Liberals have long believed in the motto: “Do as I say, not as I do.” The latest example of that philosophy took place on Sunday, when rising Democratic socialist Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez used the occasion of a campaign “listening tour” to prevent members of the media from attending the event, which was otherwise open to the public.



It’s sad when the liberal comedian on your network is tougher than most of the journalists. But that’s what happened on Tuesday night and Wednesday morning as socialist Bernie Sanders made two network appearances. Late Night host Stephen Colbert repeatedly pressed Sanders on the problems with promoting socialism in America. Over on CBS This Morning, the efforts were half-hearted at best. 



During the Wednesday night edition of CNN’s Cuomo PrimeTime, host Chris Cuomo joined the ranks of many other liberals who have interviewed far-left heartthrob Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez, the self-avowed socialist who upset incumbent Joe Crowley during the Democratic primary in New York on June 26. However, the CNN anchor behaved far differently than those other people when he asked how she would “pay" for any new programs because of the “sticker shock” additional health care might create.



As the November 6 midterm election draws ever nearer, the people at the liberal Time magazine continue their efforts to help the Democratic Party recapture both the Senate and the U. S. House of Representatives. Part of that "sunny future" is Ohio Rep. Tim Ryan not only winning re-election, but also leaping to a post in the leadership of the Democratic Congressional Caucus.



Poverty is no mystery, and it's easily avoidable. The poverty line that the Census Bureau used in 2016 for a single person was an income of $12,486 that year. For a two-person household, it was $16,072, and for a four-person household, it was $24,755. To beat those poverty thresholds is fairly simple. Here's the road map: Complete high school; get a job, any kind of a job; get married before having children; and be a law-abiding citizen.



For the current generation, sometimes referred to as millennials, it appears one thing is more seductive than sex -- and that's socialism.Sen. Bernie Sanders (I-VT) and 28-year-old Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez, winner of a New York Democratic primary, are the old and new faces of socialist America. Their platforms, it appears, hinge on the concept of shared wealth, in other words, handing out free stuff to just about everyone.



The Associated Press on Saturday reported a story headlined "Democratic socialism surging in the age of Trump."  Reporter Steve Peoples began with Zak Ringelstein, a Democrat running for the U.S. Senate in Maine against Sen. Angus King, a CNN favorite and an independent who caucuses with the Democrats.



In the wake of Justice Anthony Kennedy’s retirement announcement on Wednesday, and realization that President Trump would get a second conservative nomination, the liberals were torn between organizing a feeble resistance and eating their own. This was obvious in the massive flare up on CNN Tonight where host Don Lemon and Democratic strategist Symone Sanders blow up at each other over who was to blame for allowing Republicans to get control of the White House.



Several recent polls, plus the popularity of Sen. Bernie Sanders, demonstrate that young people prefer socialism to free market capitalism. That, I believe, is a result of their ignorance and indoctrination during their school years, from kindergarten through college. For the most part, neither they nor many of their teachers and professors know what free market capitalism is.



Note well these three items from the week’s news. 1. The Guardian and the Los Angeles Times investigate the private real estate holdings of Fox and talk radio host Sean Hannity. 2.   New York magazine reporter Olivia Nuzzi was writing a piece on ex-Trump White House aide Hope Hicks



During Monday evening’s edition of MSNBC’s 11th Hour with Brian Williams, the disgraced former NBC anchorman asked New York Times political reporter and author Amy Chozick if “all the signs” of Hillary’s impending defeat in November of 2016 were obvious to reporters.



Amy Chozick, who covered the Hillary Clinton campaign for the New York Times, sports sackcloth and ashes for the sin of actually reporting on publicly available emails from the Clinton campaign -- while ignoring all the dirty details in the emails themselves: "But it wasn’t a scoop. It was more like a bank heist....I didn’t push to hold off on publishing them until we could have a less harried discussion. I didn’t raise the possibility that we’d become puppets in Vladimir Putin’s master plan."