CNN’s King Slams Trump as a ‘Racist’ With a ‘Horrible Dark Reflex’

Since Thursday, the liberal media have had a field day attacking President Trump when it was leaked that he had slammed certain counties for being undesirable places to live. Since then, CNN has been the banner carrier for those eager to pass opinion off as news and call the President a racist with impunity. On Sunday’s Inside Politics, CNN host John King was no different as he led a panel of journalists in anti-Trump smears while claiming to know exactly what racist thoughts were in his head.

Don't hold your breath waiting for Donald Trump to apologize,” the bitter King spat towards the top of the program as he proceeded to whine about Trump tweeting out “America First” over the weekend. “This president's first reflex is to curry favor with his anti-immigration, nationalist base,” he chided.

King claimed to know every racist thought inside the President’s head. And suddenly, Trump’s comments directed at poorly-run countries was somehow about questioning the humanity of the innocent people living there:

His image of America first, we learned much more clearly in recent days, is an America that welcomes white immigrants from Norway, but not black immigrants or brown immigrants from places the president clearly thinks produce subpar humans.

Now, there are significant first-year achievements the President could be celebrating this week” instead of talking about immigrants, King lamented. But according to the liberal media up until now, Trump has had no real achievements to speak of including the tax cuts. “What is the price? What is the price for this? You see the global condemnation. Does he get it,” he wanted to know from Julie Pace of the Associated Press.

 

 

Pace argued that because of Trump’s comments, the Republican Party was set to have major “casualties” in the 2018 election. “I think that it also has ripped open a real debate in 2018 about whether the president of the United States is a racist,” she asserted. “That is a real and frankly legitimate question to be asking. And again, it's quite jarring to be having that conversation in 2018.

King would turn his ire on Trump supporters by smearing them as “reprehensible” human beings for agreeing with the President’s comments about those countries. “His instinct is to disparage non-whites. His instinct is to disparage immigrants,” he continued, effectively ignoring how he's disparaged people of every race.

I'm sorry, there is no other way to process this, as the debate about whether the president of the United States, who's supposed to be setting an example, is racist or a race-baiter or just has a horrible dark reflex,” King emphatically declared. “This is a real low point for the country and a real low point for the presidency,” Margaret Talev of Bloomberg News agreed.

Talev bemoaned how Trump’s comments hurt the delicate feelings of the leaders of those countries, causing them to be “furious and humiliated and so angry at what he said.” “The African Union delegation to the United Nations flat out called the president of the United States racist. Publically called the president of the United States racist that is remarkable,” King reminded his liberal panel.

The relevant portions of the transcript are below:

 

Sign Up for MRC Newsletters!

 

CNN
Inside Politics
January 14, 2018
8:02:15 AM Eastern

(…)

JOHN KING: Don't hold your breath waiting for Donald Trump to apologize. He tells friends the media now making too much of the fact that he disparaged Haitians and questioned why America would welcome immigrants from African nations he called latrines. The president used a far more vulgar term, we’re going to try not to repeat it here this morning. Several of his weekend tweets were efforts to change the subject. But one, just two words, "America first" reminds us, this president's first reflex is to curry favor with his anti-immigration, nationalist base. His image of America first, we learned much more clearly in recent days, is an America that welcomes white immigrants from Norway, but not black immigrants or brown immigrants from places the president clearly thinks produce subpar humans.

(…)

KING: Now, there are significant first-year achievements the President could be celebrating this week. And there are significant governing challenges here and now, including the fact the government runs out of money Friday, without a new spending plan. Instead, another mess of the President's own making. … What is the price? What is the price for this? You see the global condemnation. Does he get it?

JULIE PACE: I don't know if he gets the scope of it. His instinct tends to be to dig in, even when he sees everyone around him running away. But I think that there are a couple of potential casualties for him here. One, he puts his party once again in the position of having to defend, make a choice, to defend or to walk away from pretty indefensible comments. And it puts them in a position of not being able to do things like talk about the tax reform bill, which is what they leaned on, all through last year. Every time one of these moments would come up, you would have Paul Ryan, Mitch McConnell say, but at least the president will sign our agenda. Well, now he's done that and they're still having to answer for him. I think that it also has ripped open a real debate in 2018 about whether the president of the United States is a racist. That is a real and frankly legitimate question to be asking. And again, it's quite jarring to be having that conversation in 2018.

KING: And we've seen this time and time again. His instinct is to disparage non-whites. His instinct is to disparage immigrants. And the White House is not -- what can they say? What have they said? Nothing.

MICHAL BENDER: The initial reaction from the white house is that this would help with the base. You were making the point earlier--

KING: That's additionally reprehensible.

BENDER: Right.

(…)

KING: I'm sorry, there is no other way to process this, as the debate about whether the president of the United States, who's supposed to be setting an example, is racist or a race baiter or just has a horrible dark reflex.

MARGARET TALEV: This is a real low point for the country and a real low point for the presidency. There also are, as I see it, two political implications. One is domestically, it's certain to motivate Democratic turnout and to depress Republican turnout in a really crucial midterm year. But there are also foreign policy implications, because they're on the scale of Haiti to Norway, there are a whole lot of countries closer to the Haiti scale in terms of economic well-being or that sort of thing. That the U.S. Is relying on right now to make a number of deals and arrangements work. Whether it involves information on terrorism sharing, whether it involves pathways, literally, across, you know, national lines on terrorism policy, and foreign policy.

And all of this stuff comes into play, the sort of geopolitical implications of this much less just the relationship with the allies. I mean, the trip to England and the UK has been canceled. The relationship with western European allies is further complicated by this. And there are a lot of countries in Africa and in the Middle East that are furious and humiliated and so angry at what he said. And are perhaps willing to even give up some U.S. aid and turn other countries.

KING: The African Union delegation to the United Nations flat out called the president of the United States racist. Publically called the president of the United States racist that is remarkable.

(…)

NB Daily Campaigns & Elections Foreign Policy Immigration Labeling Cable Television CNN Inside Politics Video John King Margaret Talev Julie Pace Donald Trump

Sponsored Links