Joy Behar, the unabashed Obama-lover, took some cheap shots at Sen. Marco Rubio (R-Fl.) Monday.

Shortly after his appearance on ABC's The View, Behar sent a Twitter message to her followers mocking the Senator as a "religious flip-flopper":



NBC News political director Chuck Todd said Monday the Supreme Court's ruling regarding Arizona's anti-illegal immigration law "is probably the worst of all outcomes if you’re Mitt Romney."

Such was said on MSNBC's Jansing and Company moments after the announcement (video follows with transcript and commentary):



Conservative author Glenn Beck on Sunday took to Twitter to blast New York Times columnist David Brooks for comments he made last year about the talk radio host's predictions concerning Egypt without President Hosni Mubarak.

On PBS's Newshour last February, syndicated columnist Mark Shields mentioned Beck in a discussion about how people attending the CPAC convention viewed the goings-on in Egypt from a domestic political perspective (transcript via LexisNexis):



As NewsBusters reported Monday, NBC’s Andrea Mitchell, on the MSNBC program bearing her name, aired a video of presumptive Republican presidential nominee Mitt Romney selectively edited in a fashion designed to make him look like an out of touch imbecile.

On CNN's Reliable Sources Sunday, host Howard Kurtz scolded Mitchell for expressing "no regret" for airing the clip (video follows with transcript and commentary):



Do you think trying to balance the federal budget is incendiary?

NBC's David Gregory apparently does, for on Sunday's Meet the Press, he asked Congressman Darrell Issa (R-Calif.) "whether a guy like Paul Ryan is a little too incendiary" to be vice president (video follows with transcript and commentary):



Wall Street Journal columnist Peggy Noonan said Sunday that if Rob Portman were Republican presidential candidate Mitt Romney's running mate, he "just might eviscerate" Joe Biden in a vice presidential debate.

Appearing on ABC's This Week, Noonan added, "I think that might lead to a certain sense, this growing meme out there of the administration as a house of cards. There's something not fully stable, not fully operating, not fully right about this thing" (video follows with transcript and commentary).



CNN political contributor Hilary Rosen got a much-needed education about voter ID laws from George Will on ABC's This Week Sunday.

When Rosen echoed the dishonest Democrat talking point that voter ID laws are considered "under the civil rights statutes" to be voter suppression, Will smartly replied, "Let the record show that the Supreme Court, with Justice John Paul Stevens, liberal Justice writing it, said that there is no Constitutional flaw in photo ID voter laws" (video follows with transcript and commentary):



Appearing as a panel member on this weekend's syndicated Chris Matthews Show, MSNBC's Howard Fineman - also of the Huffington Post - described President Obama as having a "superhero's challenge" in Washington in having to deal with "a different planet than the one he originally was on."

A bit earlier, Fineman had recounted that President Obama was "confused" when he came to Washington and found that conservatives were not willing to work with him. Fineman:



This one of the most obvious "if the shoe were on the other foot" items I've seen in some time.

If a Republican or conservative presidential candidate's campaign ever dared to suggest that supporters register their wedding, graduation, or other event so they could then ask friends and family to make donations to the candidate's election efforts in lieu of a gift, the ridicule wouldn't stop for the next year -- and, I should add, deservedly so. But the Obama Event Registry (Obama-Biden blog post here; HT Weasel Zippers), which has been out there for about 48 hours, has barely made an establishment press ripple. What follows is a graphic from the blog post, followed by its first four outraged comments, showing that the idea is not getting a warm, uh, reception.



On Thursday, at the Washington Examiner, Byron York concentrated on Obama's clear antipathy towards business as described in David Maraniss's recent book about President Obama (Barack Obama: The Story) relating to Dear Leader's brief stint at a company called Business International.

Though that's obviously a critical point to make during the 2012 campaign, a more foundational one is that this mindset, as well as most of Obama's stream of "embellishments" (most people would call them "lies") about his time at BI, were known or knowable well before the Illinois senator decided to run for president in early 2007 -- even the one that has the folks at Michelle Malkin's Twitchy.com all atwitter, namely that Obama didn't, as he claimed, have a secretary.



MSNBC's supposedly most intelligent "news" anchor almost had a total meltdown on HBO's Real Time Friday.

When repeatedly asked by host Bill Maher and guest Nick Gillespie for her opinion of  Massachusetts' healthcare program, Maddow whined like a little girl, "Leave me alone about RomneyCare, all of you" (video follows with transcript and commentary):



A common media deception is to accuse Republicans of being anti-immigration.

When Newsweek's Eleanor Clift tried this on PBS's McLaughlin Group Friday, US News & World Report's James Pethokoukis quickly scolded, "They’re anti-illegal immigration. They’re not anti-immigration...That’s just wrong" (video follows with transcribed highlights and commentary):