, June 8 after he accused host Stuart Varney of lying.

Fox, the producer and director of the factually-challenged Gasland documentaries, criticized Varney’s opposition to fracking. Fox was the target of today’s Varney segment with filmmaker Phelim McAleer.  



Watch out, because greedy businessmen might start fracking under your neighborhood, making your drinking water flammable and causing earthquakes.

The popular, animated satire “The Simpsons” made fun of hydraulic fracturing on its November 2 episode. More commonly called fracking, hydraulic fracturing is a process used to extract natural gas from shale buried deep underground. However, the show portrayed it as the dangerous venture of devious capitalists.



Yesterday, Slate promoted to their front page a July 19 article promising a look at “what fracking really looks like.”  David Rosenberg's piece about the photos taken by New York-based documentary photographer Nina Berman seems to rehash the frivolous narrative that fracking will turn your bathroom into the devil's water closet, complete with fountains of flame! 

Liberals – and their allies on the environmental left – must’ve missed the EPA report showing that fracking doesn’t pollute surrounding groundwater.  But why go with facts when fiction is so much more melodramatic, particularly with the new release of Josh Fox’s latest anti-fracking documentary Gasland Part II.



Director and provocateur Josh Fox is confident “There is no safe drilling” and has made two of what The New York Times called “muckraking documentaries” crusading against the practice of hydraulic fracturing or “fracking.” His movies are powerful propaganda rife with misleading or inaccurate claims and leave little to no room for the other side.

“Gasland Part II” barely acknowledged there is another side. Even the Times TV review of the movie (aired on HBO July 9) said, “Would it have been a bad idea to include at least one interview with a homeowner who professes to support drilling?” In the film, Josh Fox ridiculously said that he had traveled all over this country and to others and “nobody” wanted gas drilling. If “nobody” wanted it, there wouldn’t be gas wells on private property throughout Pennsylvania. Perhaps he should have checked out “FrackNation,” a competing documentary.



HBO’s Bill Maher once again made a fool of himself on national television Friday.

After making the truly absurd comment during a discussion about hydraulic fracturing, "How anyone with children defends contaminated water I’ll never know,” the Real Time host was thoroughly smacked down by economist Niall Ferguson (video follows with transcribed highlights and commentary):



Explosions and fires are a common feature of today’s fictional movies as heroes dodge bullets and conflagrations in pursuit of justice. That might explain why opponents of hydraulic fracturing (or fracking) have decided to dramatize their case against scientific progress by lighting water on fire and then falsely blaming fracking for the blaze.

Thanks to a new film called FrackNation (watch it tonight at 9 pm ET on the AXS cable channel), Americans who have been subjected to such shady journalism will finally get a chance to see the full picture.



Contaminated water, health problems, and now … earthquakes? Fracking, a way to get natural gas out of layers deep within the earth, has been blamed for it all and the liberal news media have been consistently against the method, rarely showing supporters or mentioning any upside of the process.

Hydraulic fracturing, more commonly known as fracking, is a technique used to get natural gas out of the ground. It’s not new technology — the first use of hydraulic fracturing was actually in 1947 (according to a textbook on Rock Mechanics), but this process has come under fire from the left and the media in the past two years especially.