Media outlets been hyping the recent increase in retail gas prices to nearly $3 per gallon, and primarily pinning the blame on President Trump's withdrawal from the Iran nuclear "deal." In 2012, when the price approached $4, CNN told readers that they "aren't as bad as you think," and that they weren't "a big drag on the economy" — and besides, according to the New York Times, "Gas prices are out of any president’s control."



Wednesday, CNN presented yet another story about Venezuela's implosion which did a fine job of portraying that country's human misery, this time in the oil industry. Unfortunately, it was yet another example of a story failing to mention its socialist form of government or even its leader, President Nicolas Maduro. Though such omissions have long been routine in establishment press reports, reporter Stefano Pozzebon's were particularly galling, given that the governments of Maduro and especially Hugo Chavez, his Bolivarian socialist predecessor, are entirely responsible for Venezuela's oil collapse.



As Venezuela's socialism-driven disaster deepens, the press's unwillingness to recognize its cause has gone from being "merely" negligent and outrageous to absolutely disgusting. This obvious failure, which is almost certainly conscious and deliberate, is present even when a journalist's work portraying the human element of the crisis is otherwise compelling. Such is the case with Ernesto Londoño's Saturday report at the New York Times about how refugees fleeing that country are overwhelming the ability of towns in northern Brazil to handle them.



The New York Times’ abject refusal to pin the socialism label on the failed and starving state of Venezuela is well-documented (as is the paper’s whitewashing of that and other tyrannical left-wing regimes). In the newest Times Sunday Magazine, writer Wil S. Hylton devoted nearly 9,000 words to fiery, often-imprisoned opposition leader Leopoldo Lopez, “Can Venezuela Be Saved?” yet managed to totally avoid the word “socialism,” the idea that formed the root of the country’s present failures.

 



As Venezuela plunges deeper into humanitarian crisis, the broadcast and cable networks barely recognize its existence, while the print press, which during relatively tolerable times routinely celebrated the country's socialist government, is more reluctant than ever to use the S-word. Of six articles I found Friday afternoon about the horrid, deteriorating situation in that country, only one used the word — and that was only because it was about snap elections de facto dictator Nicolas Maduro has called for April.



On Thursday’s Morning Joe, New York Times columnist Bret Stephens was brought on to promote his December 29 column explaining why he still considers himself to be an adherent of the “Never Trump” movement. In spite of expressing his agreement with many of the Trump administration’s actual policy positions, Stephens argued that Trump’s poor personal character and harsh criticism of the liberal media and FBI/DOJ leadership is “systematically corroding, corrupting, and [...] destroying our culture of governance” and thus negates any of his key political achievements.



Any list of the year's most ignored news stories has to include Venezuela's frightening deterioration. This once reasonably prosperous South American nation is now in the grips of a brutal socialist de facto dictatorship which is moving inexorably to consolidate its control, accompanied by an utterly wrecked economy. Families cannot feed their children, and many are dying. The New York Times broke through the near-blackout on Sunday, but failed to mention the root cause of the nation's humanitarian catastrophe — socialism — until the third-last of over 100 paragraphs.



The New York Times on Monday marked the 50th anniversary of the death of Fidel Castro henchman and murderous Communist thug Che Guevara. The paper’s Andes bureau chief Nicholas Casey filed “Execution Haunts Village 50 Years After Guevara’s Death.” The left has long been infatuated with the Communist killer, and will read nothing to change their minds in the Times' blandishment remembrance from Bolivia, marking Guevara’s execution.



With the President’s new travel ban taking effect in October, the communist rulers of Venezuela spoke of on Monday by calling it “a form of psychological and political terrorism.” And in a CNN.com article published that same day, reporter Catherine Shoichet sympathized with the regime and parroted their slams of the U.S. But what went unmentioned, was CNN’s previous reporting which documented how members of Venezuela’s Foreign Ministry were possibly selling their passports and visas to terrorists.



The liberal media went above and beyond to denigrate President Donald Trump’s Sept. 19, speech to the United Nations General Assembly. One Newsweek headline proclaimed, “Trump Was Laughed At By World Leaders For Dissing Socialism.”



On Tuesday, Joshua Goodman of the Associated Press trumpeted that the economic "misery is likely to get even worse" in Venezuela due to new sanctions implemented by the Trump administration. Goodman acknowledged that the South American country is becoming "increasingly authoritarian," but didn't once describe the regime of President Nicolas Maduro as left-wing. He also cited an expert who asserted that possible additional sanctions might "throw Venezuela back to the stone ages."



As socialist Venezuela implodes, the media has been strangely silent on the matter. But, the lack of coverage isn't so strange considering the media's love for Venezuela's former socialist dictator Hugo Chavez and his leftist ideology. As Ben Shapiro at The Daily Wire points out, the media swooned over Chavez.