In conversations with most college officials, many CEOs, many politicians and race hustlers, it's not long before the magical words “diversity” and “inclusiveness” drop from their lips. Racial minorities are the intended targets of this sociological largesse, but women are included, as well. This obsession with diversity and inclusion is in the process of leading the nation to decline in a number of areas. We're told how it's doing so in science, in an article by Heather Mac Donald, a senior fellow at the Manhattan Institute, titled “How Identity Politics Is Harming the Sciences.”



There are now more job openings in America than Americans looking for jobs.

The Wall Street Journal reported on June 5, that in spring 2018, the U.S. economy reached this unique milestone — the first time since the Labor Department began tracking the statistic in 2000.



On Monday, columnist James Freeman at the Wall Street Journal's "Best of the Web" noted the selective memories seen in the vast majority of the press over President Donald Trump's relatively noncommittal but nonetheless protocol-breaking tweet an hour before Friday morning's upcoming jobs report. Many of them had a serious case of the vapors, but didn't recall three instances when former President Barack Obama did the same thing during his presidency, with as much or more specificity.



Tuesday marked the second edition of Chris Cuomo’s new show, Cuomo Prime Time. It’s quickly becoming clear that the show will just be another platform for liberal anger on CNN. Anthony Scaramucci, former White House Press Secretary, joined Cuomo for a discussion about Donald Trump rescinding the invitation of the Super Bowl champion Philadelphia Eagles to visit the White House. Scaramucci took the opportunity to call out Cuomo for not highlighting President Trump’s recent and meaningful victories.



The “booming jobs market” got very different treatment from each of the three broadcast networks as unemployment dropped to 3.8 percent.

While ABC, CBS and NBC evening news shows all reported the “stronger than expected” numbers, NBC Nightly News spent more than four times as long complaining about a tweet from President Trump ahead of the jobs numbers and fears of a trade war that “threaten” American jobs on June 1. CBS Evening News shortchanged the economy, spending only 17 seconds on the latest employment data.



In his coverage of Friday morning's stellar jobs report, the Associated Press's Chris Rugaber came up with a couple of doozies aimed at curbing readers' enthusiasm. The AP economics writer half-expected that employers would rein in their hiring over confrontational rhetoric President Donald Trump and other foreign leaders have recently engaged in over trade and tariffs. He also implausibly framed the record-low black unemployment rate of 5.9 percent merely as evidence that employers are just now finally "taking chances" with potential workers "they had previously ignored."



Several recent polls, plus the popularity of Sen. Bernie Sanders, demonstrate that young people prefer socialism to free market capitalism. That, I believe, is a result of their ignorance and indoctrination during their school years, from kindergarten through college. For the most part, neither they nor many of their teachers and professors know what free market capitalism is.



The media are treating the economy like a good-news/bad-news story. The good news is the economy is going well and unemployment is down to just 3.9 percent — the best since 2000. The bad news is ABC, CBS and NBC evening news programs don’t want to talk about it. ABC's World News Tonight, CBS Evening News and NBC Nightly News continued to supply minimal reporting of economic issues between April 1, and May 5, 2018. Out of 105 news programs (35 nights and a show on each of the three networks) there were just 18 stories about the U.S. economy — or in less than one-fifth of the broadcasts, according to a Nexis search.

 


The force might have been with ABC on May 4, but interest in the U.S. labor market certainly wasn’t. That night World News Tonight with David Muir spent a meager 15 seconds announcing the April jobs report which showed the lowest unemployment rate since 2000. That 3.9 percent was what other journalists called a “wow number” that could even help re-elect President Donald Trump.



You had to figure that a left-leaning journalist somewhere would denigrate Friday's news that the nation's seasonally adjusted unemployment rate fell below 4 percent for the first time since 2000. Jordan Weissmann, in a Slate.com column beginning with a headlined contention that "The Unemployment Rate Is Meaningless," came through.



The unemployment rate dropped below 4 percent for the first time since 2000, prompting analysts to call it a “wow” number. It also provoked a surprising election analysis from MSNBC Morning Joe contributor Donny Deutsch on May 4.



Robert Johnson, the founder of BET television and America’s first black billionaire, had some positive things to say about the economy in April, but most liberal media failed to notice. The one national paper to cover it delayed including it in the print edition for more than a week. Citing multiple factors including “fairly stable” interest rates, the “Trump tax cut,” and historically low unemployment for African Americans, Johnson said, “Business is very good.”