NPR Morning Edition anchor Steve Inskeep was granted another interview with President Obama just before he left on another Martha’s Vineyard vacation, and the first story aired on Tuesday's Morning Edition, with a second on Tuesday night’s All Things Considered. The subject was limited to the Iran deal.

Despite the strange notion held by many liberals that NPR is a voice for civility in media and politics, Inskeep failed to ask the president about his controversial recent remarks in a speech at American University that “It’s those hardliners chanting ‘Death to America’ who have been most opposed to the deal. They're making common cause with the Republican Caucus.”



As of Friday evening, ABC, CBS, and NBC's morning and evening newscasts have yet to report on the targeting of Asian-owned businesses by the rioters/looters in Baltimore on Monday. To their credit, CNN and NPR covered this disturbing component of the unrest in Maryland's largest city. Less than 24 hours after the unrest, on Tuesday's The Lead with Jake Tapper, CNN's Joe Johns spotlighted how an "Asian-owned liquor store" fell prey to looters, but a nearby hardware store was spared after "guys in the community" intervened.



NPR Morning Edition anchor Steve Inskeep interviewed presidential candidate Marco Rubio for Tuesday’s program,and like Jake Tapper on his CNN show Tuesday, threw hardballs at Rubio for being in the wrong side of the polls on gay marriage. (Recent polls are showing about 60 percent in favor, 35 percent opposed).

But Inskeep demonstrated a liberal swagger by suggesting social conservatives no longer had a leg to stand on:



There wasn’t a lot of fact-checking of Obama’s State of the Union address, but NPR promised they would be eyeing the factual claims. In a ten-minute segment on Wednesday's Morning Edition, they investigated claims they insisted what Obama said was “true,” if a matter of political dispute.

But in "fact-checking" Sen. Joni Ernst's GOP response, NPR's Scott Horsley played a slippery game with the estimates of jobs created by the Keystone pipeline proposal.



In the fall of 2007, President Bush offered an interview on race relations to National Public Radio correspondent Juan Williams, but NPR declined the invitation. Ellen Weiss, the news boss at the time (who was deposed in the controversy after she fired Williams three years later), demanded that an NPR anchor do the interview. The Williams interview with the president aired on Fox News, and not on NPR.

That sense of feisty independence does not extend to President Obama. When he grants an interview to an NPR anchor, it has all the dramatic tension and hostility of a cappuccino klatch with the D.C. Young Democrats.



President Obama sat down with Steve Inskeep, host of NPR’s Morning Edition, for an interview that aired on Monday, December 29 and was repeatedly tossed softball questions from the lefty reporter throughout their conversation. Inskeep began the discussion by asking President Obama “Since your party's defeat in the election, you have made two major executive actions — one on immigration, one on Cuba...Is there some way in which that election just passed has liberated you?” 



On December 11, the continuing resolution currently funding the federal government will expire and that seemed like the perfect opportunity for the folks at National Public Radio to speculate about a possible GOP-caused government shutdown. Appearing on NPR’s Morning Edition on Monday, December 1, Steve Inskeep and Cokie Roberts went to great lengths discussing how the Republican Party could shut down the federal government. Even though Roberts conceded that a shutdown was unlikely, the NPR correspondent did her best to repeatedly play up how the GOP wants to “to keep the option open all the time.” 



Count NPR as one of those national media outlets that just can’t really grasp the notion that the St. Louis Post-Dispatch and The Washington Post have ruined the narrative that “gentle giant” Michael Brown never wrestled police officer Darren Wilson for his gun. The finding of burns on the thumb “supports the fact that this guy is reaching for the gun, if he has gunpowder particulate material in the wound.” But NPR blurred over the inconvienent news.



The very same National Public Radio that highlighted the fringy "extremism" of the 1964 Republican convention on Thursday night spent Thursday morning boosting the idea of a socialist President of the United States. Their online headline was "Could a Socialist Senator Become a National Brand?"

Morning Edition anchor Steve Inskeep introduced a promotional story on Sen. Bernie Sanders of Vermont by noting "this socialist barely got two percent of the vote when he first ran for office in the 1970s. Now he's thinking of running for president." Reporter Ailsa Chang boosted the mainstream appeal of Sanders-style socialism:



On NPR’s Morning Edition, anchor Steve Inskeep announced “It's Friday morning, which is when we hear from StoryCorps, which is marking the anniversary of a pivotal moment for gay rights -- the 1969 Stonewall riots – 45 years ago tomorrow, gay protesters clashed with police in New York. Now StoryCorps is launching an initiative to preserve the stories of LGBT people, which is called OutLoud.”

Inskeep turned to the testimony of a seventy-year old homosexual named Patrick Haggerty, who told a story about how he went to high school in rural Washington state with glitter on his face, and his father came to school in dirty farmer clothes. The father was hailed by the son: “I had the patron saint of dads for sissies.”



Carrie Johnson's Monday report on NPR's Morning Edition could have been mistaken as an informercial for the left-of-center ACLU and the NAACP's efforts to help "protect minority voting rights," after the Supreme Court's Shelby County v. Holder decision from June 2013. Johnson played up how "a divided Supreme Court gutted part of that law – throwing into chaos a system that had required...states to ask for federal permission before making election changes."

All but one of the correspondent's talking heads during the segment were liberal activists who lamented the Court's decision, but she failed to point out their political ideology or that of the groups they represent. Johnson also singled out one attendee of the organizations' "training session," who attacked the Obama administration from the left:



NPR's resident ObamaCare booster, Julie Rovner, lionized outgoing liberal Congressman Henry Waxman on Friday's Morning Edition. Rovner trumpeted how "during his 40 years in the House, he focused on passing legislation – lots of legislation – the Clean Air Act, the Clean Water Act, the Orphan Drug Act, nutrition labels, food safety, and the Affordable Care Act. Waxman played a major role in all of them."

The correspondent left out any conservative/Republican criticism of the California representative, and let a fellow Democratic member of Congress and two liberal talking heads laud the retiring politician, with one heralding him as the Ted Kennedy of the House. She did include two clips from Orrin Hatch, but the Utah Republican senator heaped praise on Rep. Waxman. Rovner also gave the congressman a chance to take a parting shot at the Tea Party-friendly caucus in Congress: