Appearing as a guest on Friday's Real Time with Bill Maher on HBO, New York Times opinion editor Bari Weiss not only complained about the media and her own paper's tendency to pander to what excites the Twittersphere, but she also called out her fellow left-wingers who have been tolerant of anti-Semitism.



It might have been football Sunday, but CBS and Face the Nation moderator Margaret Brennan offered up slow-pitch softballs to anti-Semitic Congresswoman Ilhan Omar (MN). Downplaying her guest’s “sometimes controversial” comments, Brennan asked simple questions that allowed Omar to freely make excuses. Of course, Brennan ignored Omar’s raging anti-Semitism.



By now many readers have heard the tale. The New York Times, on the 18th anniversary of 9/11, tweeted out the following, bold print for emphasis supplied: “18 years have passed since airplanes took aim and brought down the World Trade Center. Today families will once again gather and grieve at the site where more than 2000 people died.”



MSNBC host Nicolle Wallace couldn’t help but make the 18 year anniversary of the deadliest terror attack on American soil about herself and her peers in the press. In a tweet Wednesday evening, Wallace admitted the first thing she thinks about on this solemn day of remembrance, is how the press is under attack by President Trump.



Former George W. Bush's Bullhorn Speech is one of the most defining and iconic moments in American history, the only thing that compares to it is Franklin Roosevelt's Day of Infamy speech. Unfortunately, CNN Newsroom co-host Poppy Harlow tried to use the sense of national unity in the circumstances of Bush's speech on the eighteenth anniversary of the 9/11 terrorist attacks to push gun control.



It's now been nearly a full generation since Sept. 11, 2001. There are people currently serving in the U.S. military who weren't born when that act of evil took place — and the military still has thousands of troops in Afghanistan, the home base of the Taliban-supported al Qaida attack on the United States that took nearly 3,000 American lives.



Just as he did during last year’s name-reading at the 9/11 remembrance ceremony at Ground Zero, 9/11 victim Nicholas Haros Jr. used his time to speak to those in Washington, D.C. who fail in their duty to treat the day with reverence. On Wednesday, his denouncement was of anti-Semitic Congresswoman Ilhan Omar (D-MN) for her infamous “some people did something” chide against the solemn day.



In an effort to avoid discussing terrorist culpability for 9/11, the New York Times on Wednesday embarrassed itself with a tweet and article commemorating September 11, 2001.  Speaking of inanimate objects, the Times Twitter page declared, “Eighteen years have passed since airplanes took aim at the World Trade Center and brought them down.”



Mika Brzezinski has taken to an ugly new level the liberal media's accusations against President Trump in the wake of the weekend's mass shootings. On today's Morning Joe, Brzezinski actually accused the President of wanting such mass murders to happen: "Isn’t it okay to deduce that at this point this is what he wants? . . . I mean, this is a President who seems to want these things to happen. How else can this be explained?"



Amidst the liberal media’s Beto-like treatment for Kentucky senatorial candidate Amy McGrath (D) and NBC’s hit piece against McGrath opponent and Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell, CNN’s The Lead host Jake Tapper didn’t follow in lockstep on Tuesday, pressing McGrath on her long odds and her gross analogy comparing the 2016 election to September 11, 2001.



Activist and actor Riz Ahmed (The Night Of, Rogue One) gave a presentation on how it's "super scary" to be a Muslim in Hollywood on Tuesday at CAA (Creative Artists Agency) Amplify, an annual conference to promote diversity and inclusion in the entertainment industry.



On Friday's Real Time show on HBO, liberal comedian Bill Maher was showing his unpatriotic side as he not only declared that the military budget should be cut in half, but he also griped about the tradition of playing God Bless America at sporting events that began after the 9/11 attacks.