On Tuesday, The Washington Post held a series of panel discussions and aired live video around the theme "Americans & The Media: Sorting Fact from Fake News." In one segment, Post political reporter Dan Balz talked to PBS NewsHour anchor Judy Woodruff and Fox Special Report host Bret Baier. Woodruff lamented "an entire industry" that is ripping the media that "holds democracy together." 



Maybe, as the meme says, Donald Trump really is "living rent-free in the heads of the media and liberals everywhere."

On Sunday's This Week show on ABC, show host Martha Raddatz read the presumptive GOP nominee's tweet wondering how the FBI could possibly not "recommend criminal charges against Hillary Clinton." Raddatz, while reading the full tweet, said, "against crooked Hillary Clinton." "Crooked" is Trump's favorite adjective to describe Mrs. Clinton, strangely not used in this instance, and which the press tries to avoid like the plague. Home video posted online from the show demonstrates that Raddatz indeed said "crooked." But the word "crooked" was deleted from an ABC affiliate's video retrieved Tuesday morning from Grabien.com, and is also no longer included in the official show video at ABC's web site.



During Tuesday's edition of NBC's Today morning program, news anchor Andrea Mitchell addressed a trend that probably has former secretary of state Hillary Clinton and her campaign staff feeling "trumped:" White women are “abandoning” the Democratic front-runner in the 2016 presidential campaign “in droves."

The host of Andrea Mitchell Reports -- which airs at 12 noon weekdays on the MSNBC cable channel -- started her report by stating: “Hillary Clinton is reaching out to that group that she'd always counted on: white women voters who are now abandoning her in droves during the last two months. “



Meet the Press moderator Chuck Todd seems to be obsessed with complaining about America’s political climate and decided to show his frustration by promoting an NBC-created animated skit asking “what if kids starting using political talking points, the talking points politicians use, to talk back to their parents?” In the skit, the child, named Billy, is accused by his mother of eating a dozen chocolate chip cookies, to which he predictably says “You know who's behind this, don't you? The Koch brothers.” 



 

Liberals love to complain that there’s far too much money in politics and on Sunday’s Meet the Press, the entire panel predictably fretted that political spending could spell the demise of American democracy. NBC’s Luke Russert introduced the segment by lamenting how “there's real concern about the role money is playing in our politics with some even going as far to argue our democracy is being bought and sold.” 



When a Washington Post-ABC News poll ends up finding the "Best News for Republicans," the Post tries to find other findings to highlight in their headlines.

"Majority of Americans find Obama presidency a failure" wasn't going to be bolded on the front page. They went with "Support widens for air strikes" instead. ABC News, their polling partner, never found it.



After introducing his political panel on the July 7 edition of MSNBC’s The Daily Rundown, host Chuck Todd chose to mock Brent Bozell, Media Research Center President and NewsBusters publisher, after realizing he had three titans of the mainstream media on his program at the same time.

Todd described the panel, consisting of The New York Times’ Carolyn Ryan, Dan Balz of The Washington Post, and Susan Page of USA Today as “really a nightmare scenario for Brent Bozell. This is like the mainstream media all in one place, the Times, the Post, USA Today, NBC. Oh my God! Heads are exploding!” [MP3 audio here; video below]



Appearing on Monday's The Daily Rundown on MSNBC, Washington Post reporter Dan Balz touted Democratic spin that the ongoing Benghazi scandal could actually help Hillary Clinton's 2016 presidential campaign: "I talked to somebody over the weekend, a Democrat, who said, you know, this could actually be good for Clinton because the degree to which the right is really after her helps her with her left....if she's under attack by the right, the Democrats across the spectrum will be more forgiving of her." [Listen to the audio or watch the video after the jump]

Host and NBC political director Chuck Todd led off the exchange by wondering if the House GOP was just "playing politics" with the issue by announcing a select committee to investigate the 2012 terrorist attack. Balz declared: "I mean, I think the base of the Republican Party is very stirred up and continues to be very stirred up over Benghazi." Todd whined: "And they believe the worst in this conspiracy about the White House. And they believe it to the core."



When President Bush gave his fifth State of the Union address on January 31, 2006, he sat at 43 percent approval in the Gallup tracking poll, in no small part because of public perception regarding his administration's handling of the aftermath of Hurricane Katrina. When President Obama delivered his fifth State of the Union last night, his Gallup approval number was lower a mere 41 percent, doubtless impacted in no small part by the disastrous rollout of ObamaCare and the public's disapproval of the health care overhaul.  What's more, some 53 percent in a recent Quinnipiac poll slammed the administration as incompetent and 47 percent expressed the belief that President Obama doesn't pay attention to what's transpiring on his watch. As to more objective metrics, the job situation is worse at this point in Barack Obama's presidency than it was the same point in George W. Bush's with higher unemployment (6.7 percent to Bush's 4.9 percent) and a woefully low labor force participation rate (62.8 percent to Bush's 66 percent).

Yet when you compare the Washington Post's front-page treatments of Mr. Obama's January 28 speech and Mr. Bush's January 31, 2006 one, it becomes all too apparent that the Post is eager to help the former spin his way to resetting the narrative for the midterm election year while the paper was all too happy to pound out a drumbeat about how President Bush was an abject failure, a lame duck roasting in the waters of public disapproval. Here's how Post staffers David Nakamura and David Fahrenthold opened up their January 29 front-pager "Obama: I won't stand still" (emphasis mine):



"Republican lawmakers Thursday blamed the Obama administration for the stunning resurgence of Iraq’s al-Qaeda franchise and called on the White House to take assertive steps to help Baghdad beat back militant uprisings in the country’s west." That's how Ernesto Londono opened his January 10 story "Republicans blame Obama administration for al-Qaeda resurgence in Iraq," a front-page-worthy story which Washington Post editors buried on page A10.

By contrast, the Post ran not one but two Chris Christie bridge-scandal stories on the Friday edition's front page. The other stories rounding out the front page centered on efforts to hash out a long-term security agreement with Afghanistan, the Washington Redskins announcing their new head coach, and privacy/data-collection concerns from dashboard computers in new cars.



The inauguration of unreconstructed liberal Bill de Blasio as New York’s newest mayor excited liberals hoping for a return to pre-Clinton times...and yet there were the Clintons, seeming to endorse the whole thing.

In Thursday’s Washington Post, columnist Melinda Henneberger wrote on page A-2 that the event was “not just a progressive jamboree but a 90-minute pummeling of outgoing mayor Michael Bloomberg, who looked glum in the front row of the VIP guests who faced the crowd.” The socialist flag was flying, and Harry Belafonte was on the set list:



Poor guy.

Barack Obama gets to jet around on Air Force One, golfs every once in a while (/sarc), and has all the trappings and perks of the highest office in the land. But according to a headline in Monday's Washington Post, he is the one person in the whole USA above everyone else — not those who have lost health insurance plans with which they were happy, not those who are paying outrageious amounts for far skimpier coverage than they formerly had, not the millions of potential workers so discouraged that they are no longer looking for work or considered to be workers, not the increasing ranks of the homeless — who has taken it on the chin this year (bolds are mine throughout this post):