The Hillary Clinton campaign released the 2015 joint federal income tax return filed by Mrs. Clinton and her ex-President husband Bill this week. Among other things, the Clintons reported total income of over $10.7 million, incurred income and self-employment taxes of over $3.6 million, and deducted $1 million for a charitable contribution to (imagine that) the Clinton Foundation.

According to CNN's Errol Louis and Kate Bolduan, as seen in a discussion Sunday on CNN's Inside Politics, the contents of the Clintons' return make them seem "more middle classy."



Plenty of Republicans have been lamenting their party’s nomination of “the one guy who cannot beat the historically unpopular Hillary Clinton,” but Gary Legum thinks they’re assuming facts not in evidence. In a Friday article, Legum indicated that Hillary would have been a prohibitive favorite against anyone the GOP might have chosen. He opined that the Republicans’ so-called deep bench was a mirage and argued, "For the GOP to nominate someone capable of beating Hillary Clinton in 2016, it would have had to have been a completely different GOP since at least 1992. And if that GOP existed, Clinton would not be a weak and unpopular figure, because she would not have spent 25 years being hit with every ridiculous charge under the sun."



Donald Trump has, to borrow a phrase from Barack Obama, changed the trajectory of the GOP, contended Talking Points Memo editor and publisher Marshall in a Thursday post. “The white ethno-nationalist party which Trump has brought out of the shadows and mobilized,” wrote Marshall, “is now and will continue to be the Republican party…This seems like a transformative event.” Even if “committed Trump supporters” constitute only “10% to 20%” of the party, argued Marshall, it doesn’t matter: “If Trumpism were simply a loud and radical faction within the GOP, there would be some comparable faction opposing it…But there's not. In other words, the size of the Trumpite faction within the GOP (and I'd argue it's quite large) is beside the point because it demonstrably rules the GOP.”



The day before Donald Trump reflected on “Second Amendment people” and their response to Hillary Clinton’s taste in judges, he made news with a speech about economics. To The New Republic’s Brian Beutler, the takeaway there was that Trump had “adopted [both] Paul Ryan’s tax policy and the GOP’s gaffe-centered 2012 campaign strategy of misquoting or misrepresenting the Democratic candidate’s words.” Beutler argued that the two were related since Trump, “vulnerable to criticism from Hillary” on tax issues, has taken the offensive by lying about Clinton’s tax proposals -- specifically, by “claim[ing] that she pledged to raise middle-class taxes."



Night 2 of Democratic Convention coverage: A New York Times reporter referred to the Clintons’ “very rich and complicated relationship,” the “historic” card was played nonstop, and the editorial page owes Mitt Romney an apology on Russia. The reporters weren’t particularly thrilled with Bill Clinton’s speech, but one reporter still found a euphemism for Bill Clinton's personal sex scandals, finding the Clintons' marriage a "rich and complicated relationship."



As Republican National Committee Chairman Reince Priebus appeared as a guest on Sunday's Meet the Press, host Chuck Todd pressed him on the GOP platform, at one point fretting about the plank that makes a statement in favor of each child having both a father and a mother to raise them. The NBC host worried that the plank was "implying that somehow children of same-sex couples are more likely to be addicts, to engage in crime."



Here's a safe prediction about this week's Republican National Convention: TV reporters will paint the GOP as too conservative, hostile to women, anathema to blacks, and an all-around turn-off to voters. And that's not just because the ever-controversial Donald Trump is set to be nominated as the party's presidential candidate. Going back to the 1988 convention, the MRC has documented how reporters act like Democratic surrogates, lecturing Republican officials and delegates about how they are too far to the right and intolerant.



The TV networks are heavily promoting the word “historic” in Hillary Clinton’s presumptive-nominee status – and “historic” is correct. This surely is a first.  “Historic” can be a factual adjective, but in the hands of the networks, it often carries a highly positive ring, often attached to liberal victories. By contrast, consider the historic nature of Mitt Romney’s nomination in 2012. On May 29 of that year, Washington Post reporters Sandhya Somashekar and Jason Horowitz reported Romney was the first Mormon major-party nominee.

How did the networks cover that? Most didn't. ABC, CBS, NBC, PBS, MSNBC, and Fox didn't report it. CNN was the TV exception.



On Wednesday's CNN Newsroom, during a discussion of Donald Trump accusing Hillary Clinton of playing the "gender card," host Brooke Baldwin declared that the comment reminded her of Mitt Romney using the words "binders full of women" which she asserted "really hurt him" in the 2012 presidential campaign.

CNN's Nia-Malika Henderson went on to complain, "We often think of women as only having gender. Men have a gender, too," and, after accusing Trump of playing a "gender card" by acting like an "alpha male," she concluded that "men certainly benefit from the gender card, too, and in some ways benefit more because it's more subtle in some ways for men."



According to Dylan Matthews, Donald Trump attracts a highly diverse group of foes. Some of them (mostly Democrats and independents) find racism appalling, but others (notably some prominent Republicans) are fine with it as long as it’s packaged in a certain way.

In a Wednesday article, Matthews remarked that even though GOPers such as Jeb Bush and Mitt Romney have sharply criticized Trump, they’re “lining up behind a candidate who [also] relies on white supremacist sentiment and fear to drive his support. His name just happens to be Ted Cruz.” Therefore, concluded Matthews, “the Republican #NeverTrump movement has basically nothing to do with sincere concern about Trump's racism. If it did, that would also rule Cruz out of contention.”



Well that didn’t take long. After Cruz’s strong comments condemning Islamic terrorism Tuesday, the media seemed to be following the same teleprompter in making endless comparisons to Trump. ABC’s Jimmy Kimmel Live! also jumped on the bandwagon with a parody ad, narrated by an eerily realistic Mitt Romney impersonator, who claimed Cruz was “almost exactly the same [as Trump] but without the steaks and vodka.”



As CNN Newsroom host Poppy Harlow on Saturday tried to suggest Republicans like John Kasich deserve blame for not speaking out against Donald Trump when he was pushing birtherism against President Barack Obama several years ago, she was taken aback when her guest, Ohio GOP chairman Matt Borges, turned the tables by implicating Hillary Clinton's 2008 presidential campaign in dabbling in similar mischief against her then-opponent Senator Obama.