New York Times reporter Jeremy Peters marked 10 years since the launch of the Tea Party movement, which spread with huge yet peaceful rallies against encroaching federal government, specifically Obamacare. Needless to say, the landmark was greeted in hostile fashion by the paper. The headline gave this backhanded compliment: “Tea Party Failed to Tame Deficits, but It Succeeded in Fueling Rage.” Peters launched his account with loaded language that stereotyped limited government Tea Party advocates as crazed, angry, and (after pressure from liberal readers) racist radicals.



On Tuesday afternoon, MSNBC hosts Ali Velshi and Stephanie Ruhle marveled at an unhinged diatribe delivered by left-wing Princeton University professor and MSNBC contributor Eddie Glaude during Monday’s Deadline: White House. In the nasty rant, Glaude dismissed the “myth” of American “goodness,” referred to the conservative Tea Party movement as the “ugly underbelly of the country,” and labeled President Trump the “manifestation of the ugliness that’s in us.”     



Chris Pratt has gotten himself into some hot water in the last couple of days for wearing the classic Gadsden “Don’t Tread on Me” flag T-shirt. It’s racist, don’t ya know, having been adopted by Idaho Hitler Youth groups and Waffen SS sewing circles. But then again, some portion of Americans are dumb enough to let Colin “Pig Socks” Kaepernick tell them the Betsy Ross flag symbolizes slavery. Why not go down this rabbit hole too?



CNN chief White House correspondent and cartoonishly self-centered Jim Acosta released on Tuesday his 353-page work of narcissism, The Enemy of the People: A Dangerous Time to Tell the Truth in America. And, folks, it’s everything you thought it would be and then some. CNN chief White House correspondent and cartoonishly self-centered Jim Acosta released on Tuesday his 354-page work of narcissism, The Enemy of the People. And, folks, it’s everything you thought it would be and then some. 



Pardon the interruption, Tony Kornheiser, but isn't your show of the same name supposed to be about sports, and not a platform for you to promote Democrat candidates? Yet in the closing segment of yesterday's PTI, Kornheiser managed to work in a plug for Mark Kelly, a Dem candidate for senator from Arizona. Kelly is the husband of former Dem Rep. Gabrielle Giffords. Kelly and Giffords became prominent gun-control advocates after she survived an assassination attempt in 2011. Kornheiser wished Happy 55th Birthday to Kelly and his twin brother Scott, then added: "Mark Kelly is running for the Senate in Arizona."



During Wednesday’s The Ingraham Angle, host Laura Ingraham pointed out how the media strenuously objects to the use of the word “mob” to describe left-wing protesters but did not seem to mind using the word “mob” at all when describing tea party protesters back in 2009.



After an 11-minute-long Get Out the Vote (GOTV) effort for Democrats on Tuesday’s Hardball, MSNBC pundit Chris Matthews falsely claimed that anti-Kavanaugh protesters weren’t paid to physically corner and verbally harass Senators or try to break into the Supreme Court, comparing claims the mob was paid for to birtherism concerning Barack Obama. If that wasn’t enough, cable news pleaser and faux Republican David Jolly hailed the leftist mob while suggesting that the Tea Party movement itself is violent. 



Remember folks, Vox gonna Vox. Moments after Arizona Republican Senator John McCain’s death on Saturday night, Vox.com sent out a since-deleted tweet that “[y]ou can draw a straight line from John McCain to Donald Trump — through Sarah Palin” that accompanied a piece by politics editor Laura McGann which, in the original version, couldn’t correctly identify the origin of Palin’s “lipstick” comment.



In 2010, some Obamacare opponents conducted scattered protests at politicians' homes. They backed away from the tactic when Tea Party groups and others declared that home protests should be out of bounds. Don't expect leftist protesters to receive any similar admonishments — especially if they continue to receive borderline-sympathetic coverage like protesting gun-control promoters, and even a person arrested for vandalism, received at the Washington Post on Friday.



In a Wednesday "analysis" piece anticipating the tax bill's passage, Andrew Taylor at the Associated Press, apparently bitter at the impending outcome, framed that successful effort as a betrayal of the "GOP's tea party promises." Apparently, the AP reporter has forgotten what the T-E-A in "tea party" stands for.



Those who believe history is presumptively written by the winners haven't seen Francis Wilkinson's attempt to create a bogus narrative on the four-year IRS scandal which appeared at Bloomberg News on Monday. 



A Louisville Courier Journal item currently carried at USA Today by reporter Thomas Novelly seems to imply that Rand Paul deserved to be blindsided, tackled and to have possibly life-threatening serious injuries inflicted on him Friday afternoon. After all, the headline reads: "Rand Paul is not a perfect neighbor" — according to the developer of the gated community in which Paul and Rene Boucher, the alleged perpetrator, both live.