At the Associated Press Sunday evening, White House Correspondent Julie Pace's coverage of President Obama's Oval Office address was predictably weak.

One could cite at least a half-dozen problems with Pace's story, but two of them were particularly disingenuous.



The obvious pull quote of the day from President Obama's contentious press conference in Antalya, Turkey is this statement: "What I’m not interested in doing is posing or pursuing some notion of American leadership or America winning or whatever other slogans they come up with ..." Obama then claimed that any ideas coming from those who believe in such a notion have "no relationship to what is actually going to work to protect the American people and to protect the people in the region."

Ed Driscoll at PJ Media believes that these words are "the president’s equivalent of Carter’s malaise speech" in the 1970s. Just in case he's right, related stories at the Associated Press and the New York Times have not mentioned Obama's statement, a clear indicator of his lack of genuine resolve, in their coverage.



Talking to the latest Republican to enter the 2016 presidential race, former Virginia Governor Jim Gilmore, on Fox News’s Special Report Thursday, Associated Press White House correspondent Julie Pace worried about the makeup of the GOP field: “If you look at the 17 Republican candidates right now, there's not much diversity in terms of gender and race. What does that say to the American public about diversity in the Republican Party and should that be a priority for the party to diversify?”



Last week, the Center for Medical Progress released a damning undercover video in which a senior official at Planned Parenthood discussed the organization’s practice of manipulating an abortion to salvage baby parts to be sold for medical research, but ABC, CBS, NBC, and CNN all ignored the story during their Sunday morning political talk shows. Fox News Sunday was the only one to cover Planned Parenthood during its broadcast. Instead of covering Planned Parenthood, the four shows spent more than 50 minutes on Donald Trump attacking John McCain’s military record and the likely political fallout tied to his remarks. 



You can usually set your watch to it.

First, you learn about a "progressive" or liberal darling who makes a controversial, over-the-top statement which would get him or her in serious trouble with the general public if widely known. About 24 hours later, you visit establishment press coverage of the event, especially at the Associated Press, and find not a hint that anything controversial occurred. Such is the case with Hillary Clinton's comments yesterday at the annual Women in the World summit in Washington. Video, a transcript, and a portion of Julie Pace's AP whitewash follow the jump.



As we would cynically say back in the good old days in Queens [insert NYC accent]: yeah, right. 

On today's Morning Joe, Associated Press White House correspondent Julie Pace claimed that one thing that made Hillary hesitate in deciding to run for president was that she "worried that her candidacy would block out Joe Biden who is quite a close friend of hers."  When Joe Scarborough expressed skepticism, and the panel burst into guffaws, Joe said "Good. I'm not the only one laughing at that."



On Wednesday's New Day, CNN's John King, along with National Journal's Ron Fournier and the AP's Julie Pace, offered Hillary Clinton some advice, after the Democrat told a friendly audience of journalists that she hoped for a "new relationship with the press." Fournier replied that "she...needs an intervention of folks who understand the media, and can explain to her, they're not your enemy. They're also not your friend. If you want to get the benefit of the doubt from the media, what you got to do is be honest."



The only truly liberal democracy in the Middle East and America's greatest ally in the region yesterday conducted a free and fair election which returned its prime minister to office with a renewed mandate to govern. But to the Associated Press, the takeaway was that the Israeli people threw away an opportunity for a "thaw" in U.S.-Israeli relations by failing to oust Benjamin Netanyahu.



Nearly six years into Barack Obama's presidency, it's still George W. Bush's fault.

Early Wednesday morning, Julie Pace at the Associated Press proved yet again why it is more than appropriate to characterize the wire service where she works as the Administration's Press. The headline at Pace's story tells us that poor President Barack Obama still has to confront the "Bush legacy," and is still stuck with his wars and "big chunks of Bush's national security apparatus." Cry me a river, Julie. One of Pace's more important omissions is the fact that the enhanced interrogations program Senate Democrats are decrying was a creation of none other than Bill Clinton.



While it is indeed nice that the Associated Press did a fact check on President Obama's Thursday night immigration address — an item P.J. Gladnick at NewsBusters covered on Saturday — it would have been even nicer if the wire service better described as the Administration's Press had fact-checked Julie Pace's and Josh Lederman's awful Friday evening backgrounder on the speech.

The AP pair couldn't even get through their first three paragraphs without distorting beyond repair their presentation of allegedly "soaring deportations."



During a segment on Thursday's Andrea Mitchell Reports on MSNBC, fill-in host Kristen Welker noted Joe Biden making a string of gaffes – which included using an anti-Semitic slur – during a trip to Iowa, but then she and her guests proceeded to excuse his offensive remarks as merely being part of his charm. [Listen to the audio]

The Washington Post's Chris Cillizza observed: "Joe Biden is probably the most 'real,' I suppose, politician you have these days. He does say what's on his mind. Unfortunately, what's on his mind often gets him in trouble."



In the wake of Hillary Clinton’s visit to the early primary state of Iowa, the folks at CNN had some surprisingly harsh words for Democrats running for reelection in 2014.

During an appearance on Sunday’s Inside Politics, Washington Post reporter Nia Malika Henderson conceded that Democrats have no desire to campaign with the president and instead “want him out behind closed doors.” Henderson went on to admit that “he’s starting to be a drag..in terms of women, that core constituency.”