Journalist E. Jean Carroll is making sexual assault allegations against President Donald Trump, dating from the mid-1990s. Initially many journalistic outlets held off reporting her claims, which caused anger in left-wing social media circles. The New York Times editor-in-chief Dean Baquet has issued a groveling apology for not giving the thin allegations more intense play. The Times had a far different reaction in 1999, after Juanita Broaddrick came forward with her story of being raped by Bill Clinton. When it was Clinton being accused, the paper lamented the rush to judgement by other outlets. When it’s Trump, the paper’s editor lamented his own paper’s failure to rush to judgement.



The New York Times hosted one of its "Times Talks" on April 2, promising "a wide-ranging and candid discussion on press freedom in an age of alternative facts" with executive editor Dean Baquet and David E. McCraw, the paper’s top newsroom lawyer. The most embarrassing part was a discussion of why, oh why Donald Trump's rhetoric about the press "resonates" with people. McCraw touted Peter Arnett was a "great war correspondent."



For those who either didn’t watch Tuesday’s Tucker Carlson Tonight or want to relive it, The Federalist’s Sean Davis made a rare TV appearance and absolutely lambasted the liberal media for their years-long narrative that the President and his team colluded with Russians, calling this falsehood “probably the biggest, most consequential screw up of the last 25 to 50 years.”



During Saturday’s edition of The Axe Files With David Axelrod, host David Axelrod sat down with New York Times Executive Editor Dean Baquet and The Washington Post Executive Editor Marty Baron. The first portion of the interview focused primarily on President Trump and his relationship with the media.



After an extensive internal review, The New York Times announced on Tuesday that Ali Watkins would receive a “fresh start” and move from Washington, D.C., to “a new beat” in New York City even though the 26-year-old reporter had been romantically involved with at least two potential sources over a three-year period. Executive Editor Dean Baquet explained the decision by stating the Times “must be a humane place that can allow for second chances when there are mitigating circumstances.”



The aggressive, biased coverage of The New York Times against Donald Trump is so obvious that even the liberal journalists at CBS noticed it. On Tuesday, CBS This Morning hosts talked to Times Executive Editor Dean Baquet and Washington Bureau Chief Elisabeth Bumiller about their appearance in the new Showtime series The Fourth Estate.



The mainstream media’s contempt for “Trump’s favorite network” Fox News, and especially the morning show Fox & Friends, continues apace. A particularly virulent and condescending example is Charles Blow’s Monday column for the New York Times, “Horror of Being Governed by ‘Fox & Friends.’” Blow spewed: "America is being governed by the dimmest of wits on the most unscrupulous of networks. The very thought of it is horror-inducing."



CNN Reliable Sources host Brian Stelter interviewed New York Times executive editor Dean Baquet on Sunday. None of his questions or statements were the slightest bit challenging to Baquet or the Times. They sounded like an interview that Times public relations execs dream about. "Oh Dean, your paper is so true. And so profitable. And yet, they criticize you? Are they out of control?"



Late Wednesday afternoon, The New York Times decided that it would not fire Glenn Thrush following an investigation into allegations of sexual misconduct, citing “dozens of interviews with people both inside and outside the newsroom” and that Thrush will seek workplace “training” to supplement his “counseling and substance abuse rehabilitation.”



John Stossel of Fox News penned a column titled “I Hate The New York Times.” Stossel says he reads the Times because "my neighbors read it, and I need to understand what they think. Sadly, many think dumb things because most every day the Times runs deceitful, biased stories and headlines that mislead."



Last week, the first two videos released by James O'Keefe's Project Veritas exposed how a now apparently former New York Times employee colluded with the biggest players in social media and online video to favor its content over others. The videos drove a furious Dean Baquet, the paper's executive editor, to criticize that employee and O'Keefe using, of all things, religious terms — "venial" and "mortal" sins, respectively — rarely used outside of a Catholic Church, school, or home. How ironic, given that the Times routinely ridicules and marginalizes mainstream Judeo-Christian faiths and their followers.



White House correspondents Maggie Haberman and Peter Baker were joined in Washington, D.C., by executive editor Dean Baquet in a conversation on covering the Trump administration, moderated by media columnist Jim Rutenberg on October 12. About 33 minutes into the talk, the subject turned to liberal bias, and there were the usual evasions and denials. Baker played dumb by suggesting readers were getting the editorials confused with the news (while admitting there were more liberals than conservatives in the newsroom) while Haberman insisted that reporters played things "straight  down the middle."