On Sunday’s This Week, Cokie Roberts argued that Hillary Clinton will actively use her role has grandmother to sell herself to voters heading into the 2016 election. Roberts relayed how “she said, what voters care about is who will be there when they need them,” contending that “somewhat plays into the grandmother theme. Because, you know, your grandmother is there when you need her. And I think that’s a way of dealing with this age issue.”



During a panel discussion Sunday’s This Week with George Stephanopoulos, NPR's Cokie Roberts rushed to defend Hillary Clinton for continuing to not answer questions from the press in the month since she announced her presidential campaign. 



On Sunday’s This Week, several members of the show’s political panel took some cheap shots at the GOP and CNN contributor LZ Granderson argued that the 2016 GOP presidenttal contenders look like an “intolerant field.” The anti-GOP discussion started with political commentator Cokie Roberts proclaiming that the GOP may have 19 potential presidential candidates, but they “don’t appeal to diverse America.”



During an appearance on MSNBC’s Morning Joe on Wednesday, ABC News political commentator Cokie Roberts rushed to the defense of Hillary Clinton after the New York Times revealed that a congressional committee had asked Clinton about her use of a private e-mail account while at the State Department more than two years ago.



According to ABC's Cokie Roberts, hints that Hillary Clinton may be unlikable can be traced back to sexism. The veteran journalist appeared on Good Morning America, Tuesday, to promote her new book, but the conversation veered into a discussion of 2016. Citing an unnamed poll, Roberts referenced "research that shows that a woman who is strong and powerful is seen as not friendly and empathetic." 



This had to be one of the more telling moments about the emptiness of Hillary Clinton's campaign.  When Mika Brzezinski asked Morning Joe panel members today to describe Hillary's message "in ten seconds or less," they burst into laughter.  "Why is that funny?" demanded Mika, surely knowing the answer: that Hillary stands for nothing much more than "it's my turn, dammit!"

But that didn't stop Anne Gearan of the Washington Post from piping up, claiming "I can answer that.  It's 'I'm on your side and they're not."  As Newsbuster Ken Shepherd has detailed, Gearan has been "ready for Hillary" for a long time. But in fairness, perhaps Gearan is on to something.  Hillary really is on your side . . . assuming you've donated a minimum of a million bucks to the Clinton Foundation.



On Sunday, ABC’s This Week discussed the political fallout from the annual CPAC conference and the entire panel, excluding conservative radio talk show host Laura Ingraham, deemed the conservative gathering politically dangerous for any potential Republican presidential candidate. ABC’s Matthew Dowd claimed that CPAC was so far to the right “[w]hat would happen if Ronald Reagan, with that record, had shown up at this conference? He would have been booed.”  



This week, journalists — no doubt trying to be helpful — tell Republicans to bypass conservatives if they want to have any hope of winning, while others in the media seize on the measles outbreak to slam conservatives as having "a problem with science." Also: an NBC correspondent slams the late Iraq war hero Chris Kyle as a "racist" who went on "killing sprees," and actress Ashley Judd ludicrously claims Hillary Clinton would be "the most overqualified candidate we've had since, you know, Thomas Jefferson or George Washington."



The liberals at NPR weren't sugar-coating their view of  how conservative Republicans will lead their party into a "disastrous" end if they do well in Iowa. On Monday's Morning Edition, NPR analyst Cokie Roberts insisted Iowa Republicans seem to favor social conservatives who push the GOP too far to the right in a general election. They oppose gay marriage and "turn off young voters in droves" and oppose amnesty for immigrants, which has made Rep. Steve King's name "toxic" among Hispanics.



Over the weekend, Congressman Steve King (R-IA) hosted the Iowa Freedom Summit, which featured several potential Republican presidential candidates and on Sunday's ABC’s This Week with George Stephanopoulos, Cokie Roberts, correspondent for NPR, eagerly took a shot at the gathering of influential conservatives. Speaking during the show’s panel discussion, Roberts slammed the GOP event and insisted that “Republicans should stay out of Iowa altogether. What happens to them is that they get pushed so far to the right in those venues that it gives them a terrible time in the general election.”  



On December 11, the continuing resolution currently funding the federal government will expire and that seemed like the perfect opportunity for the folks at National Public Radio to speculate about a possible GOP-caused government shutdown. Appearing on NPR’s Morning Edition on Monday, December 1, Steve Inskeep and Cokie Roberts went to great lengths discussing how the Republican Party could shut down the federal government. Even though Roberts conceded that a shutdown was unlikely, the NPR correspondent did her best to repeatedly play up how the GOP wants to “to keep the option open all the time.” 



Between Sunday and Monday, all three broadcast networks devoted full reports to a Republican congressional staffer criticizing the Obama daughters on her personal Facebook page. On ABC's Good Morning America on Sunday, host Dan Harris proclaimed: "The online outrage over an attack on President Obama's daughters. A Republican congressional staffer posting a rant on Facebook about the way Sasha and Malia looked and acted at this moment here during the White House turkey pardoning the other day."