Throughout the day on Monday, on-air personalities on Fox News pointed out that the media did not always have the admiration for Arizona Senator and 2008 Republican Presidential candidate John McCain that they have demonstrated over the past 48 hours in the wake of his passing.



Washington Post correspondent Anne Gearan must think that President Donald Trump is in possession of amazing predictive powers. Trump has been talking about renegotiating a new NAFTA deal since the time when he was a candidate for president and Gearan thinks that the real purpose of that deal was to change the subject from Senator John McCain soon after his passing in 2018. Yes, Gearan actually made this claim about the purpose of the new NAFTA deal on MSNBC's Andrea Mitchell Reports on Monday.



Shows on CNN's afternoon and evening lineup were too busy kicking up dirt over President Trump’s delayed acknowledgment of the late Senator McCain’s legacy to bother discussing the latest mass-shooting. Between 5:00 and 10:00 p.m. Eastern, the liberal cable network spent an absurd 106 minutes on the manufactured scandal, leaving paltry time (four minutes) to cover the deadly shooting in Jacksonville, Florida.



On Monday, the White House sparked controversy after the American flag atop the building was raised from half-staff before the remains of Senator John McCain were even in the Capitol. Also on Monday, the White House struck a brand new trade deal with Mexico that would end yet another theater in the administration’s trade wars and is said to help American businesses and consumers. The former was part of a long-running political feud while the latter affected the lives of millions of Americans. Both ABC and CBS actually spent more time during their evening broadcasts on the feud than the end of a trade war.



On Monday's MTP Daily on MSNBC, during a discussion of the fact that President Donald Trump's approval rating has stayed the same in spite of recent bad news, fill-in host Katy Tur was exasperated as she was clearly cheering for his approval rating to fall, and wondered if there was any reason to be "optimistic" that it would. Longtime MSNBC contributor Jonathan Alter described people as "deluded" who think Trump is doing a good job as President.



As the Media Research Center’s Geoff Dickens explained on Monday, journalists loved the late John McCain, except when he got in their way. That hypocrisy was certainly on display on ABC’s Good Morning America and CBS This Morning. CBS co-host Norah O’Donnell lamented “the end of an era.” George Stephanopoulos cheered: “A giant in American politics.”      



If Americans can see men like Sen. McCain as both hero and villain, then the same standard should apply to women like Stormy Daniels – or so argues one New York Times opinion writer. The New York Times published an opinion piece Aug. 24 that heralded Stormy Daniels as a “Feminist Hero.” In the story and subsequently on MSNBC, CNN and Cosmopolitan columnist Jill Filipovic credited Daniels’ for an “unanticipated feminist turning point” after the president’s former lawyer, Michael Cohen, said he paid Daniels (or Stephanie Clifford) at Trump’s request.



Amid glowing tributes to the life and career of Arizona Senator John McCain on Monday, MSNBC took time to use the Republican lawmaker’s passing to trash his 2008 vice presidential running mate Sarah Palin, labeling McCain’s selection of the then-Alaska governor as his “biggest political mistake.”



Remember folks, Vox gonna Vox. Moments after Arizona Republican Senator John McCain’s death on Saturday night, Vox.com sent out a since-deleted tweet that “[y]ou can draw a straight line from John McCain to Donald Trump — through Sarah Palin” that accompanied a piece by politics editor Laura McGann which, in the original version, couldn’t correctly identify the origin of Palin’s “lipstick” comment.



The New York Times lead editorial Monday was dedicated to Arizona Republican Senator John McCain, who passed away on Saturday: “A Scarred but Happy Warrior.” But the liberal editorial page just couldn’t stay classy for the entire 12 paragraph tribute, lapsing into accusations that McCain’s obituary Robert McFadden mostly managed to avoid: "He had principles, and he had flaws, from time to time betraying those principles -- most grievously in the 2008 presidential campaign....he then allowed his own campaign, and himself, to descend to the same debased level, portraying Mr. Obama as a shadowy, untrustworthy and even unpatriotic figure."



While there have been many respectful tributes to John McCain in the media in the past few days, there was a time when the liberal press weren’t always supportive of the war hero and independent-minded Senator from Arizona —  particularly when he was getting in the way of their progressive agenda. A look back at McCain’s relationship with the press, over the decades, shows it was complicated at best.



In the past couple of days since the passing of former Republican Senator John McCain, several personalities on both CNN and MSNBC have lamented his selection of Sarah Palin as his vice presidential nominee in 2008 as a "mistake," with some suggestions that he helped set up the Republican party to go down the wrong track by doing so.