With all the debate taking place regarding the promises made by Republicans in Congress and the White House to “repeal and replace” the Obamacare system, most of the people in the “mainstream media” have tilted their coverage to support liberals who want to keep in place what is also called the Affordable Care Act.


I have experienced defeat in presidential politics many times. Actually, I expect most Americans have. You win some, and you lose some. I first experienced defeat in 1964 when then-Sen. Barry Goldwater went down, though I was not even old enough to vote. I experienced it in 1968. I experienced it again in 1976, when my candidate was Ronald Reagan.


Who better than an ex-Hillary Clinton adviser who worked on the Iran deal to weigh in on the escalating conflict with North Korea? That’s who Charlie Rose turned to on Wednesday’s CBS This Morning. The co-hosts did not press Jake Sullivan on problems or scandals involving the Obama administration’s Iran negotiations. 


People who follow the news from the “mainstream media” are constantly being barraged with poll after poll that claim Donald Trump is constantly hitting new “record lows” in his popularity across the country. Besides the possibility that these pollsters were among those who confidently proclaimed that Democratic candidate Hillary Clinton would trounce Republican Donald Trump in last November’s presidential election, people in the press have avoided reporting on at least one place where the GOP leader is more popular than his Democratic predecessor: the Middle East.


Liberal comedian Chelsea Handler is known for slamming people who disagree with her politics, but she went over the top on Sunday, August 6, when she suggested that it would be “nice 2 have laws here for people who think racism is funny." The host of the Chelsea program on the Netflix pay cable television channel made the remark after she learned that “2 Chinese guys were arrested in Berlin for making nazi salutes.”


Media columnist Jim Rutenberg’s latest New York Times column provided the odd image of a reporter regretting that his colleagues actually covered news, under the neutral headline “Germans Covering Election Await a Trove of Stolen Files.” The Times in 2006 proudly used leaks to cripple anti-terrorist programs put in place by Republican presidents, as well as secret diplomatic cables via the stolen Wikileaks trove. A December 2010 article treated the anti-American oddball Julian Assange and his Wikileaks as a Christmas gift, under the galling title “The Gift of Information.” But publication of the hacked emails from the Democratic National Committee may have hurt Hillary Clinton, so it’s suddenly time to break out the sackcloth and ashes and apologize for actually covering the news.


The Boston Globe celebrated a liberal milestone on Saturday: The 25th anniversary of The Year of the Woman in Congress, driven by Anita Hill’s testimony alleging she was sexually harassed by Judge Clarence Thomas. Stephanie Ebbert, who covers “gender issues” for the Globe, posed the question, “25 years after ‘The Year of the Woman,’ what’s changed?” She implied Donald Trump ushered in an era of sexism by defeating Hillary Clinton, and fostered the feminist media myths around Sen. Elizabeth Warren and Sen. Kamala Harris.


This week news broke that Hillary Clinton’s much touted memoir, that’s due for release this Fall, finally had a title: What Happened. Mockery ensued from the right and left over the groan worthy title that showed Clinton still isn’t willing to take any responsibility for losing the election. That notion was met with vehement agreement and disagreement at the table on The View, as hosts Sunny Hostin and Jedediah Bila battled over why Clinton really lost.


During a panel discussion on the Cable News Network on Tuesday, July 25, John Avlon -- editor-in-chief of the liberal Daily Beast website and a CNN political analyst -- claimed that with all the turmoil surrounding GOP President Donald Trump, “the only thing that unites his coalition right now seems to be hatred of Hillary Clinton.”


The front of the New York Times Sunday Review was dominated by a graphic of an Escher-type staircase under the headline “Why Women Aren’t C.E.O.’s -- According to the women who almost were.” If you think you know where the story is going...you’re right. It begins and ends with sour grapes from Susan Chira on how sexism foiled Hillary Clinton’s presidential hopes. The paper spent the general election contest, from debate coverage to the arts pages, suggesting a vote for anyone other than Hillary Clinton was sexism, while showing no concern over the idea of women voting for Hillary solely because she was a woman.


The New York Times shut down their Public Editor position last May, a position established in 2003 in the wake of the mortifying scandal involving reporter Jayson Blair. Andy Robinson talked to all six former Public Editors of the New York Times for the Columbia Journalism Review. Among the questions about anonymous sourcing and testy newsroom relations, Robinson re-surfaced one that conservatives have a ready answer for: “Is the Times a liberal newspaper?”


Pausing briefly from the press's never-ending Trump-Russia obsession, both Politico Magazine and USA Today decided earlier this week to focus on the state of President Donald Trump's health. Nothing tangible appears to have prompted either report. USA Today absurdly issued a "breaking news" alert on the topic.