CBS, NBC Forced to Admit Tariff Threats Causing Mexico to Take Action

Despite decrying President Trump’s threats to impose escalating tariffs on goods from Mexico, the CBS Evening News and NBC Nightly News were forced Thursday to admit the tactic appeared to be working as intended. But that didn’t stop them from continuing to whine anyway.

NBC anchor Lester Holt led into the story by remarking that “there are new signs of progress in the high-stakes trade talks between the U.S. and Mexico as we are days away from the U.S. imposing a tax on all Mexican goods.”

“It is the latest threat in President Trump's growing trade war and experts warned Americans will pay a price,” he then chided.

As he began his report, correspondent Tom Costello echoed Holt’s announcement that “progress” was being made. “A potential compromise would include Mexico deploying 6,000 troops to its border with Guatemala to stem the flow of Central American migrants,” he reported.

CBS White House correspondent Weijia Jiang had more to add on that front, recalling that “Mexico has pledged to change its asylum policy so that migrants would apply for asylum there instead of continuing to the U.S.

Jiang also showed a scene of Mexican authorities breaking up a caravan of 1,000 migrants heading north:

Clashes erupted along a southern Mexico highway as 200 police officers and immigration agents blocked 1,000 migrants from Central America on Wednesday. Mexican officials say the confrontation shows the government is cracking down on illegal migration. But President Trump says it needs to do more or the U.S. will impose an escalating tariff on all Mexican goods, starting at five percent on Monday.

 

 

But she also highlighted Mexican Foreign Minister Marcelo Ebrard warning the U.S. not to implement the tariffs: “The tariffs could be very costly for the U.S. economy, the consumers in the United States, and the Mexican economy.”

The threat of tariffs seemed to be doing their job of forcing Mexico to actually do something to stem illegal crossings into the U.S., which meant that the tariffs themselves might not be implemented. At least not right away.

That didn’t stop Costello from trying to stoke the fears of NBC viewers (click “expand”):

COSTELLO: But most analysts and economists say American consumers would pay the tariffs, not the Mexican government. Starting at five percent as soon as Monday, rising to 25 percent by October. U.S. automakers with plants in Mexico could be forced to raise car prices. CNBC's Phil LeBeau is in Mexico.

LEBEAU: It has the potential to drive up the price of a vehicle imported from Mexico by several hundred dollars, if not several thousand dollars.

COSTELLO: Meanwhile, half the ingredient at Tito’s Mexican Restaurant in Ann Arbor, Michigan come from Mexico. Owner Jeremy Sievers expects he'll be forced to raise prices.

“High state diplomacy with everyday Americans caught in the middle,” Costello lamented.

The transcripts are below, click "expand" to read:

CBS Evening News
June 6, 2019
6:40:40 p.m. Eastern

DAVID BEGNAUD: The Trump administration says they're going to push forward with plans to slap tariffs on exports from Mexico starting Monday. The President is demanding that Mexico do more to crack down on illegal immigration from Central America. Here's Weijia Jiang.

[Cuts to video]

WEIJIA JIANG: Clashes erupted along a southern Mexico highway as 200 police officers and immigration agents blocked 1,000 migrants from Central America on Wednesday. Mexican officials say the confrontation shows the government is cracking down on illegal migration. But President Trump says it needs to do more or the U.S. will impose an escalating tariff on all Mexican goods, starting at five percent on Monday.

PRESIDENT DONALD TRUMP: We told Mexico, the tariffs go on, and I mean it, too, and I'm very happy with it.

JIANG: CBS News has learned Mexico offered to deploy 6,000 troops to its border with Guatemala, but the White House said that was not enough. Now Mexico has pledged to change its asylum policy so that migrants would apply for asylum there instead of continuing to the U.S. An administration source described that as encouraging.

Mexico's foreign minister, who is in Washington for negotiations, said both sides should want to avoid tariffs.

MARCELO EBRARD (foreign minister of Mexico): The tariffs could be very costly for the U.S. economy, the consumers in the United States, and the Mexican economy.

[Cuts back to live]

JIANG: A White House official tells CBS News President Trump and his Mexican counterpart have not spoken directly, and David, they are the only two people who can strike a deal.

BEGNAUD: We'll be watching Monday. Thank you, Weijia.

 

NBC Nightly News
June 6, 2019
7:09:03 p.m. Eastern

LESTER HOLT: Tonight, there are new signs of progress in the high-stakes trade talks between the U.S. and Mexico as we are days away from the U.S. imposing a tax on all Mexican goods. It is the latest threat in President Trump's growing trade war and experts warned Americans will pay a price. Here’s Tom Costello.

[Cuts to video]

TOM COSTELLO: Tonight, administration sources report progress in talks with Mexico aiming at avoiding a first round of tariffs on Monday. A potential compromise would include Mexico deploying 6,000 troops to its border with Guatemala to stem the flow of Central American migrants. Earlier in the day, the President doubled down on his threat of tariffs if a deal isn’t struck.

PRESIDENT DONALD TRUMP: Tariffs is a beautiful thing; it’s a beautiful word. If you know how to use them properly. Republicans should love what I’m doing.

COSTELLO: But most analysts and economists say American consumers would pay the tariffs, not the Mexican government. Starting at five percent as soon as Monday, rising to 25 percent by October.

U.S. automakers with plants in Mexico could be forced to raise car prices. CNBC's Phil LeBeau is in Mexico.

PHIL LEBEAU: It has the potential to drive up the price of a vehicle imported from Mexico by several hundred dollars, if not several thousand dollars.

COSTELLO: Meanwhile, half the ingredient at Tito’s Mexican Restaurant in Ann Arbor, Michigan come from Mexico. Owner Jeremy Sievers expects he'll be forced to raise prices.

JEREMY SIEVERS: This is going to hurt local small businesses and this not good for America, this is not good for us, this is not good for anyone.

COSTELLO: High state diplomacy with everyday Americans caught in the middle. Tom Costello, NBC News, Washington.

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