Now that Mueller and the dossier are ancient (buried) news, the liberal Spanish-speaking media will jump at any chance (asides from its non-stop illegal immigration litany) to declare doomsday for President Trump and his Administration. Case in point: the possibility, according to Univision, CNN en Español and Estrella TV, of an economic recession that could put an end to Trump’s claim to credit for the current economic boom. 



Here's what President Donald Trump tweeted about Baltimore's congressman and his city: “Rep. Elijah Cummings has been a brutal bully, shouting and screaming at the great men & women of Border Patrol about conditions at the Southern Border, when actually his Baltimore district is far worse and more dangerous. His district is considered the worst in the USA.”



Near the end of its evening newscast Telemundo, NBC’s Spanish-language affiliate network, recently had the temerity to treat its viewership to two and a half minutes of good news. Three cheers for a buoyant economy in which Latinos make up 63% of new homeowners in the United States.



White House Director of the National Economic Council Larry Kudlow called himself a “happy camper” about the state of the U.S. economy and criticized those making it sound like the country is in recession. “I do want to say and repeat that the U.S. economy is very strong and that’s what the jobs report [shows], and wages are rising,” he told anchor Stuart Varney on Fox Business’ Varney & Company July 15. Kudlow criticized those trying to gloss over the good economic news.



The left love to complain that recent economic growth has only benefited people at the very top and left the middle class and the poor behind. The Wall Street Journal just found more evidence to the contrary. “The fortunes of low-skilled workers have turned up markedly” amid the longest economic expansion in U.S. history and a near-record low in unemployment, Journal chief economics commentator Greg Ip wrote on July 10.



The liberal media don’t want to give President Donald Trump positive coverage on anything, including the economy. The New York Times’ reluctance was obvious as it downplayed the June jobs report which smashed expectations with 224,000 jobs. The Times quickly tamped down any economic enthusiasm.



CBS News online provided Democrats ammunition disguised as free advice and “facts” just ahead of their first debate. Supposedly wondering how the economy is “really doing,” CBS journalists Aimee Picchi, Alain Sherter, and Irina Ivanova glumly answered, “The first quarter of 2019 may be as good as it gets for quite a while.” 



The current economic expansion could “make history” if it lasts through July, but Bloomberg BusinessWeek pooh-poohed its 10th anniversary saying “no one’s partying” in the June 10 issue.



Outstanding economic news continues for the nation's largest ethnic minority – Hispanic Americans - with the unemployment rate for this segment of the population remaining at a record-low of 4.2% in May. Yet for the Spanish-language sister network of NBC, Telemundo, this historically low rate was not even worth mentioning on its national evening news.



In spite of the disappointing May jobs report showing only 75,000 new jobs, MarketWatch and CNBC reported signs of continued strength in the labor market that could help ease economic jitters. MarketWatch reporter Jeffry Bartash asked, “Has the U.S. labor market really taken a big turn for the worse?” and answered, “A new pair of employment reports suggest the answer is no.” He cited a private study of employment that indicated “a steady if more subdued pace of hiring during the summer” and “near-record high” job openings (7.4 million) in April, which was coupled with an “extremely low” number of layoffs.



Even liberal newsrooms have to grapple with economic realities, as Vox Media may be learning.



Last week's column discussed Dr. Thomas Sowell's newest book Discrimination and Disparities, which is an enlarged and revised edition of an earlier version. In this review, I am going to focus on one of his richest chapters titled “Social Visions and Human Consequences.” Sowell challenges the seemingly invincible fallacy “that group outcomes in human endeavors would tend to be equal, or at least comparable or random, if there were no biased interventions, on the one hand, nor genetic deficiencies, on the other.” But disparate impact statistics carries the day among academicians, lawyers and courts as evidence of discrimination.