Appearing as a guest on Wednesday's CNN Newsroom, CNN senior political reporter Nia-Malika Henderson claimed that the Republican party has been "playing the race card" for "many decades" as she commented on Republican reaction to President Donald Trump's recent comments in which he seemed to give cover to white racist rally participants in Charlottesville.

 


Generally, when celebrity ambulance chaser Gloria Allred calls a press conference, you can be sure some perversion of justice is about to be attempted. But what if she’s attempting to bring a pervert to justice?


Moments after President Trump condemned white supremacists by name during a White House address on Monday about the violence in Charlottesville, a panel of MSNBC reporters and pundits immediately proclaimed that the President “didn’t do enough” and should not get credit for meeting the “lowest possible bar.”
 


After all three broadcast networks spent Sunday blaming President Trump for the deadly violence in Charlottesville, Virginia over the weekend, in an exclusive interview with NBC News aired on Monday’s Today show, Vice President Mike Pence took the liberal media to task for its biased coverage.


When Islamic extremists attack a military awards ceremony on a primetime television show, you can bet that within a few episodes it will be made clear that the suicide-vested attackers shouting “Allahu Akbar” will be absolved. The terrorism was just an act, theater for the witnesses and victims meant to distract the populace from the real attackers. In Shooter, the real perpetrator is our very own government—and possibly the United Nations.


During Sunday's AM Joy on MSNBC, during discussions of the white racist rally in Charlottesville, Virginia, White House advisors were repeatedly referred to by panel members as "Nazis" or "white supremacists." And in one segment, as the group fretted over Colin Kaepernick's outcast status in the NFL, ESPN columnist William C. Rhoden oddly claimed that "a lot of players" in both the NFL and Major League Baseball "have kind of support from these people -- the Nazis or white supremacists," as host Joy Reid responded in agreement.

 


On Saturday's AM Joy, recurring MSNBC guest Kurt Bardella hyperbolically claimed that the white racist rally taking place in Charlottesville, Virginia, "is the Republican party on display," and declared that "a lot of" Republican policies are "racist." He also took aim at the right-leaning Breitbart News as he alleged that the rally -- which by that point had turned violent -- "is exactly the kind of stuff that they want to have happen and they hope to spread elsewhere."

 


On Tuesday morning, the Associated Press left no doubt that it does not want to see detailed news of the outrageous United Auto Workers-Fiat Chrysler training scandal spread beyond Metro Detroit. In an unbylined item which digested far longer reports seen at Detroit's major newspapers down to five paragraphs, the wire service kept the union out of its headline, failed to mention the union until the fourth paragraph, and omitted almost all of the details which caused a Chrysler financial analyst to plead guilty to his role in the conspiracy.


Talking to NBC News Medical Correspondent Dr. John Torres on Friday about the Trump administration promising aggressive action on the nationwide opioid crisis, MSNBC anchor Craig Melvin worried that the focus on the deadly drug abuse epidemic was based on race.


The Washington Post published a 2,000-word story Thursday which attempted to portray DC-area anarchists who attempted to disrupt and ruin President Donald Trump's inauguration in January as being interested in "more than just smashing windows." The best answer to what "more" is in Perry Stein's report is that it's about destroying as much property belonging to others as possible once it's clear that attempts to stop or seriously disrupt planned events have failed — oh, and getting away with it.


Appearing as a guest on Sunday's CNN Newsroom to preview their episode of The Nineties about terrorism, CNN national security analyst Juliette Kayyem was twisting herself into knots to downplay the threat of terrorism from radical Muslims by claiming that the "biggest threat" is from "white supremacists or sort of anti-government terrorism."

 


On Friday's This Morning show, CBS News reporter Adriana Diaz reported on her seven days on the streets of Chicago's South Side, one of the most dangerous and crime-ridden areas in the U.S. While her report gamely tried to focus on how guns were to blame for the violence, astute observers who know how difficult it is for law-abiding citizens to get guns in the Windy City will notice that, despite those state- and city-imposed barriers, it's still very "easy" for criminals to get guns.