During an appearance on Meet the Press, former House Speaker Newt Gingrich said that as a result of the liberal media there are certain issues that Republicans cannot run on and expect to win. Speaking to Chuck Todd, Gingrich insisted that conservatives can only win on issues with 70 or 80 percent support and Republicans “cannot run in a country that has liberal media with 51 percent issues and expect to win because they will strip away six percent.”



Scott Shane's front-page New York Times Tuesday on a liberal mosque in Boston, a city that's hosted a growing number of Islamic terrorists and extremists, focused on a liberal mosque that promotes tolerance: "Muslims Work To Shed Stigma Tied to Terror – in Boston, a Tolerant Vision of Islam." But Shane's feverish defense of peaceful American Muslims calls up questions of his own previous story, that blamed conservative critics of Islam for fomenting international Islamic extremism.



On Sunday’s This Week with George Stephanopoulos, Robert Reich, former Labor Secretary for Bill Clinton, surprisingly criticized Hillary Clinton over her foundations’s donation issues and insisted “full disclosure is a key vulnerability” for her candidacy.



How bad are things getting for Hillary when the best defense some supporters can muster is that there was no corruption because Bill bilked the people who thought they were bribing her?

Last week, we reported on Hillary fan Dorian Warren suggesting that Bill was "running serious game on many of these countries saying oh, I'll talk to my wife, give me the check, and then never mentioning [it.]" On today's Morning Joe, Mike Barnicle made that same argument, claiming there was no quid pro quo because knowing Bill, he took the money saying "yeah, sure, I'll call him for you, and he'll never call."  Interestingly, Mika Brzezinski wasn't buying, saying that Newt's allegations of bribery "made sense."



Celebrities, high-profile executives and media outlets gunning for Indiana Gov. Mike Pence and the state’s new religious freedom law are a “lynch mob,” Newt Gingrich said today in a HuffPost Live interview.

Everyone from singer Miley Cyrus to Apple CEO Tim Cook has taken a shot at Indiana SB 101, legislation that the “lynch mob” has decided opens a universal door for discrimination against gay people.



On Sunday morning, former Speaker of the House Newt Gingrich appeared on CBS’s Face the Nation to discuss a variety of topics including the ongoing controversy involving Congressman Steve Scalise (R-La.). During the conversation, moderator Bob Schieffer did his best to tie Scalise’s 2002 speech to the entire Republican brand. The CBS host suggested that “aren’t Republicans going to have to find some way to appeal to Hispanics and African Americans and what is that way because I think you would agree right now if you just look at it, it doesn't look like they're doing very much.”



Following President Barack Obama’s speech announcing his executive order on illegal immigration, CNN political commentator and former Speaker of the House Newt Gingrich unloaded on the President, likening his speech to statements made by ObamaCare architect Jonathan Gruber and that those in the “elite” class “really underestimate” the disdain Americans have for unfortified borders.

Responding on CNN in the minutes after it ended, Gingrich opined that it was wrong for the President to go against the incoming Congress as it had “repudiated his policies in the election” a few weeks ago. Gingrich then slammed what viewers just heard as “a Gruber speech” where the President was “simply not telling the country the truth.”



On Tuesday, Turner Broadcasting, the parent company of CNN,  started the process of cancelling several of the news network's series, including the reboot of Crossfire, and began laying off hundreds of employees. Chris Ariens at the TVNewser blog reported that "as many as 300, or 8%, of CNN's workforce is being cut." Ariens later noted that "Jane Velez Mitchell's nightly HLN show has been canceled, part of deep cuts at CNN."



Marc Lamont Hill, liberal CNN contributor and host of HuffPost Live, appeared on Sunday’s State of the Union with Candy Crowley and did his best to smear former Secretary of Defense Leon Panetta for daring to criticize President Obama on foreign policy. Appearing alongside Neera Tanden, Newt Gingrich and S.E. Cupp, Hill proclaimed that Panetta’s criticism of Obama was “the most disgusting example of Monday morning quarterbacking I have ever seen.” 



On Sunday's State of the Union, Candy Crowley teased into a commercial break: "Next, this week's jaw-dropping moment in politics.The party of women slamming the woman who is supposed to be in charge. We'll ask our political panel who is behind the backstabbing."

That's not "what they call the party of women," just "the party of women." The Female Party.



“Don't go away mad,” an old saying goes, “just go away.” That seems to be the case with David Gregory, who is receiving a grand total of $4 million to end his six-year tenure as host of the NBC News Meet the Press program.

Part of the 43-year-old anchor's contract is a “nondisparagement clause,” which specifies that he is not to speak out against the network, according to an article written by Emily Smith and Stephanie Smith of the Page Six website.



Newt Gingrich hasn’t been an elected official in more than fifteen years, but according to Mother Jones blogger Kevin Drum, Gingrich’s vitriolic approach to politics during his years in the House of Representatives remains influential via Fox News. (Even though Gingrich stars on CNN.)

Piggybacking on an Andrew Sullivan blog post in which Sullivan alleged that watching Fox News was “like slipping into an alternative universe” where “hysteria is the constant norm,” Drum wrote on Thursday that Gingrich “brought conservative politics to a truly new, truly unprecedented level of toxic rancor,” and that Fox News is now “the ongoing, institutional expression of Gingrichism.”