The October 1-14 issue of New York Magazine issued 10 pages of anti-Kavanaugh bile under the heading “Her and Him -- The hearing that broke America.” It’s a collection of brief essays on the September 27 Senate Judiciary committee testimony of Christine Blasey Ford and Brett Kavanaugh: Ten pages of inchoate liberal rage, from liberals including Jonathan Chait, Frank Rich, Rebecca Traister (preserved in amber at the moment after the testimony and before Kavanaugh’s confirmation vote), all shamelessly junking any pretense of due process while loudly assuming Kavanaugh’s guilt.



President Trump couldn’t complete his second day of tweeting in 2018 without shots at the liberal media. With a tweet early Tuesday night, he hyped the fake news awards he planned to give out at the start of next week. And it caused the liberal media to have a mental breakdown, as demonstrated by CNN’s Brian Stelter, who predicted nothing but “madness” for 2018 during his appearance on Anderson Cooper 360 shortly after the tweet was put out.



New York magazine contributor Andrew Sullivan has a well deserved reputation as being an unhinged liberal anti-Trumper. However, unlike most leftists, Sullivan does experience brief moments of mental clarity. Such a moment occurred today when Sullivan experienced extreme foreboding about the outcome of next weeks gubernatorial election in Virginia. He fears that the Democrat stance on immigration has a good chance of leading to the defeat of Ralph Northam in How the Democrats Are Failing the Resistance:



Radical black author Ta-Nehisi Coates, who regularly calls President Trump a white supremacist and has displayed a callous attitude toward 9-11 first responders, was rewarded with prominent placement on the front of Saturday’s New York Times arts page in a laudatory interview with Books section staff writer Concepcion De Leon: “An Intellectual’s Journey.” The subhead gave no hint of any controversy around Coates: “With a new book on the Obama presidency and its aftermath, Ta-Nehisi Coates learns to accept the fame he never sought.”



In the spring of 2011, Newt Gingrich denounced Paul Ryan’s then-current proposed federal budget as “right-wing social engineering” and argued that a “free society” should not “impos[e] radical change.” On Friday, Andrew Sullivan made a similar case against congressional Republicans’ attempts to junk ObamaCare



“Between Donald Trump and anything resembling Christianity,” there is only a great void -- a “vast, empty, and dark space,” declared gay Catholic pundit Sullivan in a Friday column for New York magazine. Sullivan described Trump as “neither religious nor irreligious. He is pre-religious. He is a pagan. He makes much more sense as a character in Game of Thrones, a medieval world bereft of the legacy of Jesus of Nazareth, than as a president of a modern, Western country...I will never understand how more than half of white Catholics could vote for such a man, or how the leadership of the church could be so terribly silent when such a monster stalks the earth.”



On Tuesday's Tavis Smiley show on PBS, as New York magazine's Andrew Sullivan appeared as a guest to discuss current political events, host Smiley at one point fretted that -- because Republicans denied President Barack Obama the chance to appoint Judge Merrick Garland to the Supreme Court -- they were "trampling" on the Constitution, and oddly asked if they might ignore other parts of the Constitution like the abolition of slavery or the right for women to vote. Suggesting that Republicans violated the Constitution in blocking Judge Garland, Smiley whined: "It was, to be sure, a violation of democratic norms, but it was more than that. To me, it was a trampling on the Constitution by the Republican party who did not give Mr. Garland a hearing. ... He was obligated to put forth that nomination, and they were obligated to take it up, I believe, and vote up or down. So it wasn't just a violation or an abrogation of norms, it was a trampling on one of our most precious documents."



Don't hold your breath waiting for MSNBC's Rachel Maddow to trumpet her next scoop, assuming the next time it's actually hers and not someone else's. In the wake of Maddow's is that all there is? report about Donald Trump's 2005 tax return that revealed the not at all shocking news that Trump was actually quite wealthy, at least as of a decade ago, and also paid tens of millions in federal income taxes, the backlash from both sides of the divide has been furious.



Claws came out Wednesday night on MSNBC’s Hardball as host Chris Matthews aired a half-hour long special dedicated to digging into the absurdity of BuzzFeed News publishing “salacious fake news” regarding President-elect Donald Trump. Matthews, who is known for his own outrageous statements, seemed incredibly disturbed by the whole situation. He at one point declared, “It’s certainly not journalism. I'm not sure what it is.” 



The New York Times post-convention political roundup praised Democratic stage-craft, Hillary Clinton’s acceptance speech, and forwarded complaints about bias at Fox News (but not CNN). Adam Nagourney’s “Stark Contrasts in Style and Substance” praised Democratic convention stagecraft and says that as a speaker who can “move a crowd, seize a moment...Barack Obama laps the field.”



On Monday's Anderson Cooper 360 on CNN, after New York magazine's Andrew Sullivan slammed Donald Trump's proposal for a temporary ban on Muslim immigrants, host Anderson Cooper grasped at straws to suggest an equivalence with banning Jews because "Jewish extremists" have "committed acts of terrorism against Israeli leaders" as he pushed back against conservative CNN commentator Kayleigh McEnany's support for Trump's plan.



Newt Gingrich hasn’t been an elected official in more than fifteen years, but according to Mother Jones blogger Kevin Drum, Gingrich’s vitriolic approach to politics during his years in the House of Representatives remains influential via Fox News. (Even though Gingrich stars on CNN.)

Piggybacking on an Andrew Sullivan blog post in which Sullivan alleged that watching Fox News was “like slipping into an alternative universe” where “hysteria is the constant norm,” Drum wrote on Thursday that Gingrich “brought conservative politics to a truly new, truly unprecedented level of toxic rancor,” and that Fox News is now “the ongoing, institutional expression of Gingrichism.”