New York Times Magazine staff writer Jonathan Mahler and media reporter Jim Rutenberg teamed on a colossal, three-part investigation of Rupert Murdoch’s family drama and media empire that served as a hit piece on Fox News. The Times offensively attempted to tie the network to recent anti-Jewish and anti-Muslim terrorist attacks: "...some Fox News hosts and guests had been moving ever closer to openly embracing the most bigoted sentiments of the white-nationalist movement. A few days before the anti-Semitic attack on a Pittsburgh synagogue that killed 11 Jewish worshipers, a guest on Lou Dobbs’s show had said that a migrant caravan headed to the United States border from Honduras was being funded by the “Soros-occupied State Department.”



New York Times Magazine staff writer Jonathan Mahler and media reporter Jim Rutenberg teamed on a colossal, three-part investigation of Rupert Murdoch’s media empire (and family drama), using the mogul’s sale of his 21st Century Fox empire to Walt Disney as the catalyst for an incredibly noxious hit piece on Fox News, which is accused of virtually everything wrong with the world. The tone is amazingly ideological and personally hostile, perhaps the most virulent and conspiracy-minded attack on Fox News ever issued by the paper, certainly the longest one, against some stiff competition. It reads more like a paranoid left-wing screed from The Nation or In These Times than it does content for an objective newspaper.



New York City Mayor Bill de Blasio played make-believe during his Wednesday Morning Joe appearance, and everyone else present let him do so without challenge. Hizzoner's deepest dive into fantasyland was his contention that he can raise the money needed to repair and improve Gotham's decrepit subway system by "taxing millionaires and billionaires," which would only raise about 5 percent of the money needed.



Columnist Paul Krugman, respected economist turned Hillary acolyte, leaned into his conspiratorial tendencies in his Monday column, “How to Rig an Election.” Plus the Times lashed out at Trump-Pence’s “brand of right-wing nationalism” on the front page, portrayed Trump as Neidermeyer in “Animal House,” and celebrated Hillary dancing joyfully in the rain.



Thursday’s New York Times provided a long, unfriendly article by Jonathan Mahler on the government watchdog group Judicial Watch, under a dismissive headline: “Group’s Path on Clinton: Sue Early and Often – Judicial Watch Is a Foil That Won’t Quit.” The nonprofit legal group is doing the investigative legwork on Hillary Clinton that the liberal media won’t do, and the media won’t forgive them for it: "

Judicial Watch was one of the Clintons’ original tormentors, a charter member of what Mrs. Clinton famously called a 'vast right-wing conspiracy' to destroy her and her husband by seizing on any potential scandal. The organization filed its first lawsuit against the Clintons shortly after its formation in 1994, and it pretty much never stopped."



On the front of Saturday’s New York Times, reporters Jonathan Mahler and Maggie Haberman shed hypocritical tears over the risks to Rudy Giuliani’s “legacy” -- one the paper has spent over a decade doing its best to slur. The former New York City Mayor oversaw a record plunge in city homicides, led the city through 9-11, and currently advocates for Donald Trump. That last detail was the key to “Giuliani Role Risks Legacy To Aid Trump.” Post-9-11, the Times has rarely acknowledged the “legacy” of the former mayor to be anything but Hillary-hating and race-baiting



In columns, blogs, and front-page stories, the New York Times continues to edge left-wing firebrand Bernie Sanders out the door, apparently to clear a path for Hillary Clinton to gain the Democratic nomination as painlessly as possible. Columnist Paul Krugman is a reliably partisan hater of Republicans and cheerleader for Democrats, and he’s been enraging “Bernie Bros” for quite a while on his blog. Last week two entries, one under the loaded headline “Questions of Character.” And he’s not talking about Hillary:

 



The New York Times on Friday and Saturday let its readers know that the Republicans were getting what they deserved for pandering to right-wing extremism and xenophobia, while Hillary Clinton had successfully gained the sensible center. Friday’s lead editorial, “The G.O.P.’s Monster in the Mirror,” began with a little implied Trumpian vulgarity, then smeared the two Republican senators in the presidential race as extremist. Paul Krugman doubled down, calling the field racist, while Ted Cruz was heckled and Hillary Clinton hailed on Saturday's front page



New York Times media reporter Jonathan Mahler indulged in a celebration of a rival paper, the New York Daily News, and its recent hard turn to the left, as shown in the tabloid’s spurt of vulgar anti-conservative headlines – like the one calling NRA president Wayne LaPierre a terrorist – that have gone viral on social media, in “Drop Dead? Not The Newly Relevant Daily News." Mahler took us inside the liberal hive mind, buzzing with giddy self-congratulation over yet another puerile attack on Republicans, while dutifully reprinting the controversial covers that made liberals go giddy



New York Times reporter Jonathan Mahler covered the damning indictment of Rolling Stone magazine's story of a gang rape at the University of Virginia, but skipped his own paper's disgraceful coverage of a previous campus rape hoax -- involving the Duke lacrosse team in 2006.



Dinesh D’Souza’s new movie was finally noticed in The New York Times Friday – on the front page. The news story was “Heady Summer, Fateful Fall for a Conservative Firebrand.” Notice how “fall” had two meanings?

The Times has failed to notice Michael Moore’s nasty divorce and how his hypocrisy about wealth has been revealed. But D’Souza is front-page fodder mostly for his admitted violation of campaign-finance laws:



Will Herman Cain ever catch on that certain subjects -- such as the alleged sanctity of Anita Hill's sexual harassment allegations against then-Supreme Court nominee Clarence Thomas -- are no joking matter? (video and audio clips after page break)