For the latest print issue of National Review dated February 11, editor Charles C.W. Cooke offered one of the best eviscerations ever of the liberal media for their odious behavior, declaring them to be “[v]ain, languid, excitable, morbid, duplicitous, cheap, insular, mawkish, and possessed of a chronic self-obsession that would have made Dorian Gray blush” led by people like CNN’s Jim Acosta acting like “a member of the cast of Hamilton.”



During her nine-year tenure as a blogger for the Washington Post, Jennifer Rubin has written columns that have been described by the newspaper as coming “from a conservative perspective.” More than three dozen conservative leaders disagreed with that assessment on Wednesday, when they sent a letter to the Post’s editorial board stating that Rubin has “repeatedly rejected conservative ideas and principles” and is an example of why the American people are unable to trust the media.



The legion of the perpetually aggrieved "white supremacy"-obsessed jumped on a Monday remark by Trump administration Attorney General Jeff Sessions to concoct a bogus "racial dogwhistle" when he used the term "Anglo-American heritage of law enforcement" in a speech to the National Sheriffs' Association. Five days in, many of them still haven't acknowledged that former President Barack Obama and others in his administration have used the term without generating controversy.



After longtime conservative author, columnist, and think tank scholar Charles Murray was chased on Thursday from far-left Middlebury College by an angry mob, the Associated Press felt more than comfortable smearing Murray as a supposed “white nationalist.”

 



Donald Trump is a visceral and emotional conservative, not a philosophical conservative, but that’s good enough for government work, suggests New York blogger Chait. The main aim of Chait’s Thursday post was to slap down the argument from some righty pundits that candidate Trump was, as Chait paraphrased it, “a non-ideological figure, or even a progressive…who chose the Republican Party for no particular reason, and who shares none of its salient characteristics.” Chait indicated that in general, conservatives’ distaste for the president-elect is found among journalists and intellectuals, while “activists” have worldviews similar to Trump’s.



On Monday on Twitter, National Review writer Charles C. W. Cooke called out the hypocrisy of the New York Times, as he posted a contrast, a Times flip-flop: a 2014 Editorial Board write-up on how the “Terror Watch Lists Run Amok” and a 2015 Editorial Board write-up on why Republicans are showing “Tough Talk and a Cowardly Vote on Terrorism” by refusing to let the terror watch lists run amok.



Poor Gary Legum at Salon.com. How dare supporters of the right to keep and bear arms as clearly defined in the Constitution's Second Amendment push back against the gun control movement's cynical exploitation of Thursday's Roseburg, Oregon massacre?

Legum is outraged that "The right tells us (again) to ignore the elephant in the room." He must mean the fact that the area in question at Umpqua Community College was a "posted" gun-free zone with only unarmed security guards, right? Of course not. Legum is upset over Americans' "irrational attachment ... to weaponry" — so upset that he descended into profanity and name-calling that would likely end his career forever if he were a right-wing commentator.



On Friday's Morning JoeNational Review writer Charles Cooke shook up the roundtable discussing the shooting at Umpqua Community College in Oregon. Joe Scarborough talked about new gun laws likely wouldn’t have stopped the massacre. Cooke articulated that no one knew how to address the problem of gun control because of the millions of guns on the street. The panel seeking to correct Cooke went after his statements, first with Mark Halperin on a complaint of the overuse of complicated, then Mika Brzezinski on Cooke's perceived hostility to reform, and finally Howard Dean on his ideas to fix the problem.



On Thursday, the CBS Evening News seized on the deadly shooting of two local news reporters in Roanoke, Virginia to promote the idea that gun control should be treated like “a public health issue” akin to seat belts, airbags, and anti-smoking campaigns. In a tease early on in the program, fill-in anchor Maurice DuBois explained that “[s]ome public health officials say gun violence, just like car accidents and smoking-related illnesses can be prevented or at least reduced.”



It's comforting to know that some things don't change. Even though the news is dominated by the explosive situation in Syria and the tumult over the provisions of ObamaCare, Cable News Network's Piers Morgan still found time on Thursday to devote to his favorite subject: gun control.

“I'd like to suggest a new amendment to the Constitution: the right NOT to be shot/killed by a gun,” the CNN weeknight talk show host posted on Twitter. It wasn't long before he was the subject of tweets declaring him “the dumbest man alive” and noting that “murder is illegal already. Thanks for your input.”



As conservatives, we know what happens every time we criticize the policies of the liberal occupant of the White House: We're instantly branded as “racist” and “intolerant” while our views are quickly and summarily dismissed.

However, Kevin Drum, a political blogger for the liberal Mother Jones website, has received similar treatment as he learned that no matter which side of an issue he supports, his mailbox on the Twitter social media website quickly fills up with emails from people taking the opposite view.