On Monday's MTP Daily on MSNBC, during a discussion of the fact that President Donald Trump's approval rating has stayed the same in spite of recent bad news, fill-in host Katy Tur was exasperated as she was clearly cheering for his approval rating to fall, and wondered if there was any reason to be "optimistic" that it would. Longtime MSNBC contributor Jonathan Alter described people as "deluded" who think Trump is doing a good job as President.



As the Media Research Center’s Geoff Dickens explained on Monday, journalists loved the late John McCain, except when he got in their way. That hypocrisy was certainly on display on ABC’s Good Morning America and CBS This Morning. CBS co-host Norah O’Donnell lamented “the end of an era.” George Stephanopoulos cheered: “A giant in American politics.”      



If Americans can see men like Sen. McCain as both hero and villain, then the same standard should apply to women like Stormy Daniels – or so argues one New York Times opinion writer. The New York Times published an opinion piece Aug. 24 that heralded Stormy Daniels as a “Feminist Hero.” In the story and subsequently on MSNBC, CNN and Cosmopolitan columnist Jill Filipovic credited Daniels’ for an “unanticipated feminist turning point” after the president’s former lawyer, Michael Cohen, said he paid Daniels (or Stephanie Clifford) at Trump’s request.



Amid glowing tributes to the life and career of Arizona Senator John McCain on Monday, MSNBC took time to use the Republican lawmaker’s passing to trash his 2008 vice presidential running mate Sarah Palin, labeling McCain’s selection of the then-Alaska governor as his “biggest political mistake.”



Remember folks, Vox gonna Vox. Moments after Arizona Republican Senator John McCain’s death on Saturday night, Vox.com sent out a since-deleted tweet that “[y]ou can draw a straight line from John McCain to Donald Trump — through Sarah Palin” that accompanied a piece by politics editor Laura McGann which, in the original version, couldn’t correctly identify the origin of Palin’s “lipstick” comment.



The New York Times lead editorial Monday was dedicated to Arizona Republican Senator John McCain, who passed away on Saturday: “A Scarred but Happy Warrior.” But the liberal editorial page just couldn’t stay classy for the entire 12 paragraph tribute, lapsing into accusations that McCain’s obituary Robert McFadden mostly managed to avoid: "He had principles, and he had flaws, from time to time betraying those principles -- most grievously in the 2008 presidential campaign....he then allowed his own campaign, and himself, to descend to the same debased level, portraying Mr. Obama as a shadowy, untrustworthy and even unpatriotic figure."



While there have been many respectful tributes to John McCain in the media in the past few days, there was a time when the liberal press weren’t always supportive of the war hero and independent-minded Senator from Arizona —  particularly when he was getting in the way of their progressive agenda. A look back at McCain’s relationship with the press, over the decades, shows it was complicated at best.



In the past couple of days since the passing of former Republican Senator John McCain, several personalities on both CNN and MSNBC have lamented his selection of Sarah Palin as his vice presidential nominee in 2008 as a "mistake," with some suggestions that he helped set up the Republican party to go down the wrong track by doing so.



NBC News interrupted their Saturday night programming of America’s Got Talent to bring a somber and respectful look at the life of John McCain. What NBC didn’t account for, however, was what was playing after their special report was over.



Republican Sen. John McCain, a war hero who suffered five-and-a-half years as a prisoner of war in the infamous “Hanoi Hilton” prison camp in Vietnam, and who became an independent, influential senator, has died at 81. The New York Times obituary was broadly admiring. But the Times hasn’t always treated Sen. McCain so respectfully. Look back to the 2008 campaign. Reporters suggestied McCain was too old or even constitutionally ineligible for office, a “warmonger” with “hints of racism,” who may have had an affair with a lobbyist and who spread vicious anti-Obama falsehoods on the campaign trail.



Ever since President Trump nominated U.S. Circuit Judge Brett Kavanaugh on July 9 to fill the seat on the Supreme Court left open by retiring “swing justice” Anthony Kennedy, those on the left and in the media have hammered the pick as everything from “controversial” to “cruelly regressive.” While some swore they’d do anything to prevent the Supreme Count from turning more conservative, Time magazine writer Abigail Simon asserted that Kavanaugh is almost certain to be approved, so liberals and Democrats must adapt to the situation until they regain control of the Senate, whenever that happens.



On Friday afternoon, MSNBC and their AM Joy host Joy Reid released separate statements days after more old blog posts surfaced from Reid’s now-defunct site ReidBlog. They ranged from encouraging readers to watch a 9/11 truther documentary to comparing Republican Senator John McCain (AZ) to the Virginia Tech shooter.