In an otherwise critical piece about Hillary Clinton’s continued high public profile being a problem for Democrats ahead of the midterms and 2020, Politico’s Annie Karni touted the former Democratic nominee having learned at least one lesson from 2016: she should have been nicer to reporters. Appearing on MSNBC’s Andrea Mitchell Reports Friday afternoon, Karni emphasized how Clinton “understands that now she screwed up her relationship with the press.”



Michelle Cottle, the lead New York Times editorial writer for national politics, issued a surprising signed lead editorial in Thursday’s edition, “Hillary Clinton’s Master Class in Distraction” (perhaps a quasi-lead editorial, as it carries the paper’s “Editorial Observer” tag, but it is in the regular editorial slot). Cottle actually mentioned respectfully the case of Juanita Broaddick, who credibly accused  then-Arkansas attorney general Bill Clinton of raping her in a hotel room in 1978.



The female co-hosts of ABC’s The View are certainly no strangers to controversy, but on Thursday, the panelists turned their attention from mostly liberal topics to criticizing Twitter for allowing numerous harsh posts to remain on the social network website. The discussion took a deeply personal tone when conservative co-host Meghan McCain described what she went through when a doctored photo invaded her grief after her father -- Arizona Senator John McCain -- passed away in late August.



Democratic socialist Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez, seeking to represent New York's 14th Congressional District, has called for the abolition of the Electoral College. Her argument came on the heels of the Senate's confirming Brett Kavanaugh to the Supreme Court. She was lamenting the fact that Chief Justice John Roberts and Justice Samuel Alito, nominated by George W. Bush, and Justices Neil Gorsuch and Kavanaugh, nominated by Donald Trump, were court appointments made by presidents who lost the popular vote but won the Electoral College vote.



The journalists at CBS This Morning on Monday want you to know that Hillary Clinton is “so much more” than the '90s accusations against her husband. In a segment that touted “Clinton’s candor,” reporter Tony Dokoupil admitted the “complicated position” Mrs. Clinton faces with the Me Too Movement. 



Reacting to Hillary Clinton’s Sunday interview with CBS News in which she defended her husband Bill Clinton’s mistreatment of women, on Monday, NBC anchor Megyn Kelly and her panel of guests slammed the former First Lady for her hypocrisy and “many lies” in the #MeToo era. Kelly also blasted liberal feminist groups that rushed to former President Clinton’s defense in the 1990s.



Reporter Matt Flegenheimer prodded the Democratic party to abandno a moral high ground he is deluded into thinking the party currently holds, in “Democrats Debate if High Road in Politics Is Leading Anywhere – Party of ‘We Go High’ Is Just Getting Angry,” on the front of Saturday’s New York Times. As if the Democrats haven’t been in full angry mode for years, culminating in aggressive protests and actual violence committed against congressional Republicans, and then the anti-Kavanaugh mobs.



Hillary Clinton isn’t president, but Hollywood is offering the biggest consolation prize they have: working her into TV plots where she can be toasted as wise and wonderful. Within the first two weeks of the fall season, CBS has done this twice, on Madam Secretary and the reboot of Murphy Brown. 



During Justice Brett Kavanaugh’s confirmation, the left grew more brazen and would openly proclaim their radical beliefs and tout such tactics. With calls for the abandonment of civility and the apparent encouragement of violence, one would think it deserved some form of critical airtime from the media. But since the broadcast networks (ABC, CBS, and NBC) were in the tank for the Democrats, they didn’t think it was newsworthy Wednesday evening.



CBS’s fictional salute to Hillary Clinton, Madam Secretary, has finally achieved its ultimate dream. After four seasons, the new season premiere features a lofty appearance from the former Secretary of State and failed two-time presidential nominee herself. Even better, she advises our lead on how to handle white nationalist terrorists.



Just when it seemed that Bill and Hillary Clinton had finally left the national stage, along comes a play by a liberal producer that examines an “American dynasty in crisis” about a “power couple who have been a prominent part of the American political landscape for the past quarter-century.” Hillary and Clinton will debut on Broadway next spring and will star actors Laurie Metcalf and John Lithgow in the title roles while exploring potential behind-the-scenes developments of the 2008 Democratic presidential primary in New Hampshire.



One thing is perfectly clear: CBS's reboot of the show Murphy Brown would not have happened if Hillary Clinton had won the 2016 presidential race. While that fact is admitted, it is hard to imagine why this show is needed given the abundance of bashing on network television of President Trump, but still they do their level best to provoke.