On his MSNBC show, Hardball, Chris Matthews suggests that it would be a "witch hunt . .  . to impeach a President for his sexual misconduct, even if it is illegal."



On Thursday, it took CNN roughly six minutes and 34 seconds from the conclusion of former President George H. W. Bush’s funeral before CNN’s cast of analysts and journalists started attacking President Trump and, despite claiming otherwise, making the genuine and heartfelt tributes to a man of character and honor all about the current President’s supposed lack thereof.



New York Times writer Amanda Hess issued surprise criticism of the media’s coverage of Bill Clinton’s sex scandals in her review of The Clinton Affair, A&E’s six-part mini-series on Bill Clinton’s scandal over White House intern Monica Lewinsky. Hess argued that the women who accused the former president of sexual harassment were unjustly mocked and shunned by the mainstream press: “Paula Jones Re-emerges In New Light – A time to listen to the women of the Bill Clinton scandals.” It’s sound advice from Hess, but 20 years too late for the partisan New York Times, which dismissed Juanita Broaddrick’s credible allegations of rape against Clinton as “toxic waste.



During Monday’s Ingraham Angle, host Laura Ingraham and her panel discussed CNN political analyst Kirsten Powers’s characterization of white women who voted for President Trump as racists who benefit from the patriarchy. Ingraham opened the segment by playing a clip of Powers from three years ago, back when she was a Fox News contributor and promoting her book, The Silencing: How The Left is Killing Free Speech.



On Sunday night’s miniseries The Clinton Affair, A&E took potshots at conservatives in their attempt to create a sympathetic portrayal of Bill and Hillary Clinton. While praising Clinton as a feminist president, the network gave soundbites to Democrats attacking anyone on the right who dared to criticize the political couple for their numerous scandals.



During Tuesday evening's edition of his prime-time show, Fox News Channel host Sean Hannity spent almost nine minutes hammering CNN correspondent Jim Acosta, who was “desperately trying to get back into the White House” after his “hard pass” was taken away last week. That action led the cable network to file a lawsuit against President Donald Trump and other high-ranking Republican officials.



Michelle Cottle, the lead New York Times editorial writer for national politics, issued a surprising signed lead editorial in Thursday’s edition, “Hillary Clinton’s Master Class in Distraction” (perhaps a quasi-lead editorial, as it carries the paper’s “Editorial Observer” tag, but it is in the regular editorial slot). Cottle actually mentioned respectfully the case of Juanita Broaddick, who credibly accused  then-Arkansas attorney general Bill Clinton of raping her in a hotel room in 1978.



The journalists at CBS This Morning on Monday want you to know that Hillary Clinton is “so much more” than the '90s accusations against her husband. In a segment that touted “Clinton’s candor,” reporter Tony Dokoupil admitted the “complicated position” Mrs. Clinton faces with the Me Too Movement. 



Just imagine if there was video of Brett Kavanaugh groping a flight attendant – the footage would be all over the network and cable news shows right now. But when footage of President Bill Clinton grabbing a flight attendant’s knee was revealed, it was only a small part of a 1998 ABC World News Tonight segment that praised then Clinton aide/confidante Bruce Lindsey.



Almost 18 years after former Democratic President Bill Clinton left office, liberal actress and activist Alyssa Milano finally admitted on Thursday's Cuomo Prime Time that sexual assault charges against him should have been taken more seriously, although both she and CNN host Chris Cuomo avoided words like "rape" or "sexual assault" in referring to the accusations.



Just when it seemed that Bill and Hillary Clinton had finally left the national stage, along comes a play by a liberal producer that examines an “American dynasty in crisis” about a “power couple who have been a prominent part of the American political landscape for the past quarter-century.” Hillary and Clinton will debut on Broadway next spring and will star actors Laurie Metcalf and John Lithgow in the title roles while exploring potential behind-the-scenes developments of the 2008 Democratic presidential primary in New Hampshire.



During the past three weeks, Supreme Court nominee Brett Kavanaugh has received a deluge of news coverage accusing him of vile crimes, including attempted rape and even organizing gang rapes. While these charges did not originate with the news media, the lack of satisfactory corroborating evidence should have caused ethical reporters to refrain from gratuitously repeating allegations that painted Kavanaugh in a monstrous light. But this is not what happened.