Other than 9/11, not much happened in 2001. CBS This Morning co-host Norah O’Donnell on Monday excluded the September 11th terror attacks in order to conclude that there have been “three times” as many “right wing” violence. 


Veteran journalist Kurt Andersen’s 13,000-word cover story for the September issue of The Atlantic, “How America Lost Its Mind," is an attack on Trump and what he sees as the Republican Party's recent retreat from reality, but skips Democratic embrace of conspiracy theories, and assumes the news was fair and balanced before Rush Limbaugh's "unending and immersive propaganda" and Fox News came along.


Appearing as a guest on Sunday's CNN Newsroom to preview their episode of The Nineties about terrorism, CNN national security analyst Juliette Kayyem was twisting herself into knots to downplay the threat of terrorism from radical Muslims by claiming that the "biggest threat" is from "white supremacists or sort of anti-government terrorism."

 


For now, everyone knows the sonorous name and cherubic face of 8-year-old Saffie Rose Roussos. She's the littlest known victim of Monday night's jihad attack in Manchester, England. Her doe-eyed image spread as rapidly across social media as the #PrayForManchester hashtags and Twitter condolences from celebrities.


Appearing as a guest on Monday's Andrea Mitchell Reports on MSNBC, New York Times columnist Tom Friedman incorrectly claimed that there has only been one case of a foreign-born terrorist staging an attack in the United States when there have, in fact, been a significant number of cases. Friedman: "Of course we want people vetted. I mean, but who said the vetting system had failed us? What is the proof of that? The Orlando attack was done by an American-born Muslim, Boston basically the same thing. There was a case obviously in San Bernardino. That's, you know, one out of how many?"


Appearing as a panel member on Sunday's Fareed Zakaria GPS on CNN, former MSNBC and Newsweek contributor Rula Jebreal had one of the biggest on-air blow-ups against a fellow liberal that you're likely to witness all year. As the group discussed President Donald Trump's recent executive order halting immigration from seven predominantly Muslim countries, after Jebreal repeatedly claimed that the order was in reality motivated by a "white supremacist agenda," liberal George Washington University law professor Jonathan Turley admonished her for making such inflammatory charges.

This did not sit well with Jebreal, who jumped in to shout at Turley for more than a minute as she accused him of defending a "Muslim ban" even though the liberal GWU professor was voicing opposition to the measure. Jebreal: "It is a Muslim ban, sir, and it is outrageous -- it's baffling that you are trying to normalize it or even defend it or justify it! You're betraying American values! This is outrageous!"


Appearing as a panel member on Thursday's Anderson Cooper 360, during a discussion of Muslim-Americans "self-radicalizing' and becoming terrorists, liberal CNN political commentator Van Jones at one point blamed Donald Trump for allegedly causing some to "self-radicalize." As conservative CNN political commentator Jack Kingston argued in favor of studies to help answer the question of why "lone wolf" terrorists "became radical," Jones jumped in to inject: "When people say stuff like Trump. Trump kind of helps make people radical, but go ahead."


Major similarities between the 2016 presidential election and that of 2000 don’t end with the Democrat winning the popular vote but losing the electoral vote, claims Marcotte, who contended that the media had it in for Hillary Clinton the same way they did for Al Gore, and that in each case biased campaign coverage was a factor in driving down Democratic voter turnout. Regarding this year’s race, Marcotte remarked, “Replace ‘I invented the internet’ with ‘emails,’ ‘Naomi Wolf’ with ‘pneumonia’ and ‘Ralph Nader’ with ‘Jill Stein,’ and you’re looking at a rerun.”


The weekend before Election Day, Jake Tapper at CNN, interviewing Democratic Minnesota Senator Al Franken, used the classic "some people say" tactic to allege that there were anti-Semitic undertones in the Donald Trump campaign's closing ad. Why? Because three of the many people briefly pictured in the ad, in which the candidate criticized the political establishment's attitudes and actions which he believes have hurt everyday Americans, happen to be Jewish.

So you might expect that Tapper, CNN, and for that matter the rest of the establishment press would be extensively investigating and reporting on the years of anti-Semitic activities and remarks of Democrat Keith Ellison, especially now that the Minnesota congressman is in the running to be the next director of the Democratic National Committee. Nope.


It’s okay to call President Obama cool again, according to NBC’s Superstore. Quite the change from 2012 when almost anything said about him was considered racist, including the word “cool.”


On Friday, a Virginia jury determined that Rolling Stone magazine defamed former University of Virginia associate dean of students Nicole Eramo when it published, and then refused to fully retract, its 9,000-word November 2014 "A Rape on Campus" story — and that the magazine did so with malice.


CNN’s Jake Tapper on Thursday called out Barack Obama for featuring a 9/11 truther celebrity at a White House event this week. The rapper, who has repeatedly pushed conspiracy theories blaming George W. Bush for the September 11th 2001 terrorist attacks, appeared at a panel discussion on drug abuse in America. On The Lead, Tapper wondered, “Is it acceptable... for the White House which has a war against birthers, and rightly so, to have a truther come to the White House?”