On October 12, the movie Gosnell: The Trial of America’s Biggest Serial Killer debuted in 673 theaters on October 12, and grossed $1.2 million in its first weekend.  But The Washington Post offered no review for its debut, although it was showing in eight Virginia theaters and six in Maryland. The New York Times offered reviews of 15 new movies that day, but not the pro-life one. The only major paper that reviewed it, the Los Angeles Times, lamented it had "a sanctimonious tone that’s anything but subtle.”



Dana Loesch at TheBlaze TV interviewed Irish filmmaker Ann McElhinney, who’s working on a movie and a book about abortionist Curtis Gosnell, now in prison for killing babies after birth in his dirty Philadelphia clinic.  She met Dr. Gosnell in person.

“He has an answer for everything. He lives in his own little world. Every word that comes out of his mouth is a lie. He lies so easily,” she said.



Explosions and fires are a common feature of today’s fictional movies as heroes dodge bullets and conflagrations in pursuit of justice. That might explain why opponents of hydraulic fracturing (or fracking) have decided to dramatize their case against scientific progress by lighting water on fire and then falsely blaming fracking for the blaze.

Thanks to a new film called FrackNation (watch it tonight at 9 pm ET on the AXS cable channel), Americans who have been subjected to such shady journalism will finally get a chance to see the full picture.



With hydraulic fracking looking more and more like the future of American energy independence, the Left are predictably bringing out the big guns to stop it.

Doing his part is actor Matt Damon who has co-written and will star in next year's "Promised Land."

An email message from documentarians Ann McElhinney and Phelim McAleer published by Common American Journal Wednesday offered specifics:



E-mail messages obtained by NewsBusters refute claims that multi-millionaire filmmaker James Cameron cancelled a debate with prominent global warming skeptics because they weren't as famous as he is.

As NewsBusters reported Monday, a debate had been scheduled and placed on the program for last weekend's AREDay summit in Aspen, Colorado, featuring internet publisher Andrew Breitbart, Sen. James Inhofe's (R-Okla.) former communications director Marc Morano, and documentarian Ann McElhinney. 

Within the past 36 hours, event organizers have absurdly claimed that since Cameron wanted to match wits with either Glenn Beck, Sarah Palin, or Inhofe, he decided to pull out of the debate when this didn't happen.

E-mail messages between the prospective participants and Cameron's representative paint an entirely different picture. 

To begin our story, Richard Greene, the man that negotiated the particulars with the skeptics, sent the following regrets to the prospective participants some time Saturday (h/t Big Hollywood):



Multi-millionaire filmmaker James Cameron on Sunday backed out of a global warming debate that he asked for and organized.

For those that haven't been following the recent goings on concerning Nobel Laureate Al Gore's favorite money-making myth, an environmental summit was held this weekend in Aspen, Colorado, called AREDAY, which is short for American Renewable Energy Day.

Ahead of this conference, Cameron challenged three noted global warming skeptics to a public debate where he was going to personally "call those deniers out into the street at high noon and shoot it out with those boneheads."

One of the invited skeptics, Ann McElhinney of NotEvilJustWrong.com, wrote about Cameron's surprise cancellation Sunday:



Could Western environmentalists hinder the economic development of the newly independent nation of Kosovo? They could, if the media trend of siding with environmentalists continues.