Giddy MSNBC Host Brings on Wendy Davis, Asks ‘Where Those Pink Sneakers Are’ Now

Moments after the Supreme Court handed down a ruling on Monday morning that struck down a pro-life Texas law, MSNBC Live host Thomas Roberts brought on none other than former Democratic Texas State Senator and liberal hero Wendy Davis to discuss how she “was fighting back tears” seconds before her live shot and inquired about “where those pink sneakers are” from her 2013 filibuster for abortion.

“One person, who was really against this and catapulted to fame over it, because of the filibuster that she performed in her pink sneakers there on the Texas statehouse floor, was Senator Wendy Davis and Wendy Davis joins us right now,” Roberts began with a wide grin.

Davis smiled as well at the far-left ruling, telling Roberts that she’s “overjoyed” and “was fighting back tears a moment ago as I was reading the SCOTUS blog and the first line that cut saying that the Fifth Circuit opinion or decision had been reversed.”

“It’s incredible news for the women of Texas. It's incredible news for women throughout country,” Davis added.

Roberts inquired next about what will happen to abortion clinics in Texas seeing as how the now-struck-down law had dwindled them down to just 19: “Do you think that Texas rebound back to that number of 42, to where they were prior to law? Or is that going to be very slow for the women of Texas to see that happening.”

The MSNBC host’s fears were put to rest as Davis emphasized that “it's going to take several months, I think, to see us rebound...but I know there are many people and organizations that are committed to making sure that that health care is returned and that women have their reproductive freedoms restored in Texas.”

Closing out the first of three blocks with Davis, Roberts came across as a total fan when he twice pressed her on the location of the pink sneakers she wore during the (unsuccessful) filibuster: 

ROBERTS: So in thinking about this now and, you ran for governor, after the filibuster that — that as  it skyrocketed you because of those pink sneakers, I'm not sure if you’ve put those in any type of hall of fame in Texas, or if they're still somewhere in your closet, but does this make you want to get back into Texas politics again? 

(....)

ROBERTS: It is a big moment. Can you clarify, though, where those pink sneakers are, just for folks who are watching? 

DAVIS: Yes, they're safely tucked away in storage and, of course, I cherish them and always will. 

In the final block before carrying live a Hillary Clinton rally, Roberts pleaded with Davis to tell him stories of how difficult and painful it was for women (and not, say, their babies) to travel long distances for abortions or suffer “consequences” for carrying a baby to birth. Of course, Davis dutifully obliged:

The proponents of overturning this law wanted very much to make sure that the justices saw this through the human prism of what the consequences had been. Some of the stories came from women had not been able to access safe and legal abortion, and had carried a pregnancy to term, one that they felt they could not afford. Many of the people who choose to terminate a pregnancy already have children there trying to support and some of the stories came from women like that. They also came from women who had to go through incredibly expense and effort, missing work, traveling long distances in order to access their abortion care and also stories of women who had to wait, what feels like an interminable amount of time because of the backblog the 19 clinics that continued to exist[.]

The relevant portions of the transcript from MSNBC Live with Thomas Roberts on June 27 can be found below.

MSNBC Live with Thomas Roberts
June 27, 2016
10:09 a.m. Eastern

THOMAS ROBERTS: One person, who was really against this and catapulted to fame over it, because of the filibuster that she performed in her pink sneakers there on the Texas statehouse floor, was Senator Wendy Davis and Wendy Davis joins us right now. I want your reaction first about this because at the time, your filibuster did not work. So your first reaction to what the supreme court is saying? 

WENDY DAVIS: Well, I'm overjoyed. I have to tell you, I was fighting back tears a moment ago as I was reading the SCOTUS blog and the first line that cut saying that the Fifth Circuit opinion or decision had been reversed. It’s incredible news for the women of Texas. It's incredible news for women throughout country. 

ROBERTS: Wendy, what do you think, though, will happen now, as Pete us there, in the reduction of clinics from 42 to 19. Have had to either travel long distances to find safe places to receive medical care, if they are terminating a pregnancy. Do you think that Texas rebound back to that number of 42, to where they were prior to law? Or is that going to be very slow for the women of Texas to see that happening. 

DAVIS: it's going to take several months, I think, to see us rebound to place where women throughout the state, have the access that they once had prior to this law going into effect. But I know there are many people and organizations that are committed to making sure that that health care is returned and that women have their reproductive freedoms restored in Texas. 

(....) 

ROBERTS: So in thinking about this now and, you ran for governor, after the filibuster that — that as  it skyrocketed you because of those pink sneakers, I'm not sure if you’ve put those in any type of hall of fame in Texas, or if they're still somewhere in your closet, but does this make you want to get back into Texas politics again? 

DAVIS: Well, I'm never stepping away from Texas politics. Whether I'm in office or not in office, I’m continued the work very hard to make sure that gender equality is advanced in this country. Of course, reproductive rights are an incredibly important part of that and I could not be happier in this moment, talking to you about the decision that we received from the Supreme Court today.

ROBERTS: It is a big moment. Can you clarify, though, where those pink sneakers are, just for folks who are watching? 

DAVIS: Yes, they're safely tucked away in storage and, of course, I cherish them and always will. 

ROBERTS: Alright, Wendy, thank you so much. 

(....)

ROBERTS: And we know Hillary Clinton in this one tweet, women won't be, quote, “punished for exercising their basic rights,” that “punish” word in reference to Donald Trump, an interview, a town hall he had with Chris Matthews right here on MSNBC, where Chris pushed him on that, saying, should women receive some form of punishment? And he said yes, if abortion were to be made illegal. This was probably one of the only times we’ve ever seen in American history where pro-life and pro-choice advocates were against the statement of that, of punishing the woman, who — 

DAVIS: Well you know, he kind of laid bare the inconsistency in the anti-abortion argument which is characterized as though abortion is murder, on the one hand, but then on the other hand, shies away from going as far as saying that women who commit this act ought to be considered for any kind of punishment. What Donald Trump said actually was more consistent than what the anti-abortion has said along. And I think he really did, as I said, laid bare the inconsistency in their argument. You cannot characterize it as murder on the one hand and then shy away from what you know will be a public blacklash on the other hand, if you go that one step further and say that women taught to be punished for exercising this constitutional right. 

(....)

ROBERTS: Former Senator Wendy Davis of Texas is still here and Wendy, I just wanted to ask you because of the platform that you had in talking about this, in fighting for access for women, I'm sure you probably heard over the years, many personal stories of women that have been affected by what happened, post 2013. Can you tell us some of the stories that you may have heard? 

DAVIS: Well, the formed the 65 amicus briefs that were file before the Supreme Court. The proponents of overturning this law wanted very much to make sure that the justices saw this through the human prism of what the consequences had been. Some of the stories came from women had not been able to access safe and legal abortion, and had carried a pregnancy to term, one that they felt they could not afford. Many of the people who choose to terminate a pregnancy already have children there trying to support and some of the stories came from women like that. They also came from women who had to go through incredibly expense and effort, missing work, traveling long distances in order to access their abortion care and also stories of women who had to wait, what feels like an interminable amount of time because of the backblog the 19 clinics that continued to exist, having to take up all of the need that arose, as a consequence of closure of the other 21 or 22. 

Tell the Truth 2016 NB Daily Campaigns & Elections 2016 Presidential Judiciary Media Bias Debate Covert Liberal Activists Political Groups Conservatives & Republicans Liberals & Democrats Pro-choicers Pro-lifers Sexuality Abortion MSNBC MSNBC Live with Thomas Roberts Video Government & Press U.S. Supreme Court Thomas Roberts Wendy Davis
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