Forget the good economy. That’s what one network did as ABC World News Tonight chose to ignore the news of 157,000 jobs added and 3.9 percent unemployment on Aug. 3. The broadcast networks took three very different approaches to covering the July jobs report.



The Trump administration’s winning record on Hispanic unemployment finally received a long overdue nod of recognition from top national Spanish-language media outlets Univision and CNN en Español. As unemployment among the nation’s largest minority group fell for the second consecutive, record-setting month, both Univision and CNN en Español trumpeted the news in their principal national evening news programs.



Sarah Eisen, co-host of CNBC's Squawk on the Street tried to spin negativity in a hugely positive July jobs report. Despite her lame attempt, it largely failed due to the overwhelming positive numbers of the report which revealed an unemployment rate of only 3.9%.



New York Daily News’ parent company Tronc announced it would cut the tabloids newsroom staff in half on July 23. DeadSpin viewed the act as class warfare.

Tronc attributed the cuts to “realities of our business and the need to adapt to an ever-changing media environment,” according to CBSNews.com. A $15 million payout to CEO Michael Ferro (bundling the three-year obligations into a single payment) ahead of sexual harassment claims against him surfaced in March, put Tronc $14.8 million in the red in the first quarter.



Un minúsculo grupo de manifestantes que abogan por la abolición de ICE recibió tratamiento mayúsculo en Telemundo, la misma cadena que pasó por desapercibidos a los 164,000 hispanos que acaban de ingresar a la fuerza laboral del país, así como el nivel de desempleo hispano más bajo en la historia.



[Vean actualización al final] En la mañana del 6 de julio, el Departamento de Trabajo de los Estados Unidos anunció que el desempleo hispano en el país había alcanzado el nivel más bajo (4.6%) registrado en los 45 años que la agencia lleva contabilizando la estadística, desde 1973.



More Americans are quitting their jobs and even some media are admitting “that’s a good thing.”

The rising rate of American workers quitting their jobs voluntarily shows their confidence in the economy, especially the labor market. The quits rate is the highest its been since 2001. Many news outlets reported the good economic news, but not ABC and NBC news programming according to a Nexis search from July 4-15. (During that time other media were focused on the numbers and the May data was released).



A rag-tag bunch of 10 protesters calling for the abolition of ICE received feature-coverage treatment on Telemundo, the same network which did not consider the 164,000 Hispanics entering the labor force in June and record-low Hispanic unemployment sufficiently newsworthy to even be mentioned.



The Canadian government, lining the pockets of its dairy producers, imposes high tariffs on American dairy imports. That forces Canadians to pay higher prices for dairy products. For example, Canadians pay $5.24 for a 10.5-ounce block of cheddar. In Washington, D.C., that same amount of cheddar sells for $3.64. Canadians pay $3.99 for a 1-pound container of yogurt. In Washington, D.C., you can get nearly twice as much yogurt for a little over $4. It's clear that the Canadian government's tariffs screw its citizens by forcing them to pay higher prices for dairy products.



The June jobs report was more good news for American job seekers. The Bureau of Labor Statistics announced July 6, that 213,000 new jobs were added in June.

That was more than economists expected. The prior two months were also revised up, adding another 37,000 jobs.



On the morning of July 6, the U.S. Department of Labor’s Bureau of Labor Statistics announced that Hispanic unemployment in the United States had reached its lowest level, 4.6%, in the 45 years since the agency first started keeping records on the statistic, back in 1973. One would think such a historic achievement would be news that night on the nation’s leading Spanish-language television news programs, but that was not the case.



The government's Friday June jobs report showed that the economy gained 213,000 seasonally adjusted payroll jobs, while the nation's unemployment rate increased from 3.8 percent to 4.0 percent, primarily because 601,000 more Americans were in the labor force. Despite the increase in overall joblessness, the rate among Hispanics fell to 4.6 percent, its lowest level in the over 45 years of that statistic's history. Unlike in recent months, during which print and online establishment press outlets have mostly recognized record lows seen in black/African-American unemployment, the press has been very quiet about June's record Hispanic low. This has been particularly true at most of its perceived gatekeepers.