Abortions are safe for everyone, according to one Salon writer. Except for the unborn baby, that is. According to Amanda Marcotte, a politics writer for Salon, abortions are even safer than “carrying an unwanted pregnancy to term.” On Friday, she argued that “for decades” Americans have been subject to misinformation that “paint[s] abortion as some kind of dangerous and gruesome medical intervention” that is “born out of desperation.”



The comfortable victory by pro-choice abortion forces in Ireland was widely reported last month. But what is less known is the active role social media networks such as Google, Facebook and YouTube played during the electoral process, and its impact on the results.

 



A new Supreme Court action could potentially prevent future abortions. So of course feminist writers are calling it “absolutely tragic.” On Monday, the Supreme Court of the United States released an unsigned per curiam, or unanimous decision erasing a lower-court ruling that allowed “Jane Doe,” a 17-year-old immigrant who entered the country illegally, to obtain an abortion.



On Wednesday, Ricardo Alonso-Zaldivar and David Crary of the Associated Press hyped that the "the Trump administration is remaking government policy on reproductive health — moving to limit access to birth control and abortion." The pair spotlighted how "social and religious conservatives praise the administration,'" but failed to give an ideological label for the "women's-rights activists...[who] view the multi-pronged changes as a dangerous ideological shift." The journalists also slanted towards the pro-abortion side by quoting six critics of the Trump policy shift, versus just three supporters.



The scientific, moral and theological battle between life as an "endowed unalienable" right and the evolutionary view that we are just material and energy shaped by pure chance in a random universe with no author of life, no purpose for living and no destination after we die has been won in Ireland by the evolutionists.



On his Friday Fox News show, Tucker Carlson interviewed Nick Loeb, co-producer of Roe v. Wade, a dramatic film which plans to show viewers "what happened from 1966 through 1973" that led to the Supreme Court's decision declaring existing laws against abortion unconstitutional. Carlson's interview concentrated primarily on obstacles Loeb has faced in funding the film — obstacles which have included overt and covert suppression of his efforts on Facebook. Loeb also revealed that the film will show America "how the media was manipulated" during that critical period.



On Thursday's All Things Considered, NPR predictably hyped the impact of scandals involving the Catholic Church during their coverage of Ireland's abortion vote. Correspondent Alice Fordham noted that "during this ferociously noisy national debate [over abortion], the Church's role has seemed muted." She emphasized that "the Church's credibility in Ireland has suffered, after investigations uncovered child abuse and institutional abuse of unmarried mothers." Fordham later underlined that "many of those affected by the...abuses hope this referendum will mark a decisive defeat" for the Church.



Hollywood is rallying for the abortion industry once again – this time in support of taxpayer funding. On Tuesday night, President Trump announced a proposal at the Susan B. Anthony List gala that would prohibit Title X federal funding from organizations that provide or promote abortion. In reaction to the proposal, several celebrities, like Jane Fonda and Jessica Biel, expressed fury that abortion giant Planned Parenthood might lose funding and tweeted out “#NoGagRule.”



A Wednesday article from CNN touted the involvement of young American volunteers during the final days of a pro-life campaign in Ireland. Correspondent Kara Fox zeroed in on how Irish pro-abortion activists blasted one pro-life couple for their supposedly "deceptive" ways. Fox later spotlighted that "some Irish are outraged by foreign groups...arguing that American campaigners are using their vacations to stage a proxy war on women's rights in their country." She also failed to mention the involvement of Americans on the pro-abortion side.



Christianity points to the cross as the epitome of love: a total gift of self-sacrifice in order to save others. But a new magazine op-ed is arguing the opposite: that love is about looking out for me, myself, and I. For Mother’s Day, Glamour published a May 11 opinion piece with the headline, “How Motherhood Made Me a Better Abortion Provider.” Abortionist Ghazaleh Moayedi, an OB/GYN and Physicians for Reproductive Health fellow, argued that motherhood brought her to the conclusion that abortion is an “act of love.”



It may be cliché to say, but in the case of NBC’s high-school drama Rise, it’s true: Just when you think things couldn’t get any worse, Rise hits a new low.



On Tuesday's New Day, CNN host Alisyn Camerota gave former Planned Parenthood president Cecile Richards a forum to brag about the pro-abortion group's success in pushing its agenda into ObamaCare, and to complain about those who wish to end taxpayer funding of the prominent abortion provider. She also gushed over her liberal guest's "legendary" mother, former Democratic Governor Ann Richards, and asked if she planned to run for political office.