"The highest patriotism is not a blind acceptance of official policy, but a love of one's country deep enough to call her to a higher plain." -- Sen. George McGovern (D-SD) Filmmakers Ken Burns and Lynn Novick have performed a vital public service in making their documentary "The Vietnam War" for PBS. Given the division that war caused in America, it is a pretty fair chronicling of the way things were half a century ago. The film brought back a lot of mostly bad memories to people of my generation.



Since Donald Trump began his run for President in June 2015, parts of the dominant liberal media have repeatedly parroted the incorrect claim that, in 1989, Trump ran a newspaper ad in which he urged the execution of a group of young black and Hispanic teens who ended up eventually being proven "innocent" in spite of confessing to the infamous rape and beating of a Central Park jogger that year.

 



On Friday's Morning Joe, Katty Kay, English anchor for BBC World News America, came to the baffling conclusion that Vietnam is “a temple of capitalism and commitment to all of the things that Americans hold dear,” and documentary filmmaker Ken Burns seemed to agree.



Ken Burns has finally emerged following Donald Trump's election victory. It took over a month for that to happen since as Burns described, he "needed some time in the fetal position." Well now that the shock is starting to wear off, an interesting phenomenon has taken place which was noted by Dilbert cartoon creator, Scott Adams: the rapid evaporation of hallucinations of Trump as Hitler held by Burns and others. 



Alex Griswold at Mediaite pointed out that star PBS filmmaker Ken Burns is out on cable television ranting the liberal line again. The program was Amanpour on CNN International after the debate on Thursday. Christiane Amanpour, his fellow Obama enthusiast, was interviewing him about his latest PBS documentary on saving Jews from the Nazis, which they both naturally thought offered Republican parallels.



Ken Burns still can't get over his obsession over Donald Trump. Last June, in his Stanford commencement speech, the documentary filmmaker with the outdated Beatle haircut went all drama queen over the candidacy of Donald Trump. Well, he still can't get Trump out of his mind even if he is unable to speak his name.

In an interview with Carl Quintanilla, host of CNBC's BINGE, Burns takes us on a troubled trip deep into the heart of liberal darkness. His obsession is mostly amusing but he still continues to pretend that he is "nonpartisan" which is an easily disprovable lie. The interview begins with the clip of Burns' Stanford campaign speech thinly disguised as a commencement address:



Appearing on Thursday’s CBS This Morning, liberal PBS filmmaker Ken Burns absurdly argued: “I’ve spent my entire professional life being straight down the middle, non-partisan. Just trying to tell American facts. I try, in public television, to reach all audiences.” He made that declaration despite being on the show to promote his anti-Donald Trump crusade in the 2016 campaign.



If Donald Trump wins the presidency this November it appears documentary filmmaker Ken Burns might need to be fitted out for a straitjacket. If you have any doubt of this, then take a look below at the unhinged rant Burns performed during his commencement speech at Stanford University yesterday. Rather than ditching outright partisanship for the day out of respect for the victims of the tragic terrorist attack in Orlando, Burns decided to stick with his prepared speech to declare his crazed obsession about Trump. The self-proclaimed "yellow dog Democrat" just couldn't give politics a rest yesterday of all days. The speech was also especially egregious in view of the fact that Burns is largely dependent on taxpayer based funding from PBS and he just insulted at least half the people paying for his career. Here is Burns, looking at times like he is about to leap out of his thin skin, as he delivers a political campaign speech disguised as commencement address:



“Like the amputated limb felt long after it has been cut off, I miss Trayvon Martin,” the famous orator said. Who would utter such an elaborate expression of white guilt? Try star PBS filmmaker Ken Burns, gushing his way through a government-funded honor: the “Jefferson Lecture,” the “nation’s highest honor for intellectual achievement” awarded by Obama’s National Endowment for the Humanities.

One certainly hopes Mr. Burns will assuage his amputation-level grief by sending the entirety of the NEH’s $10,000 cash prize for this lecture to Trayvon’s mother.



“Today, there’s nothing new under the sun,” intoned Ken Burns as he lamented the persistence of racial inequality in the United States in a commencement address at Washington University in St. Louis. So reported USA Today College.

Burns went on a post-Ferguson rant about racism. "The shame continues: prison populations exploding with young black men, young black men killed almost weekly by policemen, whole communities of color burdened by corrupt municipalities that resemble more the predatory company store of a supposedly bygone era than a responsible local government."



Just how liberal is fake conservative Stephen Colbert? Politico’s Hadas Gold reports the Democrats are raising money off his retirement from Comedy Central.

The Democratic Congressional Campaign Committee is asking people to sign a 'Thank you' card. "After nine great years, the Colbert Report is going off the air," the email reads. "Thank you Stephen Colbert for an amazing ride!"



In an interview with Ken Burns on Sunday's web-based Meet the Press feature Press Pass, moderator Chuck Todd asked the historian and film-maker about his PBS documentary on the Roosevelts: "It's amazing what the press didn't cover....I mean, and if they had, obviously it could have changed history." Burns responded:

It could. But I think we focus too much – we presume that because there was a gentleman's agreement to turn off the cameras as he [FDR] started to stand up or when he started to sit down, that we know less...."Wasn't that quaint an arrangement? They sort of looked the other way when JFK did that or they, you know, didn't really notice Franklin Roosevelt's illness." They actually did and they actually knew more and had better and more intimate access to power, and that's an important thing. [Listen to the audio]