On Sunday's edition of Reliable Sources, CNN host Brian Stelter brought on three reporters who broke big stories in the #MeToo movement about sexual harassment and assault by powerful people, especially the accusations against CBS. Unfortunately, when it came to the unproven allegations against Supreme Court Justice Brett Kavanaugh, they could only feel pain for Kavanaugh's "very credible" accusers. No one was invited on CNN to express the view that Kavanaugh's accusers weren't convincing in their tales of teenage debauchery.



New York Times politics editor Patrick Healy led an informal, unprofessional roundtable of the paper's political reporters Matt Flegenheimer, Astead Herndon, and Katie Rogers, who happily passed around liberal stereotypes of conservatives in their year-end wrap-up discussion. Healy joined the list of media elite who just loved Saturday Night Live's anti-Kavanaugh skit: "[Actor Matt] Damon reminded us how Kavanaugh’s aggressive, grievance-driven performance turned the tide for the Republicans against a credible woman, not unlike what Trump’s aggressive, grievance-driven performance did in 2016." Katie Rogers lamented of Trump's rally music: "Elton John is forever ruined for me."



For a year that featured Joy Behar’s anti-Christian tirade on The View, faux conservatives making fools of themselves on cable news, Jim Acosta’s nuttiness, and Samantha Bee’s ugly use of the c-word against First Daughter Ivanka Trump, 2018 provided an inordinate amount of content for the NewsBusters staff. Following the precedent set in 2016 and 2017, the following post gives you, the readers, a look at the top ten posts of 2018 based on traffic.



It’s that time of the year as seemingly every news organization offers reflections on the top stories of 2018. But no year-in-review compilation would be sufficient for a site like this one without a post dedicated to the buffoonery offered to the masses by MSNBC’s Hardball host Chris Matthews. Following previous wrap-ups at the end of 2016 and 2017, 2018 offered dozens of possible nominees. 



Vanity Fair is still investigating Kavanaugh. Evgenia Peretz, Vanity Fair contributing editor, posted a long expose of Kavanaugh’s alma mater: “‘Men for Others, My Ass’: After Kavanaugh, Inside Georgetown Prep’s Culture of Omertà.” Through guilt by association, she tried to imply the school’s code of silence was concealing something foul in Kavanaugh’s past (which she offers zero evidence for) and tied Kavanaugh to a shameful incident that happened at the school two decades after he graduated. The story began with fuzzily sourced observations from Georgetown Prep’s class of ’83 Homecoming this October, featuring cameos from the now-notorious crew from the senior yearbook.



As the end of 2018 draws near, several companies and websites that provide dictionaries are using the occasion to declare their choices for “Word of the Year.” When announcing Merriam-Webster’s selection on Monday, Time listed a number of negative events that took place over the past 12 months as why the dictionary company chose “justice” as its pick for 2018.



The ascension of Justice Brett Kavanaugh and his “angry” supporters still looms large in the liberal psyche, as shown in two otherwise unrelated articles in the January/February 2019 issue of the Atlantic magazine. Contributing editor Peter Beinart saw “The Global Backlash Against Women,” an extremely strained attempt to link international extremists with a feminist backlash. There was also a Kavanaugh link shoehorned into Charles Duhigg’s cover story on political anger: "Witness the confirmation hearings of Supreme Court Justice Brett Kavanaugh, in which the nominee and his Republican backers in the Senate denounced the proceedings in red-faced diatribes."



On Monday morning, Time Magazine released its top ten “shortlist” ahead of the Tuesday reveal for its annual “Person of the Year” issue and many of the nominees came as no surprise. Whether it was the March for Our Lives students or Dr. Christine Blasey Ford, it was a liberal list made in heaven.



New York Times’ Susan Chira, a “senior correspondent and editor on gender issues,” interviewed Anita Hill for some reason for Friday’s paper, “Hill Reflects: ‘Clearly the Tide Has Not Turned.’” Hill is seen by the press as a victim of both Clarence Thomas and the all-white, all-male Senate Judiciary Committee who brutally questioned her and has achieved secular sainthood, so there are never any inconvenient questions. Interviewing and citing Hill in the aftermath of sexual allegations against Republicans is a regular thing at the paper now. This one is keyed to the accusations hurled against now-Judge Brett Kavanaugh, whom the paper promises “we’re still investigating.”



GQ's Jeanne Marie Laskas has declared Serena Williams ''Champion of the Year," basing the honor on a loss and an epic meltdown by Williams at the 2018 U.S. Open finals in September. In arguing that women are held to a higher standard for expressing anger, Williams' outburst is defended because she was robbed by a "stupid skinny white-boy," while Supreme Court nominee Brett Kavanaugh's fiery September defense against charges of sexual misconduct is characterized as a "hissy fit."



Appearing on NBC’s Today show, Top Chef host Padma Lakshmi bemoaned the “tumultuous” Trump presidency and slammed the administration’s immigration policy, accusing the Border Patrol of “tear-gassing children.” She also discussed the September New York Times op-ed she wrote attacking then-Supreme Court nominee Brett Kavanaugh.



We are about to find out whether Democrats meant it when they lamented the loss of civility in Washington. Having won the majority in the House of Representatives in Tuesday's election, will they cooperate with Republicans and "reach across the aisle," or will they pander to their base, which wants President Trump's blood? Guess which scenario I'm betting on Rep. Maxine Waters (D-CA), who will likely head the Financial Services Committee, has promised to seek revenge on the banks, which she notes loaned money to people in the '90s so they could buy houses they couldn't afford.