The Washington Post’s owner reportedly urged fellow billionaire Michael Bloomberg to run for president. Just don’t expect to see that admitted often by The Post. A LexisNexis search revealed that The Post ran at least 122 stories (a mix of news and opinion) that mentioned Bloomberg’s potential candidacy or actual bid for the White House between Nov. 9, 2019, and Dec. 9, 2019.



With the liberal media unable to vocalize on camera their spin while Supreme Court nominee Brett Kavanaugh was testifying Thursday afternoon, many took to Twitter to voice their displeasure with the “Angry Kavanaugh,” calling him a “belittled marginalized white man” who, based on his summer of lifting weights, assaulted Dr. Christine Blasey Ford.



With the battle over the Iran deal heating up, Hillary Clinton’s e-mail troubles growing more severe, and more footage of Planned Parenthood’s callous harvesting of the organs of dead children coming to light, you would think the liberal print media would have their hands full. Rather than dwell on these stories, however, James Hohmann of the Washington Post decided that a much more important question demands our attention: is Ted Cruz eligible to run president?



Politico surveyed a "bipartisan group of key activists, operatives and thought leaders in New Hampshire and Iowa" to reveal "grave concerns about Cruz’s electability." A "bipartisan" group? Does this mean that Politico actually consulted Democrats to weigh in on Ted Cruz's changes in the early primaries? Yeah, there is an "unbiased" group for you. However, the really significant news from the Politico article written by James Hohmann comes deep into the story after many paragraphs of unrelenting Cruz bashing where it is revealed that "Nearly two-thirds of Iowa Republican insiders believe Cruz can win the caucuses."



Curtis Houck at NewsBusters noted late Thursday that on that evening’s NBC Nightly News, incumbent Louisiana Democratic Senator Mary Landrieu told NBC's Chuck Todd that President Barack Obama is unpopular in the South because the region “has not always been the friendliest place for African-Americans” and thus “[i]t’s been a difficult time for the President to present himself in a very positive light as a leader." Landrieu also said that "It’s not always been a good place for women to present ourselves. It’s more of a conservative place."

Houck described the race-based portion of Landrieu's lament as a "gaffe." The Senator apparently disagrees, as she doubled down on both aspects of her "woe is me" remarks in a statement today. Politico's James Hohmann waited an incredible 11 paragraphs to get into her embarrassing double-down:



In covering the latest debate between incumbent Wisconsin Republican Governor Scott Walker and Democratic challenger Mary Burke, the Politico's James Hohmann significantly understated the number of jobs added in the Badger State during Walker's tenure.

Hohmann wrote that "Burke attacked Walker for his 'broken promise' to create 250,000 private sector jobs during his first term. He’s now at a little over 100,000." That's only true if you think that 126,000 is only "a little over" 100,000:



James Hohmann of Politico reported on a "nearly million-dollar" ad buy by Planned Parenthood against two Republican Senate challengers who are "taking heat for their strident opposition to abortion."

It's apparently not "strident" when the Democratic incumbents they're challenging get 100-percent ratings from the "pro-choice" crowd.



Former Florida Republican Governor Charlie won the state's Democratic gubernatorial primary tonight.

In his writeup on Crist's defeat of an overmatched challenger, the Politico's James Hohmann wrote that "Only four years ago Crist was a governor who had run for office as a rock-ribbed conservative." That wording is a bit too clever. One might argue that Hohmann is merely claiming that Crist ran as a "conservative" in 2006 on the coattails Jeb Bush's successful and largely conservative previous eight years as Florida's governor. But Crist certainly didn't flaunt the label, and by mid-2007 it was obvious that he was governing as a "Schwarzenegger-style Republican moderate" — making it clear that any campaign claim to being genuinely conservative was a false front. Excerpts follow the jump (bolds are mine):



No website outdoes the Politico when it comes to looking at the world through Beltway-stereotyping glasses. A post this morning on Republican congressmen and senators' views towards attacking Syria exemplifies that outlook.

Apparently, in the fevered minds of Alex Isenstadt and James Hohmann, a GOP lawmaker learning about any idea to intervene militarily automatically salivates at the prospect and shuts down all critical thinking processes. The Politico pair are puzzled at how so many of them can possibly be opposed to President Obama's proposed Syria intervention. It's really not that hard, guys, if you abandon your stereotypes and do some thinking yourselves for a change. Excerpts follow the jump (bolds are mine):



In a story appearing this morning at the Politico about the Department of Justice's broad and unannounced subpoenas of the April and May 2012 personal and business phone records of reporters and editors at the Associated Press involving 20 phone lines and involving over 100 reporters and editors, James Hohmann found several "veteran prosecutors" who aren't necessarily outraged by what most members of the press and several watchdog groups have declared a blatant overreach. Instead, Hohmann summarizes their "far more measured response" as: "It’s complicated."

Hohmann utterly ignored a May 15 Washington Post story which chronicled claimed discussions between AP and government officials. Ultimately, it appears that the Obama administration's Department of Justice under Eric Holder may have only gone after AP out of spite because the wire service refused to accommodate administration requests to allow it time to crow about foiling a terrorist plot before the story gained meaningful visibility, and not because the release of the story, especially after what appears to have been an appropriate and negotiated delay, represented a genuine security risk. One obvious unanswered question is why DOJ waited, according to the AP's Mark Sherman in his original story, until "earlier this year" to obtain the phone records if it was so darned important to find out who the alleged leaker was.



"GOP rejects rape exception in platform," blared a Politico headline yesterday. "Even as Mitt Romney sought to quash the furor surrounding Todd Akin’s 'legitimate' rape comments, the Republican platform committee here approved an abortion plank that includes no exemptions for rape, incest or even to save the life of the mother," James Hohmann noted in the lead paragraph of his August 21 story.

"On Tuesday, not one of the 100-plus members on the GOP platform committee introduced amendments. They kept the identical language from 2004 and 2008," Hohmann groused, comporting to the media's quadrennial fixation on how the GOP is supposedly too extremely pro-life. By contrast, as I noted yesterday, the 15-person Democratic platform committee -- one member of which is NARAL Pro-Choice America's president -- earlier this month stubbornly refused to mildly soften their party's stringent pro-choice abortion plank. Politico, of course, failed to cover that controversy.



At the Politico, James Hohmann's biography page indicates that he is "an Honors graduate of Stanford University" who "studied American political history." I hope he skipped class during the time his profs covered the 1990s, because if not, he and many other classmates have been badly misled.

Hohmann covered Bill Clinton's commemoration of the twentieth anniversary of his presidential candidacy announcement at his library in Little Rock, Arkansas, and let the following Clintonian howlers go by without challenge: