ABC, NBC and CBS ignored the Republican wins in last night’s primary election races and didn’t update viewers on the finalized results from last Tuesday’s race in Kansas either. After spending last week hyping Democrat candidates and criticizing Trump picks as extremists who had no chance of winning, the networks had to eat their words this morning as Trump picks in several states won their primaries last night.

 


The race for the Republican nomination for Kansas governor is almost as close as close could be with just 91 votes separating frontrunner Kris Kobach, the current secretary of state, and incumbent governor Jeff Colyer. In an appearance on CNN’s Cuomo Prime Time, Kobach was badgered with questions by the show’s namesake that suggested he was possibly involved with manipulating the recount.



This morning, the big three networks downplayed President Trump’s influence on some big state primary elections happening tonight and instead hoped for a massive “blue wave” to sweep across the nation. ABC’s coverage was the most biased, with correspondent Jonathan Karl gushing that the competition in one state was a “major sign of trouble for Republicans” and a “sure sign” that Democrats had the upper hand.



On Friday's MSNBC Live, hosts Stephanie Ruhle and Ali Velshi had a contentious debate with Kansas Secretary of State Kris Kobach over the issue of the Obama administration's DACA program that protects from deportation illegal immigrants who entered the country as children.



Liberal media outlets have now fully entered tin foil hat mode en masse, but none so more as the failing New Republic. And leading this merry band of lunatics is it’s Editor-at-Large Bob Moser, who today penned an article titled ‘Donald Trump, Neo-Nazi Recruiter-in-Chief’.



On CNN's New Day Wednesday morning, co-host Chris Cuomo claimed that serious allegations of voter fraud are "B.S.": "Is there a second line to this story in terms of what this commission is about other than the obvious, which is trying to put meat on the bones of a B.S. allegation."



Monday’s New York Times used a new White House office to go after a conservative who represents two of the things it most loathes: limits on immigration and crackdowns on vote fraud. Both trends are encapsulated in the person of Kansas Secretary of State Kris Kobach. Reporters Michael Wines and Julie Bosman penned: “A ‘Passionate’ Seeker of Voter Fraud in Kansas Gets a National Soapbox.”



MSNBC’s Joy Reid, who was swift to condemn Republican concerns of voter fraud, was equally as fast at accusing them of plotting to steal the election. Reid’s concern centered on a computer system called CrossCheck which was developed to find duplicate names on the voter rolls so they can be removed. But Reid and her guest Rolling Stone writer Greg Palast, who brought the issue to her attention, accuse the system of targeting minorities. “The system disproportionality targets voters of color who are likely to have common surnames, like Washington or Hernandez,” Reid stated. 



In a Thursday post, Talking Points Memo editor and publisher Josh Marshall previewed the Republican convention. He was especially upset that the first night of the convention reportedly will center on “a new rehashing and re-exploitation of the 2012 terror attack in Benghazi…The Benghazi 'scandal' itself has been a four year running gob of hate and derp sticky enough to grab on to it an almost limitless number of conspiracy theories, bogus hearings and almost all the residue 'stab in the back' revanchism available on the American hard right, which is quite a lot…It is also fundamentally based on a series of lies about what happened almost four years ago.”



Today the U.S. Supreme Court, as the Associated Press's Scott Bauer reported, "turned away a challenge to Wisconsin's voter identification law," meaning that "the state is free to impose the voter ID requirement in future elections." Bauer then focused on the impact of the state's off-year primary elections on April 7.

Bauer's relatively tolerable (for him) report tagged the law as "a political flashpoint since Republican legislators passed it in 2011 and Gov. Scott Walker signed it into law." Meanwhile, demonstrating that he will accept leftists' claims at face value even when they can't possibly make any sense, Richard Wolf at USA Today relayed a ridiculous claim made by the law's opponents (bolds are mine):



An unbylined Associated Press item carried at NPR quotes President Obama as follows about Arizona's recently enacted immigration law-enforcement measure:

ObamaQuoteOnAZimmigrationLaw042910

The president is repeating a blatant falsehood about the Arizona law that has gained instant currency in the establishment press and leftist circles. It has no basis in fact, or in the legislation Grand Canyon State Governor Jan Brewer recently signed.

You don't have to go any further than the 20th line of the law (downloadable at this Constitution Law Prof Blog post) to see that Obama and his fellow critics are wrong:



A short Associated Press item tonight notes that the Organization for American States is not happy with the state of Arizona for passing an immigration law-enforcement measure:

APonOASangerAtAZ042810

I don't expect AP to expand on OAS's statement any time soon, because in the process of doing so they might feel compelled to look at how some of the countries criticizing Arizona handle their own illegal immigrants.