They’ve called him a racist, a cult leader, and a foreign agent, but now they’re going the full “Hitler.” After just recently digging up some “professionals” willing to claim that the Trump movement is aimed at taking down democracy, Salon writer Chauncey Devega found a history professor with even less professional self-respect.



“White people” are willing to use all means necessary to preserve their privilege, according to some liberals, and that includes destroying democracy. While interviewing professor Steven Miller and research scientist Nicholas Davis about their new book White Outgroup Intolerance and Declining Support for American Democracy, Salon writer Chauncey Devega discussed “racism and authoritarianism” in America.



Earlier this month, I wrote an op-ed for The Hill where I argued that Republicans should support President Trump and follow his electoral formula, or “die” — i.e., face extinction as a party.  The piece had an obvious target audience — establishment Republicans — with an obvious goal in mind — to get wishy-washy GOP elected officials on board with the President’s agenda.



In a Monday piece, Chauncey DeVega urged “people of conscience and true patriots” to fly their American flags upside down on Tuesday, the Fourth of July, “as a collective signal of our national distress” over Donald Trump’s presidency. “America’s citizens have been traumatized,” declared DeVega, who argued that upside-down flags “would symbolize that Americans, as individuals and as a people, are much better than Donald Trump and what he represents.”



An April 6 piece published on the uber-liberal Salon.com by Chauncey DeVega featured a podcast interview with Philip Zimbardo, the psychologist responsible for the renowned “Stanford Prison Experiment.” Not surprisingly, both men trashed both President Trump and his supporters in the podcast. 

 



The right’s widely varied response to Donald Trump’s presidential bid may be the political story of the year so far, but many liberals have ignored it in favor of arguing that Trump’s worldview is a pure product of conservatism. For example, in a Sunday article, Chauncey DeVega claimed that Trump is “the logical result of at least five decades of Republican political strategy” and defined Trumpmania as “a mass political temper tantrum on the Right caused by a potent mix of authoritarianism and racism.”

“Much of the rhetoric, policies, and goals of the Republican Party and Donald Trump in 2016 are disturbingly similar to those of…the Ku Klux Klan,” declared DeVega. “This should be no surprise. The Republican Party is the United States’ largest de facto white identity organization. Conservatism and racism is now one and the same thing in the American post civil rights era.”



White nationalist and anti-Semite David Duke recently urged listeners to his radio show to vote for Donald Trump and to volunteer for Trump’s campaign. For Republicans, that’s pretty much business as usual, argued Chauncey DeVega in a Sunday article for Daily Kos.

“In the post-civil rights era conservatism and racism are one and the same thing. Because of that dynamic, the Republican Party is the United States’ largest white identity organization,” DeVega claimed. “Donald Trump is the hell spawn of decades of Republican racism and white supremacy. They can try to deny their bastard child…but the world will still know his parentage.”



As of 11 p.m. ET on Friday, according to CNN, the death toll was "at least 153" (since updated to "at least 128") who have been "killed in gunfire and blasts" in Paris in "coordinated attacks." CNN claims that "It is still not clear who is responsible." (Update: Early Saturday morning Eastern Time, ISIS claimed responsibility.)

Two days ago, leftist Democrat Hillary Clinton laughed at the idea of Republican presidential candidate Carly Fiorina being strangled. Today, we've learned that wealthy "liberal funders" are considering bankrolling the Black Lives Matter movement, whose followers have frequently been seen and heard targeting police with language like, "Pigs in a blanket, fry 'em like bacon" and "What do we want? Dead cops!" But Salon's Chauncey DeVega wants everyone to know that, after Paris, it's the right in the U.S. which needs "to tone down their incessant violent rhetoric."



It’s a tall order for a black politician to become popular with “the de facto largest white identity organization in the United States,” but DeVega argues that Carson has pulled it off by “betray[ing] the Black Freedom Struggle and assault[ing] the truth in all its forms.” (As you probably assumed, “white identity organization” is DeVega’s description of the Republican party.)

In a Salon article, DeVega attacked Carson for his recent remarks likening abortion to slavery: “Ben Carson and the other conservatives who want to limit women’s reproductive rights and control over their own bodies have more in common with the whites who ran the slave labor rape and charnel camps of the American South than they do with Abolitionists such as John Brown, Harriet Tubman, Frederick Douglass, David Walker, Sojourner Truth, or William Lloyd Garrison.” (Italics in original.)



A common allegation against Ronald Reagan during his White House years was that he confused movies with the real world. According to Chauncey DeVega, the current Republican presidential candidates do somewhat the same thing, and have added video games and a bit of Comic-Con to the mix.

“Wednesday night’s CNN debate showed the American people an alternate reality where Chuck Norris movies are the Bible for statecraft,” sniped DeVega in a Friday article. “Adult children who dress up and give speeches as they role-play being President of the United States are competing in a real life Republican cosplay competition to be one of the most powerful people on Earth.” DeVega also declared that the debate was so hysterical that it amounted to a “master class in lies. Joseph Goebbels would be proud.”



Although the term “anchor baby” has been around for only a couple of decades, the concept is several centuries old, believes Chauncey DeVega. In a Friday article, DeVega contended that the earliest American anchor babies were born to colonists, and that the modern term “cannot possibly be separated from the nightmare of white supremacy, of a democracy where human rights and citizenship were based on a person’s melanin count and parentage.”

DeVega further argued that a much broader racial agenda is at work: “Movement conservatives’ eager deployment of the ‘anchor baby’ meme — and their solution of revoking birthright citizenship through a rewrite of the Constitution– is in keeping with the Republican Party’s assault on the won-in-blood freedom of black and brown Americans. The ‘anchor baby’ talking point is yet more proof that the GOP is a radical and destructive political force, one that actively embraces white supremacy.”



Amid mounting evidence of Bill Cosby’s depraved behavior, many have changed their minds about Cosby the person. Should they also reconsider, for very different reasons, their affection for his megahit sitcom, The Cosby Show? Lefty writer Chauncey DeVega thinks so. In a Sunday article for Salon, DeVega opined that the series “lied to its white viewers about the nature of racism, white supremacy, and white privilege” and “enable[d] the colorblind white racist fiction and delusion that anti-black racism is a thing of the past.”

The Huxtables, claimed DeVega, were “an African-American version of the model-minority myth, one of the favorite deflections and rejoinders of white racists in the post-civil rights era, where there are ‘exceptional’ minorities and the rest are failures because they do not work hard, are lazy, and complain too much about white racism. While unintentional, ‘The Cosby Show’ enabled some of the ugliest Reagan-era fantasies.”