CNN New Day hosts Alisyn Camerota and John Berman got a kick out of New York Times columnist Gail Collins inviting NYT readers to “vote” for the “worst” Trump cabinet member, on Monday's show. While the CNN hosts gushed over the “reality tv show” “contest” that bashed the administration, Collins marveled at how much liberal readers hated the Republican cabinet.



Our friend Brent Scher at the Washington Free Beacon noted that the New York Times editorial board has a funny double standard on recounts: North Carolina’s Republican governor Pat McCrory is a pathetic whiner to contest the results, but recounts for Hillary don’t require comment...except for a Monday grumblefest titled “Donald Trump’s Lies About the Popular Vote.”

Green Party presidential nominee Jill Stein’s demand for presidential recounts in three states will cost millions of dollars for no effect, but the Times is more upset about the man they call “North Carolina’s Sore Loser."



Uh oh. Ted Cruz is really in trouble with the New York Times now, after attacking Donald Trump for saying people should be able to use the restroom of whatever gender they now identify with. On the trail in Indiana, reporter Trip Gabriel took time out of his packed schedule to deliver a condescending lecture to the ignorant locals about transgenders in “Cruz, in Indiana, Attacks Trump for Supporting Transgender Rights.” Columnist Gail Collins piled on: "Ted Cruz continues to astound. Every time it appears he can’t get more awful, he finds a new avenue, like a ground mole sniffing out a beetle."



Hopefully they'll wait till the plane lands . . . New York Times reporters should be thrown off the Trump plane. That's what Steve Schmidt and Joe Scarborough said on today's Morning Joe. Via a Gail Collins column in the Times and in conversations with BuzzFeed EIC Ben Smith, portions of Donald Trump's ostensibly off-the-record interview with the Times' editorial board in January were leaked. 

Said Schmidt: "if I was running the Donald Trump campaign, every New York Times reporter on that plane would be off of it until and unless they clarify the attributional policies of the newspaper." Seconded Scarborough: "every single New York Times reporter should be kicked off the plane, should not be given press access--anything--until the editor of the New York Times editor explains to the candidate and explains to the readers exactly what happened here."



Washington Post political correspondent Chris Cillizza spent way too much time claiming the personal political views of David Letterman were some kind of mystery. The headline was "Is David Letterman liberal? It's surprisingly hard to say." No. It's not. Cillizza does this despite mentioning the Geoffrey Dickens Top Ten list of liberal outbursts posted at NewsBusters. Cillizza does this despite noting he donated more than $12,000 to electing Democrat Al Franken to the U.S. Senate.



It took well over 24 hours, but the New York Times finally corrected (HT Instapundit) op-ed columnist Gail Collins's ignorant Saturday contention about how Wisconsin Governor Scott Walker caused teacher layoff in 2010: "As well as the fact that those layoffs happened because Walker cut state aid to education." Collins was so sure of herself that she emphasized how Walker's 2010 state aid-caused layoffs were a "fact." Trouble is, Walker didn't become Badger State Governor until January 2011.

Instapundit's reaction: "So basically, it’s now an Emily Litella column. Never mind!" The Old Gray Lady's excision from Collins's cranky column hardly solves all of its problems.



What an ironic title New York Times op-ed columnist and former editorial page editor Gail Collins used — "Scott Walker Needs an Eraser" — in her February 13 opinion piece blasting Wisconsin's Republican governor.

In her nitpicky, selective mind, Walker must already have an eraser, one that's so powerful that it could reach back to the year before he became Badger State chief executive and eliminate teachers' jobs (bolds are mine throughout this post):



There is no right-of-center politician who has become a hero to journalists for their passionate rhetoric on behalf of conservatism, but former New York Governor Mario Cuomo was a hero to reporters precisely because of his ideology and the capability with which he espoused it.



The New York Times liberal columnists (redundant?), given a night to marinade in the bitterness of enormous losses on every level of government for the Democrats, responded with various shades of bile, bias, and unconvincing happy talk.



On her 12 p.m. ET hour show on MSNBC Monday, host Andrea Mitchell accused former NSA and CIA director Michael Hayden of being sexist simply for criticizing Senator Dianne Feinstein's slanted Intelligence Committee report condemning the interrogation of terror suspects under the Bush administration. [Listen to the audio or watch the video after the jump]

Mitchell played a clip of Hayden questioning the credibility of the report on Fox News Sunday, where he cited Washington Post columnist David Ignatius: "He said that Senator Feinstein wanted a report so scathing that it would 'ensure that an un-American brutal program of detention and interrogation would never again be considered or permitted.' Now that sentence, that motivation for the report...may show deep emotional feeling on the part of the Senator, but I don't think it leads you to an objective report."



Politico’s Katie Glueck reported two feminists who’ve written opinion columns for The New York Times are still giddy about Hillary Clinton’s chances in 2016. Benghazi, schmengazi.

Appearing Thursday at the liberal Center for American Progress, former Times columnist Anna Quindlen asserted any gender-related problems Hillary encountered in previous races have been “wiped out,” and her gender would only be an asset if she runs in 2016.



Erica Greider reviewed on Tuesday the recent conservative-bashing book by New York Times columnist and former editorial page editor Gail Collins, As Texas Goes – How the Lone Star State Hijacked the American Agenda. Greider covers the region for the Economist and knows something about Texas history, which puts Collins at a disadvantage. Greider wrote:

...Her book, 'As Texas Goes... ,' pays particular attention to the state’s staggering inequality, casual embrace of crony capitalism and creaky educational pipeline. These are problems for Texas, of course, but Ms. Collins’s concern is that Texas itself is everyone’s problem. “Personally, I prefer to think that all Americans are in the same boat,” she says. “And Texas has a lot to do with where we’re heading.”

Greider politely corrected some of Collins's factual errors: "....the problem with this book is one that has dogged other outsiders’ accounts: stereotypes about Texas are so strong that they may trump the record."